Read the latest news on B.C. teachers’ negotiations and rallies in The Vancouver Sun’s Education News: The Report Card.

Full article here.

by Janet Steffenhagen, June 20, 2012. 12:44 pm • Section: Report Card

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

The First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) has announced DeDe DeRose’s appointment as the province’s first Superintendent of Aboriginal Achievement. 

By Katie Hyslop June 11, 2012 12:51 pm

Full Tyee article here.

© Copyright (c) TheTyee.ca

From The Vancouver Sun: Read BCTF president Susan Lambert’s letter to B.C. Principals’ and Vice-Principals’ Association‘s president Jameel Aziz regarding the teachers’ labour dispute in B.C.

Full article here.

Posted by Janet Steffenhangen,   MAY 24, 2012

jsteffenhagen@vancouversun.com

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read the latest news on a community meeting about Vancouver school issues from The Vancouver Sun. Community Meeting information here. Meeting is Tuesday, May 15 at Britannia Secondary School.

By Janet Steffenhagen  May 8, 2012. 3:59 pm • Section: Report Card

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

See the latest news on education reform, the revision of the school calendar, The School Act, and the response from the BCTF from the Tyee Newspaper The Hook Blog.

Complete The Hook blog article here.

The Tyee Education News here.

© The Tyee News

Read the latest news on the Vancouver Board of Education and the new Education budget from The Vancouver Sun here.

Vancouver Sun article by By Janet Steffenhagen, Vancouver Sun April 12, 2012

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read a North Vancouver teacher’s proposal for quality B.C. education and his opinion on the BCTF‘s action plan:

Full article from the Vancouver Sun’s Education Blog, The Report Card here.

Vancouver Sun article by Janet Steffenhagen: April 15, 2012. 3:32 pm • Section: Report CardSTAFF

© The Vancouver Sun

Is Our Education System Headed for Success or Failure?

Review the Vancouver Sun’s Education Blog The Report Card for today’s forum of the future of education in British Columbia.

The forum is free: register here.

Guest speakers: 

 

Years of failed negotiations offer government solutions, say former union leaders.

If you need proof that history repeats itself, look no further than the contract negotiations between the provincial government and the B.C. Teachers’ Federation.

Since the New Democratic Party government pushed bargaining from the local to provincial level in 1995, there’s only been one successfully negotiated teacher collective agreement.

During that period legislation has been passed, teachers have walked out, fines have been issued, and classes have been cancelled, and when negotiation time rolls around again both sides profess a desire for change, but change doesn’t happen.

The current case is Bill 22: the Education Improvement Act, which introduces a mediator to the equation, but rules any decision must meet the government’s net-zero mandate, which teachers refuse to accept.

Read The Tyee full article here.

By Katie Hyslop, 26March2012, TheTyee.ca

It is easy to talk about what could be, what should be and what other people could do.  Instead, I would like to share what I have done, and what we are trying to do, as we engage in and embrace this learning evolution.

I began my career trying to emulate the teachers I remembered most, and through the stories I remembered from my school experiences.  The teacher was mixing content, stories and weaving a narrative. While hardly an actor, there was something about the performance of teaching I really did enjoy. I would organize the desks in a circle, and while this was great for students to engage with each other, it also gave me centre stage.  I was very focussed on the lesson plan and activities in the classroom.  I saw myself as the expert, and it was up to me and the textbook to help students understand the content. Now, here is a true confession — I loved being the ‘sage on the stage’. In my Social Studies and English classes I would often retell the stories my memorable teachers had told me.

As I became more comfortable, I tried to allow students more of an opportunity to tell their stories.  I worked to create situations where students could simulate the real world.  In History class this might have been a United Nations role-play lesson, or reviewing a series of case studies in Law class. Students loved the examples drawn from the “real world”.  In Law, we would study cases making headlines in the news, and other Social Studies’ classes leant themselves ideally to current events.  I loved the relevance that came from these lessons, as well as the engagement.  Combining my lectures with hands-on activities, like putting Louis Riel on trial, led to an even richer teaching and learning experience.

Read Chris Kennedy’s article here.

By Chris Kennedy, February 22, 2012 The cultureofyes Blog

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