April is National Poetry Month. We’ve gathered some poetry and related items from Open Collections for your enjoyment.

UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections has 250 posters concerned with the advocacy for peace, equality and harmony during the Vietnam War era from the University of California’s Berkeley campus and other regions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Berkeley 1968-1973 Poster Collection contains a series of posters promoting poetry reading events:

[Berkeley writers for peace], [between 1968 and 1973?]

[Berkeley writers for peace], [between 1968 and 1973?]

[Gorilla poetry], [between 1968 and 1973?]

The CiTR Audiotapes collection is a collaboration between UBC Library’s Digitization Centre and CiTR 101.9 FM (the Student Radio Society of UBC). Spanning 1949 to 2000, this collection comprises interviews with independent artists and writers. Here is a recording of an address given by writer Margaret Atwood for the Alma Mater Society’s women’s studies program, including readings from her novel The Edible Woman and several poems:

The BC Historical Books collection also contains a collection of poetry.

How I once felt. Songs of love and travel, 1893

A garden by the sea, and other poems, 1921

Songs of the Cascades. First part, 1894

Here’s a book of prose and poetry related to Stanley Park:

By shore and trail in Stanley Park: legends and reminiscences of Vancouver’s beauty-spot and region of romance, with historical and natural history details, 1929

By shore and trail in Stanley Park, pp. 28-29

Finally, check out this beautiful calligraphy from the UBC Library Framed Works Collection. The note from the verso reads: “Written and illuminated by my father Lionel Haweis Vancouver 1911. He threw the work out as he was not satisfied with the art work & lettering. As a child I rescued it from his waste paper basket. He was surprised and very pleased I had the interest at 8 years.”

The Heritage, 1911

 

During this challenging time, we’d like to share a bit of comfort with you, so we’ve compiled a list of leisure readings from the Open Collection. Enjoy!

Travel

For the time being, most of us should stay at home and help to keep our communities safe. But this is also a good time to gather some travel inspiration. The BC Historical Books Collection features a lot of intricately illustrated travel books, with a focus on Canada and especially British Columbia.

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884

With numerous engraving illustrations and several maps, this book covers geography, history, and industry across Canada.

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, pp. 118-119

Canadian cities of romance, 1922

Written by Katherine Hale and illustrated by Dorothy Stevens, this book includes descriptions and illustrations of major Canadian cities.

Canadian cities of romance, 1922, pp.40-41

Canadian houses of romance, 1926

This book is a companion volume to Canadian Cities of Romance, describing historic houses across Canada.

Canadian houses of romance, 1926, pp. 160-161

Fishing

For those who enjoy angling and fly-fishing, the Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection is a treasure trove of rare and valuable books. The following are just two examples from more than 2,200 books.

The Fly maker’s hand-book, [1886?]

Containing nine coloured illustrations, this book presents 50 artificial flies for trout and grayling fishing.

The Fly maker’s hand-book, pp. 62-63

Salmon flies, [between 1890 and 1899?]

This is a fly-fishing book written by Geo. M. Kelson. With plenty of coloured illustrations, it provides details on the components of each fly, as well as the author’s comments.

Salmon flies, [between 1890 and 1899?], pp. 47-48

Children’s books

It can be challenging to work from home with kids. The Historical Children’s Literature Collection may help to distract your kids, so that you can focus on your work for awhile. Below are some chapbooks from the collection.

The two wealthy farmers; or, the history of Mr. Bragwell. Part I, [1795]

The history of Simple Simon, [1820?]

The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, 1807

With all the stress and uncertainty around us, take the opportunity to dive into one of these books and relax!

BP MUR SL P B696, [date unknown]

The Open Collections cover a wide range of topics and disciplines where you can find materials to support your research, teaching, and even hobbies. In this post, we select some of our collections that are related to Canadian literature.

Books

BC Historical Books

The goal of the BC Historical Books project is to build a single searchable database of the bibliography of British Columbia based on full-text searchable versions of the books contained therein. The result will allow scholars, students and the public unparalleled access to knowledge about our province.

The following is useful subject headings related to Canadian literature:

Pastoral literature

Juvenile literature

Canadian poetry

Fiction

Related genres include:

Novels

Travel literature

Poetry

Rural rhymes and the sheep thief, 1896

Snap: a legend of the lone mountain: with thirteen illustrations, 1890

Snap: a legend of the lone mountain: with thirteen illustrations, 1890, pp.94-95

Periodicals

UBC Library has a significant collection of small press literary magazines, most of which are held in Rare Books and Special Collections. These magazines published experimental and non-mainstream writings produced by relatively unknown authors. Some of these materials have been digitized and are available in the Open Collections.

PRISM international

PRISM international (1959 -) is a quarterly magazine out of Vancouver, British Columbia, whose mandate is to publish the best in contemporary writing and translation from Canada and around the world. Writing from PRISM has been featured in Best American Stories, Best American Essays and The Journey Prize Stories, amongst other noted publications.

Through a partnership with the UBC Creative Writing Department, UBC Library digitized all back-issues of PRISM in 2015. The full archive is available in Open Collections. To learn more about this collection, please check out this previous post.

PRISM also published a Cumulative Index Volume at their 25th anniversary, which lists all writings (through 1984) in alphabetical order by author.

Prism international, Oct 31, 1960

Prism international Cumulative Index Volume, 1 – 22, 1959 – 1984

The resources mentioned above all support full-text search. You may also be interested in this research guide: Special Collections: Canadian Literature.

In this two-part series, we compile images of winter activities and attractions from Open Collections. You can view Part I here.

Winter destinations

Banff National Park is a signature travel destination both in summer and winter. This menu from the Canadian Pacific Railway in the Chung Collection advertises winter sports in Banff on the cover.

Winter sports at Banff, Jun 29, 1928

Be sure to check out Lake Louise. This scenic lake is especially nice in the snow.

[Lake Louise], [between 1925 and 1935?]

Lake Louise, [between 1910 and 1919?]

Home of the Quebec Winter Carnival, Quebec City is known for its European feel. This pamphlet from the Chung Collection profiles the picturesque city in summer and winter.

Quebec: summer and winter, 1924

Quebec: summer and winter, 1897, p. 19

This Canadian Pacific Railway Company pamphlet promotes winter sports in Quebec City:

Chateau Frontenac: the wintersport capital of wintersport land, 1924

Located to the north-east of Quebec City, Montmorency Falls are also a must-see.

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p. 144

These two illustrations depict Niagara Falls in winter:

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 8

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 349

Montreal also had winter carnivals in the 1880s (Source: Wikipedia). These carnivals featured Ice Palaces, which were described in an illustrated book:

In the evening of the inauguration of the Ice Palace, everybody came to Dominion Square, where there was every sort of light but sunlight. The Ice Palace looked like glass; and I never saw anything so beautiful as when they burned blue, green, crimson and purple fires inside.

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p.253

Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive, 1889, p. 246

Canada: a memorial volume. General reference book on Canada; describing the dominion at large, and its various provinces and territories; with statistics relating to its commerce and the development of its resources. Maps and illustrations, 1889, p. 222

We hope you have a warm and wonderful holiday season!

The holiday season is fast approaching! Are you looking for vacation ideas? In this two-part series, we compile images of winter activities and attractions from Open Collections. Enjoy!

Winter sports

Canada is a playground for winter sports lovers. Snowshoeing, sledding, and tobogganing as recreational activities can date back to 19th century. Check out these engravings in Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil from the Chung collection:

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p.47

Canadian pictures: drawn with pen and pencil, 1884, p.48

Here are more illustrations of winter sports from the book Our own country, Canada: scenic and descriptive. Being an account of the extent, resources, physical aspect, industries, cities and chief towns of the provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, the North-west Territory, and British Columbia. With sketches of travel and adventure. Illustrated with three hundred and sixty engravings in the BC Historical Books Collection. The book was published in 1889.

Do not try it at home!

These postcards from the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs show winter leisure in Vancouver.

Skating on Trout Lake, Vancouver, B.C., [between 1915 and 1925?]

Winter sports, Grouse Mountain Park, North Vancouver, B.C., [between 1922 and 1941?]

This book from the BC Historical Books Collection has detailed information on the development of curling in British Columbia.

Manual 1907-8 of the British Columbia (formerly Kootenay) Curling Association in affiliation with the Royal Caledonian Curling Club, 1908

Finally, if none of the above strikes your fancy, there are also some unconventional games. This cartoon from Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection depicts fictional winter sports that “suit all tastes”.

New games for Christmas, 1911

In a previous blog post, we discussed John Gerard’s The herball, or, Generall historie of plants (1597), a book that features lists of plants with accompanying descriptions of their properties. For this blog, we will introduce more illustrations of plants in our Open Collections.

Botanical and ethnological appendix to Menzies’ journal of Vancouver’s voyage, April to October, 1792

Archibald Menzies was a Scottish surgeon, botanist and naturalist. He joined Captain George Vancouver’s voyage around the world in 1790 and kept a journal (source: Wikipedia). In 1923, part of Menzies’ journal that related to Vancouver Island and Puget Sound was published in Victoria, BC.

British botanist and ethnographic researcher Charles F. Newcombe made this appendix, introducing plants collected by Menzies on the north-west coast of America. It contains 5 illustrations, 3 of which were drawn by Menzies.

Alpine flora of the Canadian Rocky Mountains

Written by American botanist Stewardson Brown, this book is a guide to the rich and interesting flora of the Canadian Rockies and Selkirks. It is illustrated with plenty of water-colour drawings and photographs – here are some of our favorites.

What’s up buttercup?

These orchids have a funny name, lady’s slipper.

Here are more orchids in Canadian Rockies.Here are some berries from the rose family.

Finally, here are some anemone flowers:

 

Did you know that mountains cover 75 per cent of British Columbia[i]? Like the beaches we introduced in April, mountains offer beautiful scenery in summer. Today, we will focus on the Canadian Rockies depicted and described in our digitized photographs, illustrations, and books in Open Collections.

 

Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs

In the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs, you can find postcards of the Rockies:

Mt. Robson

This is a postcard of Mt. Robson, the highest peak (3,954 m; 12,972 ft) in British Columbia and of all the Canadian Rockies mountains:

Frank, Leonard. Mt. Robson, highest peak, Canadian Rockies, 1927

 

Mt. Field

Another postcard depicts Mt. Field (2,643 m; 8,671 ft), located within the Yoho National Park.

Mt. Field, Rockies, 1920

 

Mt. Stephen

The Langmann Collection has a photograph album titled, “20 real photographs of Canadian Rocky Mountains”. This is the photo of Field, BC and Mt. Stephen (3,199 m; 10,496 ft), which is also located within Yoho National Park. Mt. Stephen is the tallest of the mountains surrounding the town:

Field and Mount Stephen, [between 1920 and 1925?].

Chung Collection

Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa)

The Chung Collection also has numerous photographs of the Canadian Rockies mountains. Castle Mountain (Miistsukskoowa), a traditional territory of Siksika First Nation[ii], is located within Banff National park. It has numerous rock-climbing routes:

R. H. Trueman & Company. [Castle Mountain, Banff, Alberta], [between 1890 and 1899?].

The Three Sisters mountains

William Notman & Sons photography. [Three Sisters mountain range at Canmore, Alberta], 1899.

Mt. Assiniboine

Mt. Assiniboine (3,618 m; 11,870 ft) is located on the British Columbia/Alberta border.

Mt. Assiniboine, [between 1930 and 1939?].

Canadian Pacific Railway’s Advertisements

In the Chung Collection, we have digitized many advertising pamphlets of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company’s hotels and train tours which have beautiful illustrations on their front pages.

This 100-page booklet includes the detailed descriptions of each sightseeing spot in the Canadian Rockies:

The challenge of the mountains, 1904.

This five-page pamphlet also summarizes the resorts in the Rockies:

Through the Canadian Rockies, 1931.

 

BC Historical Books collection

BC Historical Books collection has books from the late 19th century and the early 19th century about the Canadian Rockies:

Outram, James, Sir. In the heart of the Canadian Rockies, 1905.

Coleman, A. P. The Canadian Rockies : new and old trails. With 3 maps and 41 illustrations, 1911.

 

We hope you have a chance to enjoy the mountain views this summer. If you want to explore more mountains in Open Collections, here are some items and keywords you can access:


[i] Geography of B.C. (Welcome BC)

[ii] Siksika Nation, federal government to honour Blackhoot traditions with Castle Mountain Settlement (Jan 25, 2017 in CBC News)

The BC Historical Books collection contains the digitized bibliographies of British Columbia. In the collection, there are 35 dictionaries related to BC History. Here, we will introduce some of our favourite ones!

City Directories

Do you have the White or Yellow Pages at home? UBC Rare Books and Special Collections has a collection of city directories for British Columbia and Greater Vancouver area. For various reasons, the directories cannot be photocopied in RBSC. UBC Library has published microforms for the directories, which are available in the Koerner Library Microforms area.

In Open Collections, you can find 19 digitized directories that are used as the White or Yellow Pages by residents between 1877 and 1923.

Henderson Publishing. Henderson’s city of Vancouver directory. Comprising an improved street and avenue guide, showing a complete index to system of house numbering and a complete street directory of the city, an alphabetically arranged list of business firms and companies, professional men and private citizens. And a classified business directory. Vol. XII, 1905.

 

The Geographical and Historical Dictionary of America and the West Indies by Antonio de Alcedo (1735-1812)

We have digitized volume 2 to 5 of The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies written by Antonio de Alcedo (1735-1812) in Spanish and translated by George Alexander Thompson (1797-1828) in 1812. The Spanish soldier, who resided in Panama for part of his childhood while his father was the provincial governor, was interested in American geography and history, and wrote about his observation of “New World” into the 5-volume books. He called the reference books “a dictionary”.

In volume 3 from pp.214 to 223, you can find Antonio’s observation of Vancouver Island:

Alcedo, Antonio de & Thompson, George Alexander. The geographical and historical dictionary of America and the West Indies. Containing an entire translation of the Spanish work of Colonel Don Antonio de Alcedo, captain of the Royal Spanish Guards, and member of the Royal Academy of History: with large additions and compilations from modern voyages and travels, and from original and authentic information. In five volumes. Vol. III, 1812.

 

Dictionaries for Indigenous languages

You can find dictionaries for three Indigenous languages: Chinook, Nuučaan̓uɫ (Nuu-chah-nulth, Nootka, Tahkaht) and Secwepemctsín (Shuswap language).

Chinook

Chinook language is spoken by Chinookan peoples who reside in the Pacific Northwest in the United States, present-day Oregon and Washington State. Open Collections has 8 language dictionaries:

Lindley, Jo. Three years in Cariboo: being the experience and observations of a packer, what I saw and know of the country; its traveled routes, distances, villages, mines, trade and prospects. With distances, notes and facts, relative to the Salmon River and Nez Perces gold fields, 1862.

 

Thomas, Edward Harper. Chinook: a history and dictionary of the Northwest coast trade jargon. The centuries-old trade language of the Indians of the pacific. A history of its origin and its adoption and use by the traders, trappers, pioneers and early settlers of the northwest coast, 1935.

 

Nuučaan̓uɫ (Nuu-chah-nulth, Nootka, Tahkaht) language

Nuučaan̓uɫ (Nuu-chah-nulth, Nootka, Tahkaht) language is spoken by 13 Indigenous nations residing in western Vancouver Island. Open Collections contains a digitized Tahkaht-English/English-Tahkaht dictionary published in 1868:

Kripe, C. Some account of the Tahkaht language, as spoken by several tribes on the western coast of Vancouver Island, 1868.

Secwepemctsín (Shuswap language)

Secwepemctsín (Shuswap language) is spoken by Secwépemc (Shuswap) people, Indigenous people residing in the south central part of present-day British Columbia. We have one dictionary known to be written in 1925 by Jean-Marie-Raphaël Le Jeune, a Canadian Roman Catholic priest who traveled the Kamloops region.

[Le Jeune, J. M. R.]. Studies on Shuswap, 1925.

About Canada

Who’s who in western Canada (volume 1-2) by Charles Wallace Parker (1864-1932)

Charles Wallace Parker (1864-1932) was a great showman, and famous for the C. W. Parker Carousel operating in the Burnaby Village Museum. He compiled portraits and biographies of people who had contributed to Western Canada, such as politicians, railroaders, litterateurs, and merchants.

Parker, C. W. Who’s who in western Canada: a biographical dictionary of notable living men and women in Western Canada Volume 1, 1911.

 

Volume 2, 1912.

 

The makers of Canada by Sir Arthur George Doughty (1860-1936) and Lawrence Johnstone Burpee (1873-1946)

The dictionary about Canada before confederation consists of three sections: Index and dictionary, Manuscript sources in the Dominion Archives, and A partial list of scarce maps and plans relating to Canada. One of the authors, Sir Arthur George Doughty (1860-1936) was a Dominion Archivist (the head of Canada’s national archives, the present Library and Archives Canada). Another author, Lawrence Johnstone Burpee (1873-1946) was a historian, a civil servant, a librarian and a writer, and specialized in Canadian bibliography, geography and history.

Doughty, Arthur G. & Burpee, Lawrence J. The makers of Canada. Index and dictionary of Canadian history, 1911.

 

If you want to get historical references to Greater Vancouver/BC/Canada, please find our digitized dictionaries in the BC Historical Books collection!

 

References

 

 

Since this April is National Poetry Month, we’ve gathered together selected poetry and related items from Open Collections for your enjoyment!

Our recently added Historical Children’s Literature Collection includes several poetry chapbooks. This chapbook, The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, includes beautiful engraved illustrations:

Roscoe, William. The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, 1807.

 

Roscoe, William. The butterfly’s ball, and the grasshopper’s feast, 1807, p. 7.

 

Our BC Historical Books collection also contains several collections of poetry. Eric Duncan’s Rural rhymes and the sheep thief begins with the following disclaimer:

Duncan, Eric. Rural rhymes and the sheep thief, 1896, p. 7.

