*UPDATE* this presentation is now available online >here<

Andrew Waller

In June 2008, Libraries and Cultural Resources at the University of Calgary established an Open Access Authors Fund. The first of its kind in Canada and the sixth such program in the world, the Fund is designed to pay submission fees for University of Calgary authors who have articles accepted in Open Access journals that charge such fees. This initiative and other open access funds established at University of California-Berkeley, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, University of Nottingham, and University of Amsterdam represents innovative ways Libraries, typically in partnership with their University administrations or VP of Research offices, are supporting open access publication on their campuses.

Monday, November 17th, 2008

3:30 to 5:00pm Dodson Room (302), Irving K. Barker Learning Centre The University of British Columbia

Andrew Waller is Serials Librarian in the Collections Services unit at the University of Calgary. He also has some managerial responsibilities in the Serial Acquisitions unit. Andrew regularly writes and speaks on topics such as Open Access, e-journals, the effects of the USA PATRIOT and similar legislation on Canadian libraries, and systematic downloading. He is a contributor to the Open Access Librarian blog and is a Canadian editor for E-LIS.

The freedom of the Internet and the digital age has challenged the role of copyright. What should copyright look like when information can be moved so freely? Should we continue to protect intellectual property and authorship the way we always have?
Tina Piper, co-Director of Creative Commons Canada will explain how Creative Commons offers an alternative to traditional copyright. Creative Commons is a non-profit group that develops licenses which allow authors/rights-holder to alter the conditions of use on their copyrighted works. Creative Commons defines the spectrum of possibilities between full copyright — all rights reserved — and the public domain — no rights reserved. Learn how Creative Commons licenses help authors and creators keep their copyright while inviting certain uses of your work — a “some rights reserved” copyright.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet