For over a century, there has been a rather curious and unique public lecture event happening every Saturday evening at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

 

From its humble beginnings in 1916, the Vancouver Institute (VI) has been holding free public lectures presented by locally, nationally and internationally recognized, distinguished scholars and notable industry professionals alike from UBC and beyond.

 

Spanning several decades now, the VI lectures’ collection (made available by the UBC Library in partnership with the VI) is steadily growing in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository. This one-of-a-kind mixed collection of audio and video materials is a fine testament to the historical, scientific, technical and academic knowledge, expertise and wisdom accumulated by the VI speakers over the years.

 

The VI lectures’ collection is teeming with a wide range of scientific, archaeological and other intriguing discoveries to philosophical musings and historical biographies to politics, policies and opinions to advanced technologies in education, medicine, and just about everything else in between.

 

This treasure trove of knowledge consists of novel, creative and innovative ideas and notions to the hard-knock school of lessons learned through good (and, at times, not so good), old-fashioned trial and error. Since then, the array of topics presented by past and current VI speakers were, and still are to this day, all-engaging, funny, illuminating, candid and as inspiring as ever.

 

A round of applause is due to Green College at UBC for its administrative management of the VI lectures over the years and transferred seamlessly over to the new Global Reporting Centre on January 1, 2018.

 

Another round of applause goes to University Archives for digitizing the vast majority of the VI lectures, the individual materials are continuing to be digitized and made openly accessible in the VI lectures’ collection in cIRcle via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal.

 

While waiting for upcoming VI lectures, below are some past and present VI lectures to watch now online anytime and anywhere:

 

The next 50 years in engineering http://hdl.handle.net/2429/36288

 

Gold or dross — The romantic past and future potential of B.C.’s mineral wealth http://hdl.handle.net/2429/19745

 

The golden age of astronomy http://hdl.handle.net/2429/15122

 

Ecological reserves in British Columbia http://hdl.handle.net/2429/30981

 

An evening with Mary Hemingway http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20033

 

Life under the sun: The past and future of solar energy http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20760

 

Artists in medieval workshops http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20769

 

Observations and photographs http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20044

 

Virginia Woolf: a personal portrait http://hdl.handle.net/2429/34467

 

Einstein — the man and his work http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35297

 

The coinage of Athens and the ancient world http://hdl.handle.net/2429/35868

 

The mystique of the detective story http://hdl.handle.net/2429/20819

 

Byzantine archaeology: a city revealed http://hdl.handle.net/2429/34338

 

Leonard Cohen: “The only tourist in Havana” http://hdl.handle.net/2429/13026

 

Dogs and people: The history and psychology of a relationship http://hdl.handle.net/2429/32808

 

Dealing with SARS http://hdl.handle.net/2429/32104

 

Journey of the Blue Whale http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61793

 

Digital Dumping Ground : The Global Trade in Electronic Waste http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61570

 

The Human-Animal Bond : Our History With Dogs http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61571

 

Desert Dust and the World’s Environments http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61150

 

Hammering the Klavier : Beethoven’s Earthshaking and Bone-crushing Masterpiece http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62270

 

Media Ethics on the Digital Frontier http://hdl.handle.net/2429/61152

 

Bug Shells and Butterfly Wings : New Materials Inspired by Nature http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62080

 

Stroke : New Evidence on Prevention and Recovery http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62337

 

Cheap : The High Cost of Discount Culture http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62344

 

Let Them Eat Dirt : Raising Children With Their Microbes http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62338

 

Bee Time : What Can We Learn from the Demise of Bees? http://hdl.handle.net/2429/62335

 

 

Mary-Lou Florian, one of Canada's most esteemed conservation scientists makes her most recent book available through UBC's Open Collections.

 

Mary-Lou Florian, Research Associate Emerita at the Royal British Columbia Museum, recipient of the 125th Commemorative Medal from the Governor-General of Canada and UBC alumna has made her new book, Comparative Anatomy of Branches, Roots and Wood of Some North American Dicotyledonous and Coniferous Trees and Woody Shrubs Used in Ethnographic Artifacts: Identification and Conservation Concerns available through UBC’s cIRcle Digital Repository.

After retiring in 1991 from her position as Chief of Conservation Services for the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, Florian has devoted her time to research and writing – publishing several books related to the conservation of museum objects. 