 

Here’s the first page of the first poem from the book, “A mosquito song”:

Duncan, Eric. “A mosquito song”. From Rural rhymes and the sheep thief, 1896, p. 11.

 

If you’re interested in Japanese poetry, check out our One Hundred Poets collection. This collection contains 74 books and 20 different card sets relating to the poetry anthology Hyakunin Isshu 百人一首 (One Hundred Poets, One Poem Each). You can read more about the collection in this previous blog post.

[Kinoya Hisomaro ; illustrated by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi], [Nishikie chūiri hyakunin isshu], [1849].

 

You may also be interested in the utagaruta card sets within this collection. You can find them here, and check out our previous blog post to learn more about how this game is played.

[One hundred poets card sheets], [Meiji period [1868-1912]].

 

This month is a great time to seek out poetry readings. We found this photo of Allen Ginsberg reading at UBC in 1963:

UBC 1.1/11341-2. Holborne, Peter. Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at UBC. August 2nd, 1963. Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at UBC.

 

Finally, check out this adorable poem about a cat interrupting a game of croquet:

Playing croquet, 1875.

The Digitization Centre has digitized several collections of maps, as well as several collections that contain maps among other materials. This post provides a summary of those collections, showcasing some of our favourite maps from Open Collections!


Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Department Land Use Maps

This collection contains more than 1,800 maps of the greater Vancouver area from 1965, 1980, and 1983. There are two index maps that help to navigate the collection:

Index – Land Use Series: The numbers on this map correspond to the “Identifier” field for each map. For example, you can search within the collection for Identifier:(V92) to find maps showing the north side of UBC campus.

Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Department. Index – Land Use Series.

 

Greater Vancouver Regional District Planning Department. Land Use : U.E.L., 1979.

 

Index Map: Subdivision and Land Use Maps: This index map includes the Lower Mainland outside of Vancouver. Similarly, you can search by “Identifier” to locate the maps referenced by this index.

For more information on this collection, check out our previous blog post about it!


Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era

This collection contains Japanese maps from the Edo period, or Tokugawa period (1603-1868). The majority of the maps are rare or even unique.

Many of the maps show all or part of Japan:

Okamoto, Chikusō, active 19th century. Shinkoku Dai Nihon zenzu [Newly engraved map of Great Japan], 1865.

Utagawa, Sadahide, 1807-1873. Dai Nihon Fujisan zetchō no zu [Panoramic view of the summit of Mt. Fuji], 1857.

There are also some Japanese world maps included in the collection:

Bankoku enzu [Round map of all nations], 1675.

For a more detailed overview of this collection, see our previous blog post: Explore Open Collections: Japanese Maps of the Tokugawa Era.


Andrew McCormick Maps and Prints

This collection contains world maps dating from 1503 to 1910, with a focus on European maps and maritime exploration. Here is a selection of maps from the collection:

Moll, Herman, -1732. A map of the North Pole with all the territories that lye near it, known to us &c. according to the latest discoveries, and most exact observations, Agreeable to modern history, [1732].

Pond, Peter, 1740-1807. A map shewing the communication of the lakes and the rivers between Lake Superior and Slave Lake in North America, 1790.

 

You can read more about the collection and view other highlights in this previous blog post: Explore Open Collections: Andrew McCormick Maps and Prints.


Maps in other collections

In addition to the above three collections, there are many digital collections that contain maps along with other items.

The Chung Collection contains several maps of Canada released by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. This “sportsman’s map” of Canada shows the terrain and wildlife for different regions:

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Sportsman’s map of the Dominion of Canada, 1898.

 

This map from 1943 shows the air routes serviced by Canadian Pacific Air Lines at the time:

Canadian Pacific Air Lines. Map of Canada showing air routes, 1943.

 

In the UBC Library Digitization Centre Special Projects collection, there are over 60 maps that do not belong to other collections, including this map of southeastern Vancouver Island from 1860:

D’Heureuse, Rudolph. Map of the south-eastern districts of Vancouver Island, 1860.

 

The BC Historical Books collection is an excellent source of early British Columbia maps, like this map of the Lower Mainland:

Hill, Albert James, 1836-1918. Map of the municipalities of New Westminster city and district, British Columbia, 1889.

 

Finally, the Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books collection contains several 16th century maps, like this beautiful map of the Americas from 1588:

Ortelius, Abraham, 1527-1598. Americae sive novi orbis, nova descriptio, [1588].

You can find more maps by searching for the keyword “map” in a given collection, or by perusing the Maps genre in Open Collections.

References

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