This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

 

Acknowledgement: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to contribute to the promotion of this unique opportunity.  We acknowledge the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society’s website as the source for most of this content.

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society is an enterprising non-profit organization that develops and delivers transformative education inspired by Haida Gwaii. In partnership with leading universities, we offer students immersive, experiential learning opportunities in rural, resource-dependent communities in transition. Here the Haida Nation, island communities, and provincial and federal governments are working through complex joint management models towards reconciliation and sustainability.

Drawing on Haida Gwaii’s legacy of innovation and leadership, HGHES offers a range of programming including undergraduate semesters, executive education and professional development courses, research opportunities, public lectures and workshops, and more.

The Haida Gwaii Semesters include the following areas of focus:

  1. Natural Resource Science
  2. Natural Resource Studies
  3. Reconciliation Studies
  4. Marine Planning

Please visit http://hghes.ca/haida-gwaii-semesters/ for more information, including the application process, tuition, fees and FAQs

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society embraces a place-based approach; we see the social and ecological systems of Haida Gwaii as vibrant natural classrooms for our students to engage with, grounding course content in living, local case studies. We believe in working together and facilitating a rich collaboration between academics and local knowledge holders, supporting a meaningful learning exchange and the development of a broad perspective.

  • As issues around the globe become increasingly complex, If students are from UBC, there is an agreement in place to facilitate registration.
  • For non-UBC students there is an opportunity to earn UBC credits and transfer them back to the student’s home institution.

 

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. The Archives Association of British Columbia (AABC) and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre are pleased to present the webcast roundtable “Talking with First Nations Archives. ” Colleagues who work in local First Nations Archives, Resource Centres and in Records Management programs will share their experiences establishing archives, their role in facilitating access to records, and issues and concerns they encounter on a daily basis.

This event happened on February 23, 2017.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Lawson, K. L. (2004, November 24). Precious fragments : First Nations materials in archives, libraries and museums (T). [Link]

UBC Library Research Guides

Archival Material

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Library & Archival Studies

Every Spring since 1981, Vancouver’s Alcuin Society holds a national competition to select the country’s most beautiful books of the previous year. The winning books tour every province in Canada, and are also exhibited at the two major book fairs in Germany, in Frankfurt and Leipzig. As well, copies are donated to the Canadian Embassy Library in Tokyo, where they are exhibited during the Tokyo International Book Fair.

 

The purpose of the competition is to motivate publishers to pay attention to the look of books, as well as to their content. In addition, the Society hopes to encourage book designers by national and international recognition of their work.

 

The books are judged by three different jurors each year – experts in their fields from all over the country, and, occasionally, from abroad. The entire book is taken into account: the cover, the choice of type, layout, white space; paper used, readibility, creativity in design; and most of all, the appropriateness of the design to the content.

 

This March, IKBLC is exhibiting the winners from last year’s competition. There are eight categories of books: from children’s books to pictorial, from poetry to reference. Some of the judges’ comments on what they liked about the books are available, and displayed near the books.

 

PDFs of the full-colour awards catalogues are available online for some of the past competition winners. In mid-March 2017, the Society’s 35th competition will take place in Vancouver, for Canada’s 2016 publications, and when it’s published, this year’s catalogue will be available online as well.

 

This exhibit takes place March 1 to 31, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level).

Take a rare glimpse into Japan in the 1890s-1920s through the photographs taken by a Canadian missionary, John Cooper Robinson. We can only begin to understand Cooper Robinson’s photographs by overlaying both Canadian and Japanese historical contexts and perspectives. Join our symposium led by art historians and historians who specialize in Japan and Canada, to explore ways in which the Cooper Robinson photographs can be used and made relevant for future research and teaching. Symposium attendees will have the opportunity to visit the ongoing curated exhibit at Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). Register here for this event!


