Bullying has long been considered a part of growing up. In recent years, however, the problem of bullying seems to have escalated. But why? Increased family dysfunction? Lax school policies? Social media? Peer group indifference? Media hype? In order to protect our children, we need to understand the issue and focus on solutions. Is eliminating bullying a realistic goal or is it more important to equip our children with the tools to avoid becoming victims?  This event took place Tuesday, September 17, 2013, in downtown Vancouver.

Moderator

Renee Filippone – Host, CBC News Vancouver Saturday and CBC News Vancouver Sunday

Panelists

Shelley Hymel – Professor, UBC Faculty of Education; Current holder of the Edith Lando Professorship in Social and Emotional Learning

Lynn Miller – Associate Professor, Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, UBC Faculty of Education

Brenda Morrison, BA’91 – Director, Centre for Restorative Justice and Associate Professor, School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University

Carol Todd, BEd’84 – Teacher; Founder, The Amanda Todd Legacy

Sherri Mohoruk – Superintendent of Safe Schools, BC Ministry of Education

Missing MomFrom the Vancouver Province:

The episodes of bullying that mar early grade school years for hundreds of children may be a partial result of the victim’s DNA, a new study suggested Wednesday.

The behaviours that most often lead to exclusion and victimization in the classroom or schoolyard have their roots in a student’s genes, the study said, arguing that children’s genetic makeup has a direct impact on the quality of the interactions they enjoy with their peers.

A research study conducted by a professor in UBC’s Faculty of Education in collaboration with UC-Riverside has found that when children engage in small acts of kindness they experience a surge in happiness, and this may help to decrease bullying.

Click here to read the Vancouver Sun article, written by The Canadian Press.

Some children are hiding their talents and skills in school for fear of being bullied, research has suggested.

Click here for the full BBC News article

As early as next month, students in the Surrey school district will be able to anonymously report bullying incidents online. The website is called Protecting Surrey Schools Together (http://www.psst-bc.ca/). 

Click here to read the full Vancouver Sun article, written by Janet Steffenhagen. 

Read the latest on The Roots of Empathy: the Ministry of Children and Family Development and the Ministry of Education’s program to teach compassion and empathy to youth and children in British Columbia.

Full article from the Province of British Columbia website here.

Read the latest news on Premier Clark’s anti-bullying strategy for BC schools: ERASE Bullying (Expect Respect And a Safe Education). Full article here.

By Katie Hyslop, 2 Jun 2012

© Copyright (c) TheTyee.ca

The Diversity and Media Toolbox is a comprehensive suite of resources for teachers, students, law enforcement representatives and the general public, that explores issues relating to stereotyping, bias and hate in mainstream media and on the Internet. The program, which includes professional development tutorials, lesson plans, interactive student modules and background articles, is divided into two distinct but complementary topic areas: media portrayals of diversity and online hate.

Teacher’s Resource Catalogue

Trousse Éducative – Diversité et Médias here.

The Diversity and Media Toolbox was produced with the support of the Government of Canada through the Department of Justice Canada’s Justice Partnership and Innovation Program.

~text from the Media Awareness Network website

Creating Caring Classrooms: How to encourage students to communicate, create, and be compassionate of others

This passionate book is about community, compassion, and creativity; it is about caring for others. It is also about helping students care about their work. Teachers will learn how to establish inclusive classrooms where kindness and concern become crucial backdrops for critical conversations. They will be introduced to simple but profound strategies that initiate and maintain respectful dialogue, promote collaboration over competition, and confront difficult issues such as bullying and exclusion.

Creating Caring Classrooms is committed to building respectful relationships among students, teachers, and the school community. Through active, engaging, relevant, open-ended activities, students will be encouraged to explore events, ideas, themes, texts, stories, and relationships from different perspectives, and then represent those new understandings in innovative and creative ways.

Authors: Kathleen Gould Lundy and Larry Swartz

Publication Date: 2011      ISBN: 9781551382708         Pages: 160

~from the Pembroke Publishers Website

UBC Library Holdings Information here.

In British Columbia, the Day of Pink 2012 is celebrated on February 29. Check out this link from the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation for more information.

DayofPink is the International Day against Bullying, Discrimination, Homophobia and Transphobia in schools and communities. We invite everyone to celebrate diversity by wearing a pink shirt and by organizing activities in their workplaces, organizations, communities and schools.

It is a day where communities across the country, and across the world, can unite in celebrating diversity and raising awareness to stop homophobic, transphobic & all forms of bullying. 

The International Day of Pink (April 11) was started in Nova Scotia when 2 straight high school students saw a gay student wearing a pink shirt being bullied. The 2 students intervened, but wanted to do more to prevent homophobic & transphobic bulling. They decided to purchase pink shirts, and a few days later got everyone at school to arrive  wearing pink, standing in solidarity. The result was that an entire school stopped homophobic & transphobic bullying. 

The message was clear: anyone can bully, any can be victimized by bullying, but together we can stop it.

Why should you participate?

Have you ever seen a friend hurt because of discrimination? Have you been hurt yourself? Discrimination comes in many forms including racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, agism and anti-semitism just to name a few. These social diseases create barriers, bullying, harassment, hate and violence. No one should have to experience the negativity created by discrimination. DayofPink is more than just a symbol of a shared belief in celebrating diversity – it’s also a commitment to being open minded, accepting differences and learning to respect each other.

~from the Day of Pink.org Website

Day of Pink Guidebook 2012

CKNW’s Pink Shirt Day Website

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