MMIWG Selected Titles

  1. Stolen Sisters: the story of two missing girls, their families, and how Canada has failed Indigenous Women by Emmannuelle Walter

In 2014, the nation was rocked by the brutal violence against young Aboriginal women Loretta Saunders, Tina Fontaine and Rinelle Harper. But tragically, they were not the only Aboriginal women to suffer that year. In fact, an official report revealed that since 1980, 1,200 Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or have gone missing. This alarming official figure reveals a national tragedy and the systemic failure of law enforcement and of all levels of government to address the issue.

Journalist Emmanuelle Walter spent two years investigating this crisis and has crafted a moving representative account of the disappearance of two young women, Maisy Odjick and Shannon Alexander, teenagers from western Quebec, who have been missing since September 2008. Via personal testimonies, interviews, press clippings and official documents, Walter pieces together the disappearance and loss of these two young lives, revealing these young women to us through the voices of family members and witnesses.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Highway of Tears a film by Matt Smiley

Highway of Tears‘ is about the missing or murdered women along a 724 kilometer stretch of highway in northern British Columbia. None of the 18 cold-cases since the 1960’s had been solved, until project E-Pana (a special division of the RCMP) managed to link DNA to Portland drifter, Bobby Jack Fowler with the 1974 murder of 16 year-old hitchhiker, Colleen MacMillen. In Canada, over 600 Aboriginal women have been reported missing or been murdered since the 1960s. Viewers will discover what the effects of generational poverty, residential schools, systemic violence, and high unemployment rates have done to First Nations reserves and how they tie in with the missing and murdered women in the Highway of Tearscases. Aboriginal women are considered abject victims of violence. Now find out what First Nations leaders are doing to try and swing the pendulum in the other direction.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Injustice in Indian Country: Jurisdiction, American Law, and Sexual Violence Against Native Women by Amy L. Casselman

Living at the intersection of multiple identities in the United States can be dangerous. This is especially true for Native women who live on the more than 56 million acres that comprise America’s Indian country – the legal term for American Indian reservations and other land held in trust for Native people. Today, due to a complicated system of criminal jurisdiction, non-Native Americans can commit crimes against American Indians in much of Indian country with virtual impunity. This has created what some call a modern day ‘hunting ground’ in which Native women are specifically targeted by non-Native men for sexual violence. In this urgent and timely book, author Amy L. Casselman exposes the shameful truth of how the American government has systematically divested Native nations of the basic right to protect the people in their own communities. A problem over 200 years in the making, Casselman highlights race and gender in federal law to challenge the argument that violence against Native women in Indian country is simply collateral damage from a complex but necessary legal structure. Instead, she demonstrates that what’s happening in Indiancountry is part of a violent colonial legacy – one that has always relied on legal and sexual violence to disempower Native communities as a whole. Injustice in Indian Country tells the story of American colonization through the eyes of Native women as they fight for justice. In doing so, it makes critical contributions to the fields of American law and policy, social justice and activism, women’s studies, ethnic studies, American Indian studies, and sociology.

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  1. Will I see? by Davis A. Robertson; illustrated by GMB Chomichuk

May, a young teenage girl, traverses the city streets, finding keepsakes in different places along her journey. When May and her kookum make these keepsakes into a necklace, it opens a world of danger and fantasy. While May fights against a terrible reality, she learns that there is strength in the spirit of those that have passed. But will that strength be able to save her? A story of tragedy and beauty, Will I See illuminates the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Based on the story by Iskwé and Erin Leslie.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Sans Nimama by Melanie Florence; illustrated by Francois Thisdale

A young mother, one of the many missing indigenous women, watches over her small daughter as she grows up without her nimama. Together, but separated, they experience important milestones: the first day of school, first dance, first date, a wedding, and new life. A free-verse story of love, loss, and acceptance told in alternating voices, Missing Nimama shows the human side of a national tragedy. An afterword by the author provides a simple, age-appropriate context for young readers.

Find me at UBC Library

 

  1. Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The National Inquiry’s Final Report reveals that persistent and deliberate human and Indigenous rights violations and abuses are the root cause behind Canada’s staggering rates of violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people. The two volume report calls for transformative legal and social changes to resolve the crisis that has devastated Indigenous communities across the country.
The Final Report is comprised of the truths of more than 2,380 family members, survivors of violence, experts and Knowledge Keepers shared over two years of cross-country public hearings and evidence gathering. It delivers 231 individual Calls for Justice directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.
As documented in the Final Report, testimony from family members and survivors of violence spoke about a surrounding context marked by multigenerational and intergenerational trauma and marginalization in the form of poverty, insecure housing or homelessness and barriers to education, employment, health care and cultural support. Experts and Knowledge Keepers spoke to specific colonial and patriarchal policies that displaced women from their traditional roles in communities and governance and diminished their status in society, leaving them vulnerable to violence.

Find the report online

 

Upcoming: we are currently developing a MMIWG research guide

 

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Andrea Groban-Oakunsheyld for allowing us to use their image in this spotlight series.

Xwi7xwa would like to thank Elena Pederson, Publications & Web Services Assistant, from UBC Education Library for her work on designing our digital signage.

Buses, SkyTrain, SeaBus, and the West Coast Express are the main transit options in the Greater Vancouver area today. However, Open Collections has many images of the railroads and streetcars that used to line our streets. From 1897 until 1958, the British Columbia Electric Railway (BCER) operated streetcars and interurbans, which were the major transportation options for people at that time.

Granville St., Vancouver, B.C., Post office, bank commerce & depot, [between 1908 and 1911?].

Brief History of Streetcars and Interurbans in BC

The first streetcar services in BC began in Victoria, operated by the National Electric Tramway and Lighting Company Ltd., in February 1890. Four months later, the first regular streetcar service was started in Vancouver by Vancouver Electric Railway and Light Company Ltd. By October 1891, the service area was expanded to New Westminster by the Westminster and Vancouver Tramway Company. The company also launched Canada’s longest interurban line between Vancouver and New Westminster. Eventually, the three companies merged as the British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited (BCER) on April 3, 1897, and started to manage all of the transportation services.

Map and guide to Vancouver street car and interurban lines, 1923.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Tips for tourists: interurban trips over B.C. Electric Railway system, in vicinity of Vancouver, British Columbia, [1913?].

The following are photographs depicting streetcars in BC from the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

Park Drive, Grand View, [between 1903 and 1908?].

[View of a trolley car on Davie Street, Vancouver], [between 1900 and 1910?].

[Sketch of interior of Main Street streetcar, Vancouver, B.C.], [not after 1914].

 

You can also find interurban lines in the BC Historical Books Collection:

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. British Columbia Electric Railway Co. Ltd. : N.E.L.A. Convention, Seattle, June 10-14, 1912, [1912].

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. B.C. Electric Handbook and Directory, 1929.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Tips for tourists: interurban trips over B.C. Electric Railway system, in vicinity of Vancouver, British Columbia, [1913?].

Observation Streetcars

Around 1909, BCER purchased the designs of open-air sightseeing cars from the Montreal Tramways Company and constructed the cars in New Westminster. Thadeous (Teddy) Sylvester Lyons was a popular tour conductor, known for his wit and jokes while operating this service until it stopped running in 1950.

[B.C. Electric Railway Co. tour conducted by Ted Lyons, Vancouver, B.C.], [between 1923 and 1949?].

UBC Motor Buses

Motor buses were the main transit option for students and employees heading to UBC. In Carrying the People ([1929]) by British Columbia Electric Railway Company, UBC was considered the busiest route:

The U.B.C. Rush

Consider the problem of the University. Between 8 o’clock and 9.15 in the morning, transportation is required for more than fifteen hundred students and no sooner is this accomplished than the traffic falls off to nothing. In the afternoon the same surge occurs in the opposite direction and then zero in traffic again. […] There is no busier spot in Vancouver than this transfer point as the University rush is at its height each morning. (pp.7-8)

UBC 93.1/18. University bus, 1926.

British Columbia Electric Railway Company. Carrying the People, [1929].

The End of Streetcars/Interurbans Services

Around the time of the Second World War, the BCER streetcar and interurban services were approaching their end due to the high cost of maintaining the train tracks. The BCER decided to do “Rails-to-Rubbers” conversion throughout the entire transit system, changing from streetcars using tracks to buses with rubber tires.

The final run of Vancouver’s streetcar was in 1955. The last interurban car ran between Marpole and Steveston on February 28, 1958, and the rail passenger service by BCER ended.

Ever since the BC government took over the BCER in 1961, we have used “rubber” buses and automated trains as our primary transportation tools in BC. At UBC Vancouver campus, there are 15 bus routes to Metro Vancouver and two routes serving on-campus areas today.

UBC 1.1/15762. Students boarding bus in front of Home Economics Building, 1971.

 

If you want to explore more materials about BC transportation history, please visit our Open Collections.

References

Ya Min Wu has worked at UBC Library for the last five years. But his experience working with Chinese rare books goes back even earlier.

“Before I came to Canada [in 2001], I worked in a public library in China, Liaoning Provincial Library. I was there for about 15 years,” he says. “I primarily worked on the Chinese rare books, so I have lots of time spent on rare books authentication, cataloguing and some preservation.”

Moving from China to Canada with his family, he switched tracks to work in business and manufacturing in Vancouver for the next decade before returning to library work at a small company in Burnaby that provided library services to the Richmond, Burnaby and Vancouver Public Libraries. Later, when an opportunity came up to work at UBC Library, he joined the Technical Services team in 2014 to work with Chinese language materials.

“UBC has a great Chinese rare book collection. It’s a huge collection, outside China,” he says, noting that the entire collection includes about 4,000 titles in 60,000 volumes, making UBC a top-tier research library for Chinese Studies in North America.

One of his first major projects at the library was to work on Discovering Modern China, a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) project that involved close collaboration between UBC’s Asian Library and the University of Washington East Asia Library to catalogue large volumes of valuable but hidden scholarly material: “At Asian Library there are lots of uncatalogued materials that have not been touched before. We worked very hard, together with some student assistants and Asian Library’s Chinese Studies Librarian to originally catalogue more than 1,000 items in one year.”

In 2018, the library got funding support through donors to work on the Puban Collection, UBC’s largest Chinese rare books collection, consisting of 45,000 volumes spanning subject fields like history, literature, philology and philosophy. Ya Min’s work is now centered on the Puban Collection, both cataloguing the collection and planning for its future storage, preservation, conservation and digitization.

“The project is focused on how to organize and make the Puban Collection support teaching and research. For the past 60 years, the collection has helped to make UBC Asian Studies one of the best in the world,” he says. “So how can it benefit new students in the future? This is the project.”

In honour of the 60th anniversary of the Library’s acquisition of the Puban Collection in 1959, Ya Min Wu will be hosting bi-weekly tours highlighting items from the collection at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections. Learn more about the tours.

The Strategic Framework will guide the future work and strategic direction for the library, in alignment with the UBC Strategic Plan.

June is recognized as Aboriginal History Month but at UBC Library we hold a tradition of (Un)History Month — a celebration and acknowledgement of the importance of Indigenous Peoples – not only in history – but in the present and future.

KOREAN

JC423 K878 2017
생태 민주주의 : 모두 의 평화 를 위한 정치적 상상력 / 구 도완 지음

PL994.415 A37 K35 2018
칼자국 / 김 애란 소설 ; 정 수지 그림

PL994.415 Y664 A62 2018
아침 에는 죽음 을 생각 하는 것 이 좋다 / 김 영민

PL994.9 S58 U75 2018
우리가 보낸 가장 긴 밤 : 이석원 산문


CHINESE

DS735 Z436 2018
掌故. 第三集 / 主编, 徐俊

DS795.8 F67 W29 2019
哇! 故宮的二十四节气 / 故宮博物院宣传教育部编

ND1048 S46 2018
烟霞丘壑 : 中国古代画家和他们的世界 / 尚刚著

PL1271 W269 2018
漢語核心詞的歷史與現状研究 / 汪維輝著

PL2278 M464 2018
浮出历史地表 : 现代妇女文学研究 / 孟悦, 戴锦华著

PL2303 X8953 2018
许子东现代文学课 / 许子东著

PL2852 T47 M36 2018
漫游者 / 朱天心.

PN2062 Z46 2018
MPA三嘆 : 向大師史坦尼斯拉夫斯基致敬 / 鍾明德著

TR680 T533 2018
一站一坐一生 : 一个中国人62年的影像志 / 仝冰雪著


JAPANESE

PL788.4 G43 H573 2018
古代物語としての源氏物語 / 廣田収

PL819 O8 Z46 2018
私の生い立ち / 与謝野晶子著

PL865 A59 Z75 2018
山崎豊子先生の素顔 / 野上孝子著

PS3615 T88 W48163 2018
あのころ, 天皇は神だった / ジュリー・オオツカ ; 小竹由美子訳

This year for the seventh annual Indigenous (Un)History Month the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre invites you to participate in various events across UBC campus from June 1st to August 31st.

 

What is Indigenous (Un)History month?

Indigenous (Un)History Month, formerly Aboriginal (Un)History Month, began in 2011. Every year a new exhibit is created to:

  • celebrate Aboriginal creativity, scholarship, and intellectual traditions,
  • cultivate conversations about relationship, representation and recognition,
  • inspire participants to be better informed about the Indigenous lands and 
peoples of whom we are guests

 

For more information on Indigenous (Un)History Month and past exhibit click here and here.

For information on the exhibit and directions click here.

For information on RavenSpace click here.

 

UBC Library is pleased to announce that Sarah Blay, Katherine Hill, Paul Lesack and Lorne Madgett are the 2019 recipients of UBC Library Awards. Each year, the Library Awards Program shines a light on those employees who have demonstrated exceptional creativity, innovation, leadership, excellence and a dedication to customer service through their work.

The awards were presented at the annual Library Recognition Luncheon at the Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre on May 28, 2019. Congratulations Sarah, Katherine, Paul and Lorne, and thank you to everyone who participated by submitting nominations.

Sarah Blay

Sarah Blay (Program and Administrative Assistant, Koerner Library) is the winner of our newest award, introduced this year. The 2019 UBC Library Leadership From Within (aka the Gumption) Award recognizes employees who do not have supervisory responsibilities. Recipients of this award consistently demonstrate leadership through their ability to inspire engagement in others, while exemplifying the Library’s values. They step up to fulfill a need either themselves or by motivating others or teams.

Sarah brings a welcoming team approach and works from a place of inclusion. She ensures everyone in the Research Commons space knows each other and feels welcomed and included. She also stepped up to help out when others were unexpectedly away at a crucial time.

Katherine Hill

Katherine Hill (Circulation and Office Manager, Woodward Library) earned the Employee Excellence Award, which recognizes a Library employee who consistently demonstrates their commitment to making an impact on the Library by making it a better workplace for all through living our values and behaviors.

In everything she does, Katherine works to create an exceptional workplace environment. She is known as a go-to person across the Library, sharing her knowledge widely and helping colleagues in other units get up to speed. She brings patience, creativity, humour, and solution-oriented support to each workplace experience.

Paul Lesack

Paul Lesack (Data/GIS Analyst, Koerner Library) is the winner of the Unsung Hero Award, which recognizes a Library employee or team who keep our libraries running, delivering its services, collections and operations. Their efforts help UBC Library to effectively deliver the stellar service that users have come to expect.

Paul has become the backbone of critical support for UBC’s complex network of campus-wide interdisciplinary data need. His unsung work can be seen at the core of many research projects, including his work with the Vancouver Aquarium to create digital, manipulatable versions of the original paper maps. These maps have become essential to researchers who are currently working to daylight once hidden streams.

Lorne Madgett

Lorne Madgett (e-Resources & Access Library Specialist, Collections Services) is the winner of the Innovation Award, which recognizes a Library employee who has demonstrated new ways of performing existing processes or has introduced a new library service or program that is beneficial to Library employees and/or users.

Lorne has demonstrated the ability to work with people at all levels of the organization and supply chain, earning the respect and loyalty of his unit members, other technical services staff, branch liaisons and Library administration. His curiosity and desire to problem solve inspires an unhesitant quest to ask questions and find answers through peers, online tools and other experts.

The post 2019 employee Recognition Award winners announced appeared first on About UBC Library.

         

Xwi7xwa Library invites Congress attendees to view selections from our extensive Indigenous film collection. A detailed list of the film schedule is now available:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screenings will be held in the Seminar Room at Xwi7xwa Library, June 3-7th, between 10am and 4pm.

 

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