Keen to make her research more widely available, Florian approached UBC Library to make her new book available through its Open Collections. “I thank the University of British Columbia cIRcle Digital Repository for accepting my book. I am incredibly pleased the information will be available for anyone interested. An author could not wish anything more,” she said.

A comparative anatomy of tissues that were used historically in making ethnographic and archaeological artifacts, Florian hopes the book will be useful as a lab manual for teaching and reference for research, not only for ethnographic reasons, but also for many aspects of plant anatomy and identification and forestry.

“We are thrilled to provide open access to Mary-Lou’s latest book,” said Amber Saundry, Digital Repository Librarian at UBC Library, “In a short amount of time, we’ve seen strong use and interest in its specialized and unique information from conservators, curators, researchers and educators. We look forward to welcoming her future work to UBC Library via cIRcle and Open Collections“.

There is much excitement in the conservation community about the new-found accessibility of Florian’s research, “This book will be extremely useful for conservators and other collections professionals working with baskets, bark and other ethnographic materials,” says Eric Pourchot, Institutional Advancement Director at the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation, “Thank you for making her research available.” 

Anne Lama, UBC’s Library Conservator is thrilled to have access to Florian’s new book, especially after encountering Florian’s research so often during her studies in the restoration of books and paper and preventive conservation at the University Paris-Sorbonne as well as her work at the National Archives in Paris. “I am thrilled she is still publishing and sharing her findings,” said Lama.

Lama expects to use the book often in her work at UBC Library. “I will be able to learn a lot from this research and it will be an excellent reference when making recommendations about the conservations of objects in our collections”.

cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository for published and unpublished material produced by the UBC community and its partners was created to showcase and preserve intellectual output, and support teaching, learning, and research activities. Items in cIRcle are presented through UBC Library’s Open Collections, which provides additional features that increase the findability and promotion of research. Items can be found via search engines (such as Google) and have permanent URLs and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), so they can be discovered, accessed, and preserved long-term for future generations.

Borrow Mary-Lou Florian’s books.

More about Open Access at UBC Library.

sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

sojourners-logo

For seven years, the journal has showcased exemplary papers written by students with a sociological perspective. Contributing to the journal affords students an invaluable opportunity to have their work published early in their academic careers.

– A Message from the Sojourners’  Co-editors in Chief

 

After a year in the making, it is a pleasure to announce the arrival of Sojourners in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository!

 

BACKGROUND

In the words of first Editor-in-Chief of Sojourners, Sierra Skye Gemma, this young journal began as “a simple idea”. It was dubbed “the journal” – “a student proposal to provide a venue for the publication of outstanding undergraduate writing in Sociology”.

Not only did this become evident early on (in fact, in 2008), “the Sociology Students Association transformed this idea into a reality by voting to make “the journal” one of the Association’s central projects in that school year”.

First came the planning, followed by the submission, review, editing process. With the major undertaking of a successful fundraising campaign much to the credit of Maureen Mendoza, “you as, the Reader, would not be reading this first issue”, noted Gemma.

Due to the overwhelming student response back then, the journal article submissions were from many UBC departments and included book reviews whereby many “donated their time and talents to the journal”.

While traveling through the unfamiliar world of academic publishing, the Sojourners’ authors wanted to “provide [their] readers with the opportunity to take a sociological sojourn in unknown places, (sub)cultures, and realms of thought”.

So, with a number of articles from Volume 1 to the present day, the Sojourners’ journal highlights both timely and topical subjects involved when studying and researching the world of sociology and its influence whether it be on people, (sub)cultures and perceptions as seen through the eyes UBC’s undergraduate students.

“The articles span the globe, with Connor Cavanagh focusing on famine in Zimbabwe and Michael Kehl deliberating on the effects of the “Three Strikes” law in California. They also address a wide range of topics, from Manori Ravindran’s consideration of postfeminism and the pop music phenomenon of The Spice Girls to Hélène Frohard-Dourlent’s analysis of the impact of socioeconomic status on children’s success in school.”

With such support, Sojourners will surely continue to be published for many years to come.

 

QUICK FACTS

Sojourners (an undergraduate Journal of Sociology) is a peer and Faculty reviewed journal published annually by the Sociology Students Association of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.

‘While Sojourners provides a platform for the dissemination of sociological undergraduate work, it is not department-specific and its articles span the globe’.

NOTE: Submissions are accepted in the fall of each year.

 

VIEW/DOWNLOAD

Full-text and openly accessible Volumes 1, 2, 3/4, 5 and 6 &7 of Sojourners (and future volumes) via cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

8016172703_918813b448_z

Open data (scrabble) (Photo credit: justgrimes under this Creative Commons License)

 

High-quality data management is fundamental to research excellence. The ability to store, access, reuse and build upon digital data is critical to the advancement of research, supports innovative solutions to economic and social challenges, and holds tremendous potential for improvements in quality of life nationally and internationally.

 

As a step in this process, the agencies have developed the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management (the Statement). This builds on the 2013 consultation document, Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada, information provided by a Comprehensive Brief on Research Data Management Policies, and advice received through stakeholder engagement. The agencies sought feedback from the research community in summer 2015 on a draft version of the Statement.

 

The Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management outlines the agencies’ overarching expectations with regard to digital research data management, and the responsibilities of researchers, research communities, institutions and funders in meeting these expectations. It complements and builds upon existing agency policies, and will serve as a guide to assist the research community in preparing for, and contributing to the development of, Tri-Agency data management requirements. The HTML version is accessible here, and the PDF version is accessible here.

 

Read the full press release here

 

See The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy: How the UBC Library Can Help guide for UBC researchers

 

 

8016172703_918813b448_z

Open data (scrabble) (Photo credit: justgrimes under this Creative Commons License)

 

High-quality data management is fundamental to research excellence. The ability to store, access, reuse and build upon digital data is critical to the advancement of research, supports innovative solutions to economic and social challenges, and holds tremendous potential for improvements in quality of life nationally and internationally.

 

As a step in this process, the agencies have developed the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management (the Statement). This builds on the 2013 consultation document, Toward a Policy Framework for Advancing Digital Scholarship in Canada, information provided by a Comprehensive Brief on Research Data Management Policies, and advice received through stakeholder engagement. The agencies sought feedback from the research community in summer 2015 on a draft version of the Statement.

 

The Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management outlines the agencies’ overarching expectations with regard to digital research data management, and the responsibilities of researchers, research communities, institutions and funders in meeting these expectations. It complements and builds upon existing agency policies, and will serve as a guide to assist the research community in preparing for, and contributing to the development of, Tri-Agency data management requirements. The HTML version is accessible here, and the PDF version is accessible here.

 

Read the full press release here

 

See The Tri-Agency Open Access Policy: How the UBC Library Can Help guide for UBC researchers

 

 

Open-Textbooks-StickerSince 2012, the B.C. Open Textbook Project by BCcampus has created over 150 open textbooks “for the top 40 highest-enrolled subject areas in the province”. Its goal is “to make higher education more accessible by reducing student cost through the use of openly licensed textbooks”.

To date, this BCcampus project has racked up some impressive numbers not just in terms of statistics but also in student savings. For example, this project has 151 open textbooks in its collection which include 55 trades’ specific textbooks and 96 Top 40 textbooks in BC. So, how many students are using open textbooks? Exactly 14,484 so far. And how much in student savings? According to BCcampus, they measure between $1,450,300.00 – $1,839,126.00.

But what about licensing? The BCcampus open textbooks “are openly licensed using a Creative Commons license, and are offered in various e-book formats free of charge, or print on demand books available at cost”.

Read the full BCcampus news update here. And, just in case you missed it, check out our earlier blog post about one recent B.C. Open Textbook by Dr. Tony Bates. View/download it now

Above image and excerpt in italics is courtesy of BCcampus

Open-Textbooks-StickerSince 2012, the B.C. Open Textbook Project by BCcampus has created over 150 open textbooks “for the top 40 highest-enrolled subject areas in the province”. Its goal is “to make higher education more accessible by reducing student cost through the use of openly licensed textbooks”.

To date, this BCcampus project has racked up some impressive numbers not just in terms of statistics but also in student savings. For example, this project has 151 open textbooks in its collection which include 55 trades’ specific textbooks and 96 Top 40 textbooks in BC. So, how many students are using open textbooks? Exactly 14,484 so far. And how much in student savings? According to BCcampus, they measure between $1,450,300.00 – $1,839,126.00.

But what about licensing? The BCcampus open textbooks “are openly licensed using a Creative Commons license, and are offered in various e-book formats free of charge, or print on demand books available at cost”.

Read the full BCcampus news update here. And, just in case you missed it, check out our earlier blog post about one recent B.C. Open Textbook by Dr. Tony Bates. View/download it now

Above image and excerpt in italics is courtesy of BCcampus

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