From “The Wise Princess” (PZ7.D3775 Ne)

I hope everyone is taking care and staying well as we welcome April! Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

So far we have nine assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time over the coming weeks. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

“Little Poems for Little People” (PZ6 1850z B872)

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part III:

 

UBC Library users now have access to more than 5,000 books that offer historical perspectives on sex, sexuality and gender through Part III of Gale’s ‘Archives of Sexuality and Gender’. Complementing the recently-acquired LGBTQ History and culture since 1940, the digital archive contains nearly one million pages of unique and rare content that was previously banned and provides a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and how they evolved over centuries.

Part III of the archive includes three unique collections:

The British Library’s Private Case Collection comprised of printed books that were originally held separately from the Library’s main reference collection from the 1850s to 1990 on grounds of obscenity.      

The Kinsey Institute for Sex Research Collection – Special Subjects Units from Sex Research: Early Literature from Statistics to Erotica:  This collection is a portion of Dr. Alfred C. Kinsey’s original library, which he used to study human sexual behavior from multiple perspectives.   

New York Academy of Medicine Collection: A collection of rare and unique books covering a variety of subjects from sex education to erotica, manners to medicine.

The material in the archive covers a wide array of fields, providing multiple perspectives in research areas such as medicine, biology, anthropology, law, the classics, art and erotic literature.

New opportunities for teaching and research

Dr. Joy Dixon, Associate Professor and Associate Head of UBC’s Department of History is thrilled about what access to this collection means for her research. “My own work on the history of religion and sexuality in late 19C and early 20C Britain is given an enormous boost by access to the Private Case materials in this collection – there are a whole series of rare pamphlets in there that aren’t accessible anywhere else. Chapman Cohen’s 1909 Sex and Religion: studies in the pathology of religious development is one of the texts I am really looking forward to working my way through.”

She’s also excited by what access to the collection means for UBC students: “The collection offers incredible resources for students, and allow us to see how the understanding of sexuality has changed over time. There are materials in all the collections that would make a wonderful basis for an honours thesis or a primary source analysis/research paper.” 

Keith Bunnell, Reference and Collections Librarian, Humanities & Social Sciences Division echoes this excitement, “Because this resource is now offered by UBC, Simon Fraser University and the University of Victoria means that is it now opened up to all British Columbians,” says Bunnell “Everyone in BC can access this material regardless of academic affiliation.”

Explore Archives of Sexuality & Gender, Part III.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

From “In Powder and Crinoline” (PZ7.3.A1 Q85 In 1913)

I hope you are all staying safe and well! Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “The Little Witch of the Plain” (PZ6 1897 .S537)

So far we have nine assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time over the coming weeks. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part II:

 

Why are online formats important for library users? How does the library identify the needs of our users and acquire e-resources to meet them?

UBC Library has a collection of over 8 million e-resources that are available to the UBC community. Whether you’re on your phone or on your desktop, on campus or out doing field work, the Library ensures that e-resources are available.

Take a sneak peek into our process and learn about why UBC Library’s e-resources collection is increasing and how electronic resources work is constantly changing.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

To learn more about our Strategic Framework, click here.

From “The Exceptional Tadpole” (PZ6 1897 .S537)

I hope you are all staying healthy and well today! While the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is closed, we will unfortunately not be able to host some of the classes that we had scheduled to visit in the last few weeks of the winter 2020 term. We love hosting classes, as it allows us to introduce that many more students to our amazing collections. And it’s wonderful to see the interesting materials, some of which are new even to us, that professors select for the classes. But we especially love to see the results of the students’ work with our collections and the incredible insights they bring to their topics. Since we’re not open physically, we’re very happy to share some of this great student work with you virtually!

One of the assignments for Professor Pamela Dalziel’s winter 2020 course, “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image,” was a delightful project asking students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “The Old Woman who Lost her Dumpling” (PZ6 1898 H427)

So far we have seven assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time throughout the week. We hope you enjoy them and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of these books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part I:

 

 

CHINESE

CD2031 W829 2019
從存史到資政 : 民國以來檔案管理政策與制度變革(1912-1987) / 吳宇凡著

DS764.23 C44 Z4 2019
张謇与辛亥革命 / 张謇研究中心编

DS796.S25 C486 2019
上海张爱玲文学地图 / 淳子[and others]

DS881.83 H66 2019 v.1-2
戊辰戰爭 : 還原被隱藏的真相 = 戊辰戦争 : 隠された真実を暴 / 洪維揚著

GR705 S4 2019
生肖鼠 / 张立章 (中国生肖文化解读系列)

GT2853 C6 L58 2019
大宋饕客 : 從早市小攤吃到深夜食堂 / 劉海永著

HQ1147 C6 W36 2019
唐代宮女生活研究 / 万军杰著

PL2277 H448 2019
若無相見, 怎會相欠 : 民國大師的愛情 : 縱橫江湖的他們, 最後卻愛成了凡夫俗子 / 何滟著

PL2946 L515 S48 2019
水浒群星闪耀时 / 李黎著


JAPANESE

BQ8312.7 O86 2019
日蓮主義とはなんだったのか : 近代日本の思想水脈 / 大谷栄一

DS881.9 K67 2019
公正から問う近代日本史 / 編著佐藤健太郎, 荻山正浩, 山口道弘 ; 青木健 [and 7 others]

DS894.99 O374 U24 2019
ヤンキーと地元 : 解体屋、風俗経営者、ヤミ業者になった沖縄の若者たち / 打越正行

HC462.95 N36 2019
日本が外資に喰われる / 中尾茂夫.

NE1321.8 P36 2019
パノラマ浮世絵「幕末・明治の東京・横浜風景」

PL673.5 S27 2019
近世節用集史の研究 / 佐藤貴裕著.

PL874 S56 U98 2019
渦 : 妹背山婦女庭訓魂結び / 大島真寿美[著]

PN1995.9 D6 S28 2019
中国ドキュメンタリー映画論 / 佐藤賢

Z115.5 J3 K63 2019
誤読例に学ぶくずし字 : 古文書解読検定総復習 / 小林正博


KOREAN

B127 C65 C52895 2018
유학 의 개척자들 / 최 대우, 이 향준, 조 우진, 정 영수 공저

DS917.35 K56825 2019
한국 현대사 와 국가 폭력 / 김 상숙 [and five others] 엮음

GT4883 A2 L47 2018
한중 세시 명절 풍속사 와 문화 정책 비교 연구 = 韓中歲時名節風俗史與文化政策比較硏究 / 이 진

HN730.5 A8 C4668 2019
전환기 의 한국 사회 : 성장 과 정체성 의 정치 를 넘어 / 맑스 코뮤날레 지음

NK2673.6 A1 C469 2019
한국 가구 의 역사 : 선사 시대 부터 일제 강점기 까지 / 조 숙경 지음

PL907.5 C6 H38 2018
한국어 문학 및 지역어 연구 의 한중 학술 교류 와 성과 / 전남 대학교 BK21+ 지역어 기반 문화 가치 창출 인재 양성 사업단

PL918 C45 2018
과학 으로 풀어낸 흥미 로운 한글 이야기 : 한글 넘어 생각 넘어 / 진 대영 지음

PN6790 K64 K36 2019 v.1
카카오 프렌즈 러브 / 글 오쭈 ; 그림 흑부

QA76.9 D343 S564 2019
나 는 감 이 아니라 데이터 로 말 한다 : 팩트 의 홍수 에서 진실 을 골라 내는 데이터 읽기 의 기술 / 신 현호 지음

Did you know that UBC Library has thousands of full online copies of their most popular books? At Xwi7xwa, we have some of the most popular/circulating materials available online for students & faculty to access, as well as streaming videos through McIntyre Media.

If you need help finding resources or alternative resources to a print materials you can’t access right now, please email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca and a librarian will email you back with some options!

How to Find Online Materials through the catalog:

Option 1:

Through this link to the UBC Library catalogue, you can search specifically for materials that are available online. The image below is where the link will take you.

Under the “Filter by Date/Location/Format/Language,” select “Location: Online” to view items that will be available in their full format online. You can type in a specific title, keywords, authors, or subjects and see what comes up.

Option 2:

A way to view if a specific material that the Library owns in print is also available online by clicking on the title in the item record.

In the above example, you can see the title is printed twice. Click on the second title listed; this one is a clickable link.

Clicking on the title will lead you to a page much like the one above. There are three types of records: a record of the book at Xwi7xwa, at other UBC library locations, and the copy available online. Click on the option that says “Status, Library Location: ONLINE”

Either option will lead you to a page like the example in the below image:

Once here, select the orange “Online Access” button on the right side of the screen. This will take you to the online ebook.

Helpful Hints for Keyword Searches through Summon

  • Use quotation marks to search for a phrase.
    • Example: “First Nations”
  • Use a question mark to truncate a term to search for words with the same stem.
    • Example: Aborig? retrieves Aboriginal, Aboriginals, Aborigine, etc.
  • Use “AND” in searches will allow you to limit your results even farther.
    • example: “first nations” AND “residential schools” will only show you results with both those phrases in them. This works for more than just two as well
  • Use “OR” to find phrases that could be interchangeable to make the search wider
    • example: “first nations” OR “indigenous” OR “aboriginal”
  • Combine “AND” and “OR”
    • example: “first nations” OR “indigenous” OR “aboriginal” AND “residential schools”

How to Find Streaming Videos:

Option 1:

UBC Library uses a platform called McIntyre Media to stream videos we’ve subscribed to.

  1. Search the phrase “Mcintyre media” in simple search and filter the results to Online OR click this link.
  2. Select any of the titles on the list to see their record.
  3. Under Actions on the right hand side click Online to gain access to 165 titles

Check out this post from Xwi7xwa last year for some video recommendations.

Option 2:

Head onto the simple search of the catalogue and the page below will pop up

Under “Filter by Date/Location/Format/Language,”select “Location: ONLINE'” and put in your search term(s).

Once you are taken to your search results, you will want to add an additional filter from the left side column.

Add the filter “Format: Videorecording” to be able to view online videos. Some of these will be from McIntyre Media, but some will not. It depends on what search terms were used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option 3: 

UBC Library has a research guide all about online film and media that you can access.

Looking for non-academic films to take your mind off your coursework? Check out this database UBC has access to until April 20th!

Featured Online Books & Resources:

As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance by Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (also available online) gives the reader many of the ways that Indigenous resistance has stopped natural resource extraction. From tar sands to pipelines, Indigenous resistance has pushed against colonization and the dispossession of land. This book not only examines the relationship between Indigenous peoples and natural resources, but ways to push back against settler-colonialism as a whole.

Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples by Linda Tuhiwai Smith explores the ways in which imperils is embedded in the disciplines of knowledge, and argues that the decolonization of research methods will help reclaim control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

First Wives Club: Coast Salish Style by Lee Maracle is a collection of short stories provides revealing glimpses into the life experiences of an Aboriginal woman, a university professor, an activist and a single mother in the lower mainland of B.C.

Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask by Anton Treuer uses matter-of-fact responses to over 120 questions, both thoughtful and outrageous, modern and historical, Ojibwe scholar and cultural preservationist Anton Treuer gives a frank, funny, and sometimes personal tour of “what’s up with Indians, anyway?”

C̓äsna7äm, The City Before The City directed and produced by Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (also available online) looks at the story of the land UBC and Vancouver sits on before it became Vancouver and UBC. This documentary specifically looks at the 200 day vigil the Musqueam people to halt a condo development that unearthed ancestral remains.

Need more help finding resources? Email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca!

Did you know we have a great graphic novel section at the library? Located on top of our vertical files, right next to our french language collection! Being able to see words and images on the page at the same time allows graphic novels to communicate emotions to readers that words alone might not. Here are some of our librarians’ picks from the collection and hopefully we’ll see you when you come pick one up!

The Night Wanderer by Drew Hayden Taylor ; art by Michael Wyatt; graphic adaptation by Alison Kooistra

When 16-year-old Tiffany discovers her father is renting out her room, she’s deeply upset. Sure, their guest is polite and keeps to himself, but he’s also a little creepy. No one expects that the mysterious Pierre L’Errant is actually a vampire, returning to his home after centuries spent away.

Louis Riel: A Comic Strip Biography by Chester Brown

Follow the charismatic, and perhaps mad, nineteenth-century Metis leader whose struggle to win rights for his people led to violent rebellion on the nations western frontier.

Three Feathers by Richard Van Camp & K. Mateus

Three young men have vandalized their community and are sent by its Elders to live nine months on the land as part of their sentencing. Through their time, the young men learn to take responsibility for their actions and find the humility needed to return home.

Turn On A Light: a Bedtime Story for Grown Ups by Shane L. Koyczan; illustrated by Sly Aida

This novel illustrates the connection between grandsons, fathers, and grandfathers and the roles they play to protect one another.

The 500 Years of Resistance Comic Book by Gord Hill

A historically accurate portrayal of Indigenous resistance to the European colonization in the Americas, beginning with Christopher Columbus and ending with the Six Nations land reclamation in Ontario in 2006.

Silence Is A Song I Know All the Words To by Shane Koyczan and Gareth Gaudin; with colours by Jim Smith

A collection of poems in graphic novel format that examines love of yourself along with other themes. Koyczan has an spoken word poetry album of the same name to read along with the graphic novel, but unfortunately, we don’t own it at the library.

Will I See? by Iskwé and Erin Leslie; script by David Alexander Robertson; art by GMB Chomichuk

Based on the story by Iskwé and Erin Leslie, this graphic novel is a story of tragedy and beauty that illuminates the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women in a format more reachable than academic texts.

Colonial Comics edited by Jason Rodriguez, A. David Lewis, and J. L. Bell

A collection of 20 short stories focusing rarely told historical stories during the colonial period of New England.

The Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection, one of our most well-known and beloved special collections, contains material related to three broad and interrelated themes: early British Columbia history, immigration and settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The collection contains a wide variety of documents, photographs, books, artifacts and maps related to each of these themes.

Selections from the collection are on display in RBSC, organized to show some of the most compelling stories of Canada’s past.

Early B.C. history:

Related to early B.C. history are rare editions of the narratives of many Pacific voyages of discovery including Valdes, Galiano, Malaspina, Cook and Vancouver. The exhibition also features charts recording the exploration of the Pacific Northwest.

Immigration and settlement:

The Fraser River gold rush that sparked Chinese immigration to British Columbia is highlighted through books and government documents relating to the restriction of such immigration. Chinese-Canadian cultural, social and economic life is displayed through archival documents, photographs and artifacts.

European immigration to Canada is illustrated with promotional brochures and posters encouraging settlers to the West, and archival material from the Clandonald colony in Alberta, a community of immigrants from the Scottish Hebrides.

Canadian Pacific Railway:

Documents, maps and publications show how the Canadian Pacific Railway was built, and how Vancouver was chosen as the western terminus. Photographs and accounts of the building of the railway are presented, along with vibrant posters promoting travel and tourism via C.P.R. rail and steamships. Beautiful examples of cruise ship memorabilia provide a glimpse of the style of the times.

RBSC offers a drop-in tour of the Chung Collection room every Thursday at 10 a.m. The exhibition is also open to the public, free of charge during Rare Books and Special Collections opening hours (Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.). We hope to welcome you for a visit soon!

 

March 8th is International Women’s Day across the globe! It is to celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of all women, past, present, & future. It is also used as a day to signify a call to action for accelerating women’s equality in society.

The theme for this year is Each for Equal, explained as:

An equal world is an enabled world.

Individually, we’re all responsible for our own thoughts and actions – all day, every day.

We can actively choose to challenge stereotypes, fight bias, broaden perceptions, improve situations and celebrate women’s achievements.

Collectively, each one of us can help create a gender equal world.

Let’s all be #EachforEqual.

(International Women’s Day Theme, 2020)

You might see some social media activity with the hashtags #IWD2020 and #EachforEqual, which are the official hashtags by the International Women’s Day organization.

Here at Xwi7xwa, we’ve picked out some of our favourite books surrounding women, feminism, and womanhood.

A Recognition of Being: Reconstructing Native Womanhood by Kim Anderson explores how Indigenous womanhood had been constructed and reconstructed in Canada, and examines how important the ability to self-determine yourself is in a colonial society.

Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canada’s Colonial Past edited by Katie Pickles and Myra Rutherdale places women as both colonizer and colonized (sometimes even simultaneously), to demonstrate that women were uniquely positioned at the axis of the colonial encounter. Contact Zones puts Canadian women’s history within colonial and imperial systems.

Keetsahnak: Our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Sisters edited by Kim Anderson, Maria Campbell & Christi Belcourt the tension between personal, political, and public action is brought home starkly as the contributors look at the roots of violence and how it diminishes life for all.

This Wound is a World: poems by Billy-Ray Belcourt issues a call to turn to love and sex to understand how Indigenous peoples shoulder sadness and pain like theirs without giving up on the future.

“Until Our Hearts Are On the Ground”: Aboriginal Mothering, Oppression, Resistance and Rebirth edited by D. Memee Lavell-Harvard and Jeannette Corbiere Lavell is a collection of multiple voices demonstrating the issues surrounding Indigenous motherhood in contemporary society and the effects it has on mothering practices, government policies, and the way mothers are represented in the media.

Empire of Wild by Cherie Dimaline follows Joan through a propulsive, stunning and sensuous novel inspired by the traditional Métis story of the Rogarou – a werewolf-like creature that haunts the roads and woods of Métis communities.

When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty by Mark Rifkin examines the relationships between colonialism through U.S government policy & history and Indigenous peoples sexuality/sexual order of society.

Making Space for Indigenous Feminism edited by Joyce Green covers a wide range of some of the most important issues facing Indigenous peoples today: violence against women, recovery of Indigenous self-determination, racism, misogyny and decolonization in a global context.

Living on the Land: Indigenous Women’s Understanding of Place edited by Nathalie Kermoal and Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez looks at how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism shape the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowledge holders and knowledge producers. Different writers explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women’s knowledge, how knowledge is rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and how knowledge is not inseparable from land and landscape.

Life Stages and Native Women: Memory, Teachings, and Story Medicine by Kim Anderson shares the teachings of fourteen elders from the Canadian prairies and Ontario to illustrate how different life stages were experienced by Métis, Cree, and Anishinaabe girls and women during the mid-twentieth century.

Hope Matters by Lee Maracle, Columpa Bobb, & Tania Carter is a collection of poetry written together as mothers & daughters that focuses on Indigenous history from colonial beginnings to reconciliation.

 

Looking for something else to read on International Women’s Day? Stop in to catch with our librarians or email us at xwi7xwa.library@ubc.ca!

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet