Sing Tao Weekly features The Chung Collection.

February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

February 12 is Family Day in British Columbia. While this statutory holiday was created in BC in 2013, falling on the second Monday every February, it has existed in other parts of Canada for even longer.

The very first province to observe Family Day as a statutory holiday was Alberta in 1990, when Family Day was created to give people the opportunity to spend time with their loved ones.

To celebrate the date, we’ve brought you some of our favorite family pictures from our collections.

 

When it comes to building families, often everything starts with a wedding.

[Chinese family wedding], 1940

 

Then, comes the kids

[Two boys dressed as sailors], 1940

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain, 1925-35?

 

Sometimes, several kids

[French family with ten children], 1920-29?

 

But there’s always space for one more

[Photograph depicting a family], 1879

 

Happy Family Day!

Shigetaka Sasaki family

 

F. K. Hare and family, 1968

 

The history behind the photos

Two boys dressed as sailors: the photo is part of an album from a Vancouver family. The album contains several registries from family’s travels across British Columbia and the United States, while also showcasing their life in Vancouver.

Bill Ciss, Elsie and Babe up Grouse Mountain: the photo is part of an unknown family album from our Uno Langmann Collection. There are photos from British Columbia or Alberta and other locations not identified.

French family with ten children: the photo depicts a French family traveling on the Duchess of Bedford cruise of the Canadian Pacific Railways.

Shigetaka Sasaki family: Steve Shigetaka Sasaki was the top judoka in his province in Japan before he immigrated to Canada in 1922. He was the founder of the Vancouver Judo Club (Taiku Iku Dojo) and was known as the “Father of Judo in Canada”.

F. K. Hare and family: Frederick Kenneth Hare was a meteorologist and environmentalist. Hare was also the fifth president of the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

If you are interested in getting to know more about our collections, the Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs have a lot of family photos from 1850s to the 1950s. You will be amazed to see those pictures, as we were.

 

Sources:

British Columbians reflect on the meaning of Family Day (CBC News)

F. Kenneth Hare (Science)

Family Day in Canada (Time and Date)

Former UBC president Kenneth Hare remembered (UBC)

History of Judo in Canada (Vernon Judo Club)

Shigetaka (Steve) Sasaki Family Fonds (Nikkei Museum)

The 2018 Winter Olympics are starting this week! They are going to be hosted by PyeongChang in South Korea, beginning on February 9, 2018. For 16 days, we will see the best winter sports athletes in the world compete for gold.

To get into the sportive spirit, we selected a few materials from our collection that show off some of the Olympic winter sports.

 

Freestyle skiing 

An advertisement from our Chung Collection: 

Banff-Lake Louise region Canadian Rockies via Canadian Pacific, 1941

 

Ice hockey 

A photograph from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Hockey players, Ritz brothers, 1939

 

Bobsleigh

A selection from a family album in our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

[Group on sled], 1928

Curling

An action shot from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Pharmacy dean Bernard Riedel curling, 1979

 

Skating

A photograph from our Uno Langmann Family Collection of British Columbia Photographs:

Skating on Trout Lake, Vancouver, B.C., 1925

 

While researching images for this post, we found plenty of other materials involving outdoor activities in winter. While these activities may not be Olympic sports, they are certainly a workout.

 

Snowshoeing, from our H. Bullock-Webster Fonds:

December – soft snow – misery, 1880

 

Snow shoveling, from our UBC Archives Photograph Collection:

Youth Training School snow shoveling, 1951

 

Grab your mittens and get ready to cheer on your favorite athletes, because the Winter Olympics only come once every four years.

You have probably walked by it, maybe even seen a sign or poster inviting you in, but if you haven’t yet discovered the magic that is Rare Books & Special Collections located on Level 1 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, you are missing out. Rare Books & Special Collections houses significant collections of rare books, archival materials, historic maps and photographs and it’s open to all UBC students, staff and faculty and the general public.

The collection is extensive, and it would take several lifetimes to see the all the treasures available to you as a UBC student so, we’ve created a list of highlights to use when you stop by for a visit.

Here are five items to see before you graduate.  

The first item ever printed in the city of Vancouver

photo of the front page of the Vancouver weekly herald and North pacific news

 

The first edition of The Vancouver Weekly Herald and North Pacific News was published on Friday, January 15, 1886 when the population of Vancouver hovered at about 1000. This is the only surviving copy of Vancouver’s first newspaper and it provides amazing insight into what was happening in the city at that time. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Ads

Banff Lake Louise Region Canadian pacific railway ad with illustration of a skier

 

Maybe some of the most iconic pieces of Canadiana, our vibrant Canadian Pacific Railway advertisements are a must-see for anyone interested in art and design. The posters, that were created out of the C.P.R.’s silkscreen studio in Montreal, are part of our Chung Collection that holds one of the largest research collections on the Canadian Pacific Railway Company as well as a huge collection of Chinese Canadian historical content. Dr. Chung was first inspired to collect items on the subject of the Canadian Pacific Railway company when as a young boy he saw a poster of the Empress of Asia in his father’s tailor shop.  His collection started modestly, with newspaper clippings and scrapbooks, but has now grown to thousands of rare and sometimes unique items.

Letters written and signed by Darwin. Yes, that Darwin.

Letter written by Charles Darwin

 

Two of our most exciting collections at RBSC are collections of letters written to and by Charles Darwin, the well-known evolutionary biologist and originator of the concept of natural selection. The image above is from a group of about forty letters written between Charles Darwin and John Scott Burdon Sanderson from 1873 to 1881 and deal with the research Darwin and Burdon Sanderson were conducting on the digestive powers and leaf movements of insect-eating plants. Darwin published the results of this research as part of his book Insectivorous Plants (1875).

The Dali Alice

First page of the Dali Alice

 

Surrealist artist Salvador Dali’s interpretation of Lewis Carroll’s classic, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a literary and artistic treasure that is not to be missed. You can even take a closer look at the original woodcut remarques (a small vignette image in the margin of a print, often related thematically to the main image) that are stored in a linen and leather case.

A model of Douglas Coupland’s Digital Orca

model of digital orca sculpture by Douglas Coupland

 

If you live Vancouver, you’ve undoubtedly seen the stunning 25-foot-tall sculpture of the Digital Orca next to the Vancouver Convention Centre. The powder coated aluminum sculpture built on a stainless steel frame was created by Canadian novelist and artist Douglas Coupland in 2009. You can take closer look at the Digital Orca at Rare Books & Special Collections, but on a much smaller scale; the model of the sculpture is just one of the many interesting items in the Douglas Coupland fonds.

Join us for a VIP tour of Rare Books & Special Collections on Wednesday February 14 at 11 a.m. Reserve your spot.

 

You have probably walked by it, maybe even seen a sign or poster inviting you in, but if you haven’t yet discovered the magic that is Rare Books & Special Collections located on Level 1 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, you are missing out. Rare Books & Special Collections houses significant collections of rare books, archival materials, historic maps and photographs and it’s open to all UBC students, staff and faculty and the general public.

The collection is extensive, and it would take several lifetimes to see the all the treasures available to you as a UBC student so, we’ve created a list of highlights to use when you stop by for a visit.

Here are five items to see before you graduate.  

The first item ever printed in the city of Vancouver

photo of the front page of the Vancouver weekly herald and North pacific news

 

The first edition of The Vancouver Weekly Herald and North Pacific News was published on Friday, January 15, 1886 when the population of Vancouver hovered at about 1000. This is the only surviving copy of Vancouver’s first newspaper and it provides amazing insight into what was happening in the city at that time. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Ads

Banff Lake Louise Region Canadian pacific railway ad with illustration of a skier

 

Maybe some of the most iconic pieces of Canadiana, our vibrant Canadian Pacific Railway advertisements are a must-see for anyone interested in art and design. The posters, that were created out of the C.P.R.’s silkscreen studio in Montreal, are part of our Chung Collection that holds one of the largest research collections on the Canadian Pacific Railway Company as well as a huge collection of Chinese Canadian historical content. Dr. Chung was first inspired to collect items on the subject of the Canadian Pacific Railway company when as a young boy he saw a poster of the Empress of Asia in his father’s tailor shop.  His collection started modestly, with newspaper clippings and scrapbooks, but has now grown to thousands of rare and sometimes unique items.

Letters written and signed by Darwin. Yes, that Darwin.

Letter written by Charles Darwin

 

Two of our most exciting collections at RBSC are collections of letters written to and by Charles Darwin, the well-known evolutionary biologist and originator of the concept of natural selection. The image above is from a group of about forty letters written between Charles Darwin and John Scott Burdon Sanderson from 1873 to 1881 and deal with the research Darwin and Burdon Sanderson were conducting on the digestive powers and leaf movements of insect-eating plants. Darwin published the results of this research as part of his book Insectivorous Plants (1875).

The Dali Alice

First page of the Dali Alice

 

Surrealist artist Salvador Dali’s interpretation of Lewis Carroll’s classic, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a literary and artistic treasure that is not to be missed. You can even take a closer look at the original woodcut remarques (a small vignette image in the margin of a print, often related thematically to the main image) that are stored in a linen and leather case.

A model of Douglas Coupland’s Digital Orca

model of digital orca sculpture by Douglas Coupland

 

If you live Vancouver, you’ve undoubtedly seen the stunning 25-foot-tall sculpture of the Digital Orca next to the Vancouver Convention Centre. The powder coated aluminum sculpture built on a stainless steel frame was created by Canadian novelist and artist Douglas Coupland in 2009. You can take closer look at the Digital Orca at Rare Books & Special Collections, but on a much smaller scale; the model of the sculpture is just one of the many interesting items in the Douglas Coupland fonds.

Join us for a VIP tour of Rare Books & Special Collections on Wednesday February 14 at 11 a.m. Reserve your spot.

 

We are pleased to present the Digitization Centre Impact and Activity Report for 2016-2017!

This report highlights the Digitization Centre’s key projects, partnerships and user engagement trends for the 2016-2017 fiscal year.

In 2016-2017, Open Collections accounted for 15% of the Library’s unique pageviews. That 15% totals 3.9 million pageviews on Open Collections alone!

The breakdown of where those 3.9 million pageviews were spent.

Other highlights detailed in the report:

  • Our work with Archivematica and our continued contributions to UBC Library’s digital preservation program
  • News about our web archiving work, including updates on some of our new collections
  • The Digital Himalaya Project being done in collaboration with Mark Turin (Chair, First Nations & Endangered Languages Program; Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology)
  • Our ongoing partnerships
  • Our efforts on metadata updating and cleaning

 

  

New additions to our digital collections included:

BC Sessional Papers

Phase IV of the BC Sessional papers was completed, adding material from the Legislative Council of British Columbia from 1933 to 1952. Phase V began in May of 2017.

Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection

A selection of 23 titles from the Harry Hawthorn Fly Fishing and Angling Collection housed at Woodward Library.

Rainbow Ranche

An archival collection from the Lake Country Museum and Archives, chronicling one of the first independent fruit ranches in the Okanagan.

The Pedestal

Canada’s first feminist periodical was fully digitized in partnership with SFU Archives and will be available through Open Collections soon.

Journal of a voyage to the Pacific and American Shores

UBC Library acquired and digitized the journal of Susannah Weynton, wife of the captain of the Hudson’s Bay Company supply ship Cowlitz.

BC Historical Newspapers

The BC Newspapers collection was completed this year. Encompassing 163 titles, these newspapers are utilized by researchers around the world. All pages have been run through OCR (optical character recognition) and are full-text searchable.

To learn more about what we’ve been up to over the past few years, check out all of our Impact Reports dating back to 2011 under the “Reports” section of our website’s Documentation page. Many thanks to all of our partners over the past years. We look forward to continued collaboration on all of our current and future projects!

The Chung Collection within Open Collections is known for its variety of photos and subjects. Recently, we took a journey through the menus within the collection- here are a few for your enjoyment:


 

 

Does anyone know what the first a la carte menu item- “Chow Chow- 15” is? I’d be willing to try it for fifteen cents.


 

The “Degree of Sweetness” for the wines in this roomservice menu raise more questions than they answer–why only sweetness? Why is the scale 0-3?


 

This type-written menu went to press a bit too early, and Chocolate Jelly had to be removed. (I would have rather had the Cheese Cakes, myself)


 

The steamship service menu in 1930 seems amazing! Not to besmirch the White Spot restaurants on the BC Ferries, but….


 

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