Event Details

When: Friday, March 24 2017  12:00 PM-4:00 PM

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room

Symposium

12:00-1:00
Registration | Reception (light refreshments will be provided)
1:00-1:15 pm
Opening Remarks | Introduction (donor, Jill Robinson)
1:15-2:00 pm
Allen Hockley (respondent, Ignacio Adriasola)
2:00-3:00 pm
RBSC exhibit visit | coffee break
3:00-3:15 pm
Hamish Ion
3:15-4:00 pm
Round table discussion (facilitator, Tristan Grunow) | Concluding Remarks


Speakers and Participants

Allen Hockley is Associate Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College. He specializes in early Japanese photography and woodblock prints and illustrated books from the Tokugawa through early Showa periods.

A. Hamish Ion is a professor emeritus in the History Department, Royal Military College of Canada. He is a specialist in modern Japanese history.

Ignacio Adriasola is assistant professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory at the University of British Columbia.

Tristan Grunow is assistant professor without review in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia.

The Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections and are delighted to host a symposium to launch our current exhibit Double Exposure | Japan-Canada: Missionary Photographs of Meiji-Taisho Japan.

This event is made possible through generous support from the Center for Japanese Research, the UBC History Department, the UBC Library, and nominal support from the Consulate General of Japan.

For more information, please contact Japanese Language Librarian Naoko Kato at naoko.kato@ubc.ca.

In collaboration with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre Community Engagement & Programs division, the Faculty Association Contract Faculty Committee presents the Third Annual Contract Faculty Colloquium, which provides contract faculty an opportunity to share with and learn from their contract faculty colleagues across campus in a genial, relaxed atmosphere. Short papers will be presented by contract faculty from a diverse range of departments, including Engineering, Political Science, English, Sociology, Asian Studies, Gender, Race and Social Justice and Arts Studies in Reading and Writing. Please join us for a stimulating afternoon!

We are grateful for the support from the UBC Faculty Association for the support of this event.


Event Details

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Time: 11:30-4:30pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room (Rm 301)

 

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health. Can’t make this event? It will be made online for viewing from the IKBLC webcast portal.

Date: Wednesday, 15 March 2017, 6:30-8:30pm at UBC Robson Square, Room C100

Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry), Evan Bowness (IRES), Mollie Chapman (IRES), Tugce Conger (IRES), Jamie Fenneman (Botany), Graham McDowell (IRES), Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health), Steve Williams (IRES), Stefan Pauer (Law).

Experience Some of the Best of UBC

Offered on Saturdays in the fall and winter terms at the UBC Point Grey campus, One Day @ UBC single-day courses provide easy and affordable access to top experts in their field – and the small class size ensures ample opportunities for discussion. One Day @ UBC courses can be applied toward a UBC Certificate in Liberal Studies.

Sign up to UBC Continuing Studies’ email subscription list to receive valuable news and updates about its upcoming courses, too.


Course List

Calling Cartographers: Learn Open Source Geographic Information Systems

Diabetes: How interactions between our Genes and Environment Cause a Global Epidemic

Egypt and the Bible: Cultural Contact in Literature, Religion and Art

Object Lessons, Object Questions: A One Day Experiment @ MOA

Politics, Literature and Painting through Three Women of the 20th Century: Evita Peron, Gabriela Mistral and Frida Kahlo

Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: How Can We Best Produce our Food?

Sleep: Your Other Life

Thor and Company: Old Norse Mythology through the Ages

 

 

Freedom of Expression is a charter right in Canada and is a fundamental value of professional groups such as librarians, archivists and journalists, who promote transparency, public accountability and the broadest possible access to information. However, we are seeing an erosion of these values in public life, through steps to censor scientists and public servants, to retract, hide or ignore information that does not conform to partisan views, and to treat the free press as a public enemy. This is a symptom of “post-truth” politics, in which sentiment and personal belief have more influence than facts, and facts are openly manipulated. As fake news, Orwellian newspeak and “alternative facts” flood our media streams, how do we continue to make sense of our world? How do we hold public figures accountable for their actions?

This open mic session invites the UBC community to speak up on what freedom of expression means in this post-truth era. Bring your thoughts, arguments, poems, and stories – everyone is welcome!


Event Details

When:  February 28th, 2017 12:30-1:45 PM

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 2nd floor foyer space

Facilitator(s): Milena Constanda, Erin Fields

Register for this event through your UBC Campus-Wide Login here.

 

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet