Arthur Ray, the recipient of the 2017 Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize, has also won the Federation of Humanities and Social Sciences 2017 Canada Prize for his book, Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History.

University of British Columbia professor emeritus Arthur J. Ray is the winner of this year’s Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History.

 

Arthur J. Ray has won the Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia for his book Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History. The $1,000 prize, given by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, will be awarded at UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in June.

Published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, Ray’s book is a masterfully-written examination of land claims litigation between indigenous peoples and the settler societies of the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa that powerfully demonstrates the important role proceedings in British Columbia played in events of global significance.

“This book is the outgrowth of my involvement in aboriginal claims in Canada as an expert on the historical geography of the economies of First Nations and Metis communities,” says Dr. Ray, “Beginning with my participation in Delgamuukw v. The Attorney General of British Columbia (1997), l became interested in the ways extant case law and scholarship influenced claims research and, in turn, how the latter research advanced aboriginal rights law and scholarship about aboriginal people.”

“We are thrilled that this year’s Basil Stuart-Stubbs prize has been awarded to a book written by a UBC faculty member,” says Melody Burton, UBC’s Interim University Librarian. 

Arthur J. Ray is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia and has served as the co-editor of the Canadian Historical Review from 2003 to 2006. He is the author of several other books including Telling it to the Judge, An Illustrated History of Canada’s Native People and Bounty and Benevolence.

Shortlisted titles for the award include:

At Sea with the Marine Birds of the Raincoast by Caroline Fox (Rocky Mountain Books)

and

Yakuglas’ Legacy: The Art and Times of Charlie James by Ronald W. Hawker (University of Toronto Press).

The Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Book on British Columbia, sponsored by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, recognizes the best scholarly book published by a Canadian author on a B.C. subject. The award was established in memory of Basil Stuart-Stubbs, a bibliophile, scholar and librarian who passed away in 2012.Stuart-Stubbs’s many accomplishments included serving as the University Librarian at UBC Library and as the Director of UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. Stuart-Stubbs had a leadership role in many national and regional library and publishing activities. During his exceptional career, he took particular interest in the production and distribution of Canadian books, and was associated with several initiatives beneficial to authors and their readers, and to Canadian publishing.

BC BookLook covers John Thistle's win of the 4th annual Basil Stuart-Stubbs Award for Outstanding Scholarly Book on B.C., presented at UBC Library on June 9, 2016.
Researcher John Thistle has been named winner of this year’s UBC Library Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia for his first book.

John Thistle, winner of the 2016 Basil Stuart-Stubbs Book Prize

John Thistle’s book on the history of the grasslands of British Columbia’s interior is the winner of the fourth annual Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia. The $1,000 prize, given by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, will be awarded at UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in June.

The book, Resettling the Range: Animals, Ecologies, and Human Communities in British Columbia is a new study of the occupation of the Cariboo-Chilcotin region by ranchers and other settlers. Thistle’s book examines the ecological and historical impact of the settlement including eradicating grasshoppers and wild and feral horses from the grasslands.

“John’s book shines a light on an otherwise overlooked area of British Columbia’s history,” says Dr. Ingrid Parent, UBC’s University Librarian. “We are thrilled that this year’s Basil Stuart-Stubbs prize has been awarded to a book written by a UBC alumnus and published by UBC Press.”

Resettling the Range explores the profound consequences of eradication efforts in the BC interior in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries including the alteration of the ecological balance of the grasslands and the impact on the indigenous people in the area.

 

“I wanted to write a book about a landscape I loved. I also wanted to tell a story about the history of this place that was not limited to humanity alone, so a book that looked at the grasslands history from the vantage point of wild horses and grasshoppers was inherently attractive to me.” – John Thistle

 

Thistle is a PhD graduate from UBC’s department of geography and was most recently a Research Associate at Memorial University’s Labrador Institute where his work focused on the social, economic, and environmental legacies of large-scale resource extraction. Thistle’s teaching and research interests span environmental history, economic geography, and science and technology studies. Resettling the Range is his first published book.

The two other finalists are: Lisa Pasolli’s Working Mothers and the Child Care Dilemma: A History of British Columbia’s Social Policy (UBC Press) and Maria Tippett’s Made in British Columbia: Eight Ways of Making Culture (Harbour Publishing). For full citations, see the Shortlist 2016.


About the Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia

The Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia was established in memory of Basil Stuart-Stubbs, a bibliophile, scholar and librarian who passed away in 2012. Stuart-Stubbs was formerly University Librarian at UBC Library and Director of UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. The award, generously supported by donors, pays homage to his leadership role in many national and regional library and publishing activities, particularly in the production and distribution of Canadian books and Canadian publishing.

Jean Barman’s book on the history of French Canadians in British Columbia is the winner of the third annual Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia. The $1,000 prize, given by UBC Library and the Pacific BookWorld News Society, will be awarded at a June reception at UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

The book, French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest, examines French Canadians during BC’s early fur trading and the connections made with indigenous women and families. Barman’s work recasts the history of British Columbia from a French Canadian perspective, exploring how the relationship between fur trappers and indigenous peoples has shaped the Pacific Northwest.

“Jean’s book offers a new perspective on the role of women and indigenous people in British Columbia’s history that is truly significant to scholarly literature,” says Ingrid Parent, UBC’s University Librarian. “Basil would be pleased to know that a UBC Press book has claimed this year’s honour.”

Barman’s book consults rare archival sources and considers both individual histories and the history of groups to illustrate the significance of the role of French Canadians in BC’s history. Between the 1790s and the 1840s, French Canadian fur trappers impacted BC history in several ways including driving the fur economy, becoming the first non-indigenous people in the area to farm and contributing to the division of the Pacific Northwest, resulting in Canada’s Pacific shoreline.

“The most meaningful part of the process of writing the book was uncovering French Canadians and the indigenous women with whom they made their lives as real people making real contributions to the history of British Columbia and to the Pacific Northwest more generally, just as their descendants do into the present day,” says Barman, who is a professor emeritus for the Faculty of Education at UBC. “I realized one day I had slighted French Canadians as a component of British Columbia’s history. They had been absent from my history of the province, The West beyond the West, for lack of others writing about them, and I wanted to know more.”Barman profile

Barman will be awarded the annual Book prize – sponsored by UBC Library and Pacific BookWorld News – on June 9, 2015 at a reception at UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. 

Jean Barman has written several award winning books focused on the history of British Columbia, women and indigenous peoples. Barman is the recipient of the 2015 Sir John A. MacDonald Prize and the 2015 Governor General Award for Scholarly Research.

Two other finalists included Nancy J. Turner’s Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and the Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press) and editors ichard Beamish and Gordon Mcfarlane’s The Sea Among Us: the Amazing Strait of Georgia (Harbour Publishing, 2014). For full citations, see the Shortlist 2015.

 

About the Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Book on British Columbia

The Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on British Columbia was established in memory of Basil Stuart-Stubbs, a bibliophile, scholar and librarian who passed away in 2012. Stuart-Stubbs’s many accomplishments included serving as the University Librarian at UBC Library and as the Director of UBC’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. Stuart-Stubbs had a leadership role in many national and regional library and publishing activities. During his exceptional career, he took particular interest in the production and distribution of Canadian books, and was associated with several initiatives beneficial to authors and their readers, and to Canadian publishing.

 

map of vancouver

1983 Land Use: City of Vancouver,” from the Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Department Land Use Maps collection, courtesy of UBC Library’s Digital Collections.

 

In this month’s issue of LibFOCUS, the focus is on campus and urban planning. We celebrate the groundbreaking of a new Library facility, award a book prize for a bio of a renowned local architect, provide walking tours and explore land use maps from decades past. 

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