Rare Books and Special Collections at UBC Library is delighted to announce a new exhibition: “An Unmatched Devotion”: A 50th Anniversary Exhibition for UBC’s Norman Colbeck Collection of Nineteenth-Century and Edwardian Poetry and Belles Lettres.

Date: September 1 to October 12, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

Popular Art is the name given to the artistic creations made by peasants, indigenous people or craftsmen with no formal artistic training. A traditional popular art item is handmade and has a functional purpose opposing an art object that is made for aesthetic purposes only, however, in the XXI Century technique has evolved to a more aesthetic representation.

Presented by MexicoFest, we invite all art enthusiasts to attend this free exhibition at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre on Mexican Popular Art objects.

 

Date: May 1 – 31, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

This exhibition honours the special significance that written forms hold across the many unique cultures of Asia – a vast geographical area boasting an enormous diversity of languages and writing systems.

Each case features rare texts and diverse forms of bookmaking that highlight the prominent role of writing and calligraphy found across Asia. Encompassing Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Farsi, Tibetan, Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Gujarati scripts, the works invite you to explore a range of cultural or sacred practices that find expression in the written word. These works provide a glimpse of the ingenious ways in which Asian writers have blurred the boundaries between the textual and the visual realms, creatively deploying script to communicate deeper layers of meaning that go beyond words themselves. All of the extraordinary texts on display belong to the collections of the UBC’s Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections.

This satellite exhibit is co-curated by April Liu (Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, Asia, MOA) and Fuyubi Nakamura (MOA Curator, Asia), in collaboration with the UBC’s Asian Library and UBC Rare Books and Special Collections. It is held in conjunction with Traces of Words: Art and Calligraphy from Asia, a larger exhibit on view at the Museum of Anthropology, from May 11 to October 9, 2017.

 

 

 


This exhibit takes place at IKBLC from April 1 to 28, 2017, as a collaboration between the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Community Engagement & Programs Division and the Roedde House Museum.  A re-mounting of an earlier three-part exhibit on three families called Victorian Vancouver: Family Portraits, this exhibit illustrates how migrant families in early 20th century Vancouver fostered their own sites of commerce, community, and culture.   The exhibit tells the stories of the Roedde’s and their printing business and the Lam family of Ho Sun Hing printers, the city’s first Chinese-English print shop.  This exhibit is a side-by-side story of these two early migrant family printers in Vancouver.  Ho Sun Hing Printers was Vancouver’s first Chinese-English print shop, founded by Lam family patriarch, Lam Lat Tong.

 

Image credit: The Lam Family

The shop was one of the oldest operating print businesses, with its final location in Vancouver’s historical Chinatown, closing recently in 2013 after being in business for more than a hundred years.  Although the Roedde House Museum does not house any of the Ho Sun Hing materials that were on display in 2014, this exhibit’s items are lent to the Museum by third-generation printer, Norman Lam.  Norman also graciously took the time to share his family’s story of migration to Canada, working in the print shop, and growing up in Chinatown.

The Roedde House Museum is a fully-restored and refurnished Victorian home in the West End.  Now a local hub for concerts, lectures, readings, and all sorts of community art, historical, and cultural events, the Roedde House is a “living museum” inviting guests to interact with the home and its artefacts to imagine what life was life for an upper-class migrant family at the turn of the 20th century.

Who were the Roedde’s?

Image credit: the Roedde House Museum

Gustav Roedde was one of the city’s first bookbinders and urban settlers. He was born in 1860 in Thuringen, Germany. He trained as a printer and bookbinder in Leipzig, Germany’s famed “City of Books”. In 1882 he emigrated to Ohio USA. There he met and married Matilda Cassebohm. In 1886 the couple moved to Canada and started a family and bookbinding and printing business. The house on 1415 Barclay Street was built for them in the year 1893. The Roedde home remains an important part of Vancouver History as one of the few Heritage Houses remaining and restored from a pivotal time in the beginnings in modern Vancouver.

With the growth of fast digital technology and communication today, we often take print for granted. But back in Gustav’s time, books and print were a major mode of communication. Vancouver as a settler city and colony, was able to develop businesses, industry, journalism, travel and of course, a government. It is arguable that print and book production by pioneers like Gustav, were solely responsible for the type of communication needed to grow these very sectors of the city we live in today. A new city was for migrants like Gustav, new opportunity. There was a common saying at the time to “Take it to the Roedde’s” whenever locals had printing or bookbinding needs.


This exhibit takes place April 1 to 28th, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level)


For questions, please contact the Community Engagement Librarian (Allan Cho) or Program Services Assistant (Kristen Wong)

Every Spring since 1981, Vancouver’s Alcuin Society holds a national competition to select the country’s most beautiful books of the previous year. The winning books tour every province in Canada, and are also exhibited at the two major book fairs in Germany, in Frankfurt and Leipzig. As well, copies are donated to the Canadian Embassy Library in Tokyo, where they are exhibited during the Tokyo International Book Fair.

 

The purpose of the competition is to motivate publishers to pay attention to the look of books, as well as to their content. In addition, the Society hopes to encourage book designers by national and international recognition of their work.

 

The books are judged by three different jurors each year – experts in their fields from all over the country, and, occasionally, from abroad. The entire book is taken into account: the cover, the choice of type, layout, white space; paper used, readibility, creativity in design; and most of all, the appropriateness of the design to the content.

 

This March, IKBLC is exhibiting the winners from last year’s competition. There are eight categories of books: from children’s books to pictorial, from poetry to reference. Some of the judges’ comments on what they liked about the books are available, and displayed near the books.

 

PDFs of the full-colour awards catalogues are available online for some of the past competition winners. In mid-March 2017, the Society’s 35th competition will take place in Vancouver, for Canada’s 2016 publications, and when it’s published, this year’s catalogue will be available online as well.

 

This exhibit takes place March 1 to 31, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level).

Take a rare glimpse into Japan in the 1890s-1920s through the photographs taken by a Canadian missionary, John Cooper Robinson. We can only begin to understand Cooper Robinson’s photographs by overlaying both Canadian and Japanese historical contexts and perspectives. Join our symposium led by art historians and historians who specialize in Japan and Canada, to explore ways in which the Cooper Robinson photographs can be used and made relevant for future research and teaching. Symposium attendees will have the opportunity to visit the ongoing curated exhibit at Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). Register here for this event!


Event Details

When: Friday, March 24 2017  12:00 PM-4:00 PM

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room

Symposium

12:00-1:00
Registration | Reception (light refreshments will be provided)
1:00-1:15 pm
Opening Remarks | Introduction (donor, Jill Robinson)
1:15-2:00 pm
Allen Hockley (respondent, Ignacio Adriasola)
2:00-3:00 pm
RBSC exhibit visit | coffee break
3:00-3:15 pm
Hamish Ion
3:15-4:00 pm
Round table discussion (facilitator, Tristan Grunow) | Concluding Remarks


Speakers and Participants

Allen Hockley is Associate Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College. He specializes in early Japanese photography and woodblock prints and illustrated books from the Tokugawa through early Showa periods.

A. Hamish Ion is a professor emeritus in the History Department, Royal Military College of Canada. He is a specialist in modern Japanese history.

Ignacio Adriasola is assistant professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory at the University of British Columbia.

Tristan Grunow is assistant professor without review in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia.

The Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections and are delighted to host a symposium to launch our current exhibit Double Exposure | Japan-Canada: Missionary Photographs of Meiji-Taisho Japan.

This event is made possible through generous support from the Center for Japanese Research, the UBC History Department, the UBC Library, and nominal support from the Consulate General of Japan.

For more information, please contact Japanese Language Librarian Naoko Kato at naoko.kato@ubc.ca.

In coordination with our current exhibition Ever Austen: Literary Timelessness in the Regency Period, Rare Books and Special Collections is delighted to host a special Austen-themed panel discussion. We’re delighted to be joined by scholars from both UBC and SFU for this fascinating discussion on and celebration of Jane Austen, in honour of the 200th anniversary of her death.

Jane Austen’s Print Trouble

Michelle Levy
Professor and Graduate Program Chair, Department of English, SFU
Kandice Sharren
Ph.D. candidate, Department of English, SFU

Although today regarded as one of the world’s great novelists, Austen’s success in print did not come during her lifetime. She had trouble finding publishers for her work; several of her works sold poorly; she earned little from them; and received only one major review. Our talk will explore this surprising publishing and printing history, offering insight into the challenges Austen faced in the difficult print marketplace of early nineteenth-century Britain.

Gothic Influences

Scott MacKenzie
Associate Professor, Department of English, UBC

It is tempting to see, in Northanger Abbey, a rejection of the values and conventions that we associate with gothic fiction, but Austen’s investment in gothic fiction is considerably more complex than simply as something to poke fun at. The novels of Ann Radcliffe in particular are among the most important precursors to Austen’s literary triumphs.

Jane Austen as Popular Culture: Then and Now

Tiffany Potter
Senior Instructor, Associate Head (Curriculum & Planning), and First-Year English Coordinator, Department of English, UBC

Jane Austen’s novels are widely read as Important Literature in university curricula, but she was a non-elite, popular writer in her own day, and her place in popular culture has expanded wildly in recent decades. This talk will engage current theories of popular culture to consider Austen’s work in the Regency and in recent popular culture, including film and television versions and novel adaptations that re-tell her stories for new audiences.

The panel will be moderated by UBC’s Professor Emeritus of English Herbert Rosengarten.


Event Details

Date: Thursday March 2, 2017
Time: 1:00-3:00 PM
Where: Lillooet Room (301), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre


The event is free and open to the public. We hope you can join us! For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at 604 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

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