[Letter, Charles R. Darwin to John Burdon-Sanderson, July 16, 1875]. RBSC-ARC-1731-1-22

In honour of Science Literacy Week 2020’s theme of biodiversity, we’re excited to highlight UBC Library’s two collections of archival materials related to English naturalist and geologist Sir Charles Darwin.

Darwin-Burdon Sanderson Collection

This collection, which was acquired by Woodward Library in 1966, consists of correspondence between Darwin and physiologist Sir John Scott Burdon-Sanderson from the years 1873-1881. After his medical education at the University of Edinburgh and at the University of Paris, Burdon-Sanderson became a Medical Officer of Health for Paddington in 1856 and subsequently a physician to the Middlesex Hospital and the Brompton Consumption hospitals. Between 1858-1866, he investigated diphtheria, cattle plague, and cholera when they appeared in England. He was one of the forerunners of penicillin, observing its ability to inhibit the growth of bacteria before Alexander Fleming. Burdon-Sanderson was also the first person chosen to be the Waynflete Chair of Physiology in Oxford in 1882. In 1895, he became Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, a post he held until his resignation in 1904.

The letters in this collection deal with the research Darwin and Burdon Sanderson did on the digestive powers and leaf movements of insect-eating plants, notably Drosera and Dionaea. Darwin published the results of this research as part of his Insectivorous Plants (1875).

Pearce/Darwin Fox Collection

This collection is made up of family records of the Darwin Fox family, most notably correspondence between William Darwin Fox and his second cousin Charles Darwin. The Reverend William Darwin Fox graduated from Cambridge in 1829 and was appointed vicar of Delamere, Cheshire in 1838, where he remained until his retirement in 1873. Darwin Fox shared his cousin’s passionate interest in natural history. In addition to being a naturalist, he was also an entomologist, with a particular interest in collecting beetles. He is credited as the person who introduced Darwin to entomology and tutoring him in natural history. Fox and Darwin had quite a close relationship, maintaining regular contact through letters. The collection was purchased by Woodward Library in 1970 from Captain Christopher Pearce, a descendant of the Fox family and resident of Vancouver Island.

Both of these collections have been digitized and are available in UBC Library’s Open Collections for your perusal and ejoyment.

Science Literary Week runs from September 21 to 27, 2020. For more details about Science Literacy Week activities at the Library, visit the UBC Library Guide to Science Literacy Week.

“The Fairy Tales of Science” ( PZ6 1866 .B76)

Thank you for joining us for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’ve been excited to share over the past couple of months the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image”.

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit.

These two will likely be the last student assignment we’ll be sharing through the blog, and we hope you have enjoyed them as much as we have! Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students and stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

“The Bear’s Kingdom” (PZ6 1897 .R644)

Five fairy tale selections, part XII:

 

 

From “Volʹga” (PZ63.7 .V65 1904)

Happy Friday, and welcome back for this week’s Friday fairy tales blog post!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys” (PZ6 1892 .H3)

We hope you enjoy these charming fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part XI:

From “Mopsa, the Fairy” (PZ6 1910 I533)

We’re glad to have you back for our new tradition on the RBSC blog: Friday fairy tales!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “The Three Little Kittens” (PZ4.9.B2247 Th 1862)

We hope you enjoy these charming fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part X:

 

 

From “Granny’s Wonderful Chair and Its Tales of Fairy Times” (PR10.R9 R3 1906)

Just in time for a summer-like weekend in Vancouver, we welcome the return of our fantastic five favourite fairy tales feature!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with the public through the RBSC blog.

We thought we had posted the last of these shared fairy tale picks some weeks ago, but then even more generous students stepped forward to share their selections, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

From “Dot and Tot of Merryland” (PZ6 1901 .B395)

We hope you enjoy these additional fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part IX:

With the closure of UBC Library due to the quickly evolving situation with COVID-19, we apologize that this wonderful exhibition will not be open to the public in the coming weeks. Please enjoy these photos of the exhibition, which were taken by the talented student curators. A complete catalogue of the exhibition can be downloaded here.


Rare Books and Special Collections at UBC Library is delighted to announce a new exhibition: The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks.

Many thanks to guest bloggers Logaine Navasques, Maureen Duteau, Jacqueline Noel, and Jordyn Zirk for contributing the below post! Logaine and Maureen, graduate students in the Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program, and Jacqueline and Jordyn, graduate students at the UBC School of Information, curated this magical new exhibition under the supervision of Dr. Kathryn Shoemaker, Adjunct Professor with the UBC School of Information.

The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks is a chronological look at the evolution of the picturebook, one of the important literary art forms to emerge from the 20th Century. The exhibit features ground breaking, innovative books such as Millions of Cats, Madeline, Where the Wild Things Are,  The Very Hungry Caterpillar, I Want My Hat Back and other brilliant picturebooks responsible for forging a literary art form that reflects the culture of its time and is becoming a vital form in promoting visual and print literacy for all ages.  

The literary picturebook is a new literary art form that emerges in the 20th century, evolving from the  illustrated children’s book. It evolves concurrently with two other relatively new visual sequential narrative forms, comic/graphic novels and animated films. The three forms influence each other as they develop principally because so many of the creators worked in all three forms. This exhibit highlights key books in this evolution revealing how each changed the nature and content of the picturebook form.

The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks is on display from March 4 through May 30, 2020. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and people of all ages are encouraged to attend. A complete catalogue of the exhibition can be downloaded here. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

From “The Sleeping Beauty and Other Fairy Tales from the Old French” (PZ6 1910 Q954)

We’ve made it to Friday, and have also arrived at our final “five favourite fairy tales” assignment post. Thank you so much to Professor Pamela Dalziel and her students in the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image” for sharing these with us! Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

For this assignment, Professor Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.”

We hope you enjoy these final fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

From “The Emperor’s New Clothes” (PZ8 .A542 St 1911)

Five fairy tale selections, part VIII:

 

 

“Beauty and the Beast” (SPAM23774)

I hope everyone enjoyed a lovely weekend!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “The House of Joy” (PR10.S5 H6 1895)

So far we have sixteen assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part VII:

From “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” (PZ6 1902 P687)

Since we’ll be away on Friday and Monday for the Easter long-weekend, this will be the last new fairy tale post until next week. Happily, today’s fairy tale picks feature one of literature’s favourite rabbits!

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

So far we have sixteen assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time over the coming weeks. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

“The Fairy Tales of Science” (PZ6 1866 .B76)

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part VI:

 

From “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” (PR10.M2 B7 1889 P5)

Then there were five“…

Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “Red Riding Hood” (PZ6 1895 .R427)

So far we have sixteen assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time over the coming weeks. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part V:

 

 

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