Recently the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office released its 2017/2018 Impact and Activity Report, showcasing some of the year’s highlights and accomplishments.

For more information, or to share feedback please contact scholarly.communications@ubc.ca

Read the Report.


Knowledge Unlatched, a prominent publisher of Open Access monographs, recently announced the achievement of an important milestone – Over 950 open access titles from the Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS) have been accessed more than 1 million times by users worldwide in the past 8 months of this year alone. This achievement represents a significant increase in downloads over the previous year.

UBC Library is a proud supporter of Knowledge Unlatched, and, along with over 500 other libraries worldwide, helps make academic monographs openly accessible online, for free. This partnership demonstrates the Library’s commitment to open access and providing academic materials to as wide an audience as possible.

The three federal research funding agencies—the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) (the agencies)— have put forward a draft Research Data Management Plan and are currently soliciting feedback from researchers and institutions. According to information on the CIHR website, the proposed policy “aims to support Canadian research excellence by fostering sound digital data management and data stewardship practices.

The draft policy includes suggested requirements related to three primary areas:

1. Institutional data management strategies
2. Researcher data management plans
3. Data deposit”

UBC Library is already very active in providing research data management services and you can learn more about what is already available at: https://researchdata.library.ubc.ca/, or by contacting Eugene Barsky, Research Data Services Librarian.

Individuals interested in providing feedback on the Policy can either respond directly to the Tri-Agencies’ call, or they can submit their feedback to the Office of the Vice President, Research & Innovation via their online form and responses will be consolidated and sent in on behalf of UBC.

Recently, the 2018 Open Access Week Advisory Committee revealed the theme for this year’s Open Access Week to be “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge”.

In the words of the Advisory Committee, “This year’s theme reflects a scholarly system in transition. While governments, funders, universities, publishers, and scholars are increasingly adopting open policies and practices, how these are actually implemented is still in flux. As open becomes the default, all stakeholders must be intentional about designing these new, open systems to ensure that they are inclusive, equitable, and truly serve the needs of a diverse global community. This year’s Open Access Week invites all interested stakeholders to participate in advancing this important work.”

Open Access Week is a great opportunity for the Scholarly Communications Office, the Library, and the greater UBC community to engage in dialogue around open access and foster greater participation in Open Access initiatives happening both on and off campus.

In collaboration with various partners, internally and externally, UBC Library has been celebrating Open Access Week for several years and looks forward to working with this year’s theme to continue the important conversations surrounding Open Access.

If you would like to catch up on last year’s “Exploring Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship” panel, co-sponsored by UBC, SFU, BCIT, and BCcampus, watch the recording, available on the Open UBC website.

Also look to UBC Library’s Open Access page for more information in the Fall.

 

The Scholarly Communications team has recently released two videos meant to provide the UBC community with a brief introduction into two important topics:

  • How to comply with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications and;
  • Author Rights (everything you need to know before, during, and after you sign a publisher agreement)

The format for these videos is information you can use in 5 minutes or less, so if you have a few minutes to spare and are curious, check them out below:

 

Tri-Agency Open Access Policy

 

Author Rights

 

 

 

The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) provides a critical service to the open access publishing community by curating a comprehensive white list of trusted open access journals. As a result of this work, DOAJ increases the “visibility, accessibility, reputation usage and impact of quality peer-reviewed open access scholarly research journals globally” (DOAJ).

Operating as a not-for-profit organization, DOAJ relies on the voluntary donations of its member institutions in order to sustain its services. While this funding model has allowed DOAJ to establish a robust and trusted database of reputable open access journals, it does not afford them the ability to conduct long term planning or invest in substantial upgrades. In response to this precarious funding model, the organizations in SCOSS (The Global Sustainability Coalition for the Open Science Series) put forward a recommendation that DOAJ supporting members make a commitment to fund DOAJ for the three years, allowing the organization to make significant contributions to their strategic initiatives.

UBC Library, which has long been a supporting member of DOAJ, has signed on to provide this additional sustaining financial support and looks forward to the future resources and services that DOAJ will create as a result of more stable funding.

Read more about DOAJ’s accomplishments in 2017

Register Now for the Next Open Scholarship in Practice Day – May 2

Open scholarship, which encompasses open science, open access, open data, open education, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is transforming how knowledge is created and shared.
Join us for a full day of workshops exploring the practice of open scholarship – from new tools that can increase the reproducibility of research, to new pedagogies that become possible when students and faculty become co-creators engaged in generative knowledge creation. Hear from UBC colleagues who are incorporating “openness” in innovative ways to enhance teaching, research, and public impact.
Featured sessions include:

  • hands-on training for tools such as Open Science Framework, GitHub, WeBwork, Pressbooks
  • next steps in Canada’s Tri-Council Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management
  • faculty lightning talks on open education tools and practices at UBC.

Eric Eich, Vice Provost and Associate VP Academic and Jason Pither, Associate Professor of Biology at UBC Okanagan, are among those leading UBC’s efforts towards a more open research culture. “There’s clearly a huge appetite among UBC researchers to learn how to ensure their work is reproducible, transparent, and open. We’re excited about all the initiatives surrounding open scholarship at UBC, and look forward to describing some of these efforts to the UBC community.”

Christina Hendricks, Deputy Academic Director of CTLT adds that open education “activities have the potential to engage students more in what they’re doing, and also thereby help promote deeper learning, since their work will have more lasting and widespread value.”

The event will be held May 2, 9am-4pm at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. All events are free and open to all but registration is required. Lunch and coffee breaks provided. The full program with registration links is available at https://events.ctlt.ubc.ca/events/2018-open-scholarship-in-practice/. Space is limited so register by April 25th.

 

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