Since 2013, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre has been a funding partner with the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) and the Network of Inquiry and Innovation (NOII). Through this partnership, the Learning Centre has supported teachers working with aboriginal students transitioning to further education. Read more about it here.

The 2017/18 Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) call for community submissions is now open.

The deadline is Friday, June 16, 2017.

Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) is a collaborative approach to building on the capacities of rural, remote and Northern British Columbian communities. LIRN BC is listed as a project of the BC Rural Network, established in 2004.

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is proud to partner through LIRN BC with government and non-government organizations to provide and facilitate workshops to promote community learning and collaboration in rural and northern communities.

LIRN BC can bring trainers and facilitators to your community to deliver a learning event for residents.

The annual call for “Expressions of Interest” (EOI) occurs May and June each year.  It includes summaries for roughly 25 workshops offered by LIRN BC partner organizations (including an option to “build your own topic”).

In responding to the call for EOIs, applicants are asked to tell us about your community and its challenges, and identify up to three workshop topics that will help your community move forward. If your agency is selected, you will be contacted by a LIRN BC partner who will work with you to design and deliver a learning event that meets the needs of your community. Successful applicants would be expected to provide publicity support, venue and refreshments.

Click here to download the Expressions of Interest document.

The current LIRN BC partners are:

  • Association of Neighbourhood Houses BC (ANHBC)
  • BC Centre for Employment Excellence
  • BC Healthy Communities (PlanH Program)
  • UBC Library, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
  • Leave Out Violence (LOVE) Society of BC
  • PeerNetBC
  • SPARC BC
  • Vantage Point
  • Volunteer BC
  • YouthCo

For further information please contact jsands@sparc.bc.ca.

 

Date: May 1 – 31, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

This exhibition honours the special significance that written forms hold across the many unique cultures of Asia – a vast geographical area boasting an enormous diversity of languages and writing systems.

Each case features rare texts and diverse forms of bookmaking that highlight the prominent role of writing and calligraphy found across Asia. Encompassing Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Farsi, Tibetan, Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Gujarati scripts, the works invite you to explore a range of cultural or sacred practices that find expression in the written word. These works provide a glimpse of the ingenious ways in which Asian writers have blurred the boundaries between the textual and the visual realms, creatively deploying script to communicate deeper layers of meaning that go beyond words themselves. All of the extraordinary texts on display belong to the collections of the UBC’s Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections.

This satellite exhibit is co-curated by April Liu (Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, Asia, MOA) and Fuyubi Nakamura (MOA Curator, Asia), in collaboration with the UBC’s Asian Library and UBC Rare Books and Special Collections. It is held in conjunction with Traces of Words: Art and Calligraphy from Asia, a larger exhibit on view at the Museum of Anthropology, from May 11 to October 9, 2017.

 

 

 

The Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL) is excited to host Professor Dragan Gasevic, Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics from University of Edinburgh, to talk about State and Directions of Learning Analytics Adoption.  The analysis of data collected from user interactions with educational and information technology has attracted much attention as a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the learning process.  This promise motivated the emergence of the new field of learning analytics and mobilized the education sector to embrace the use of data for decision-making. This talk will first introduce the field of learning analytics and touch on lessons learned from well-known case studies. The talk will then identify critical challenges that require immediate attention in order for learning analytics to make a sustainable impact on learning, teaching, and decision making. The talk will conclude by discussing a set of milestones selected as critical for the maturation of the field of learning analytics.

The most important take away from the talk will be that:

  • systemic approaches to the development and adoption of learning analytics are critical,
  • multidisciplinary teams are necessary to unlock a full potential of learning analytics, and
  • capacity development at institutional levels through the inclusion of diverse stakeholders is essential for full learning analytics adoption.

 


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Where: Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Speaker Biography

Dragan Gasevic is a Professor and the Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics in the Moray House School of Education and the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. As the President (2015-2017) and a co-founder of the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR), he has had the pleasure to serve as a founding program co-chair of the International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK) in 2011 and 2012, general chair of LAK in 16, founding program co-chair of the Learning Analytics Summer Institute (LASI) in 2013 and 2014, and a founding editor of the Journal of Learning Analytics. Computer scientist by formal education, Dragan considers himself a learning analyst whose research centers on learning analytics, self-regulated and social learning, higher education policy, and data mining. The award-winning work of his team on the LOCO-Analytics software is considered one of the pioneering contributions in the growing area of learning analytics. Recently, he has founded ProSolo Technologies Inc. that developed a software solution for tracking, evaluating, and recognizing competencies gained through self-directed learning and social interactions. He is a frequent keynote speaker and a (co-)author of numerous research papers and books.

Please join us for an exploration of cultural humility and what it means for how we teach and learn. We will hear from Dr. Evan Adams, Chief Medical Officer of the First Nations Health Authority and a trailblazer in promoting cultural humility within the healthcare system.

With humour and wisdom, Dr. Adams offers insights into the journey of cultural humility and how this ongoing process of learning and reflecting can strengthen relationships and improve outcomes.

Participants are welcomed and encouraged to engage in this interactive session to advance the dialogue on cultural humility and learn from one another’s journeys.

Learning Objectives
1.       Explore the meaning of cultural safety and cultural humility.
2.       Reflect on the role of cultural humility in your work – how can cultural humility enhance experiences in the classroom?

If you are unable to attend this session in person and want to join us via webinar please register here: http://learningcircle.ubc.ca/about/session-registration-form/webinar-registration-on-territory-acknowledgements/

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)


Speaker Biography

Dr. Evan Adams is a citizen of Tla’amin (Sliammon) First Nation in Powell River, BC, and Chief Medical Officer at the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), the first health authority of its kind in Canada. In this role, Dr. Adams acts as the “face” of the FNHA’s public health function and serves as its representative / keynote speaker at health conferences and community events. He also develops and/or strengthens partnerships with First Nations health governance partners, BC First Nations, provincial and federal government health agencies, and other FNHA departments, to establish relationships and action plans. Before joining the FNHA, Dr. Adams served as Deputy Provincial Health Officer (BC), where he provided direction on First Nations health issues to the Ministry of Health, reported to First Nations citizens on health issues affecting the general population, and set out a path for the improvement of First Nations health and wellness. He completed an MD at the University of Calgary, an Aboriginal Family Practice residency at St Paul’s Hospital/UBC (as Chief Resident), and a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Nadya Kwandibens)

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

Cst. Graham Walker

In 2015, Constable Graham Walker of the Metro Vancouver Transit Police was asked to research the force’s history for their 10-year anniversary. His research led him to the City of Vancouver Archives, BC Hydro Archives, the Vancouver Police Museum and to our very own UBC Library’s Rare Books & Special Collections where he discovered that the history of the Vancouver Transit Police in fact dates back more than 100 years – to 1904. In his digging, Walker uncovered something even more intriguing, the 102-year-old unsolved murder of Charles Painter, a special constable for the BC Electric Railway, in 1915.  We spoke to Constable Walker about his incredible journey into the past and the research that has culminated in a provincial memorial for Charles Painter.

How did you first learn about Charles Painter’s murder?

I was part of the event planning team for Transit Police’s 10-year anniversary in December 2015, and I was curious about our origins previous to the BC Transit Special Constables who were first appointed in 1985. My research began at BC Hydro Library and Archives, then UBC Library’s Rare Books & Special Collections. Before long I had learned of a century-long history of railway constables, night watchmen, and security officers on transit in British Columbia. There was even an armed special constabulary which protected the transit and power systems during World War II. Continuing my research, I visited the Vancouver Police Museum. There, the curator was assisting me in reviewing their archives when she discovered Painter’s murder recorded in the Vancouver Police annual report from 1915.

What made you want to learn more about his death?

This was the first anyone had heard of a line-of-duty death in our organization’s history. I also knew that he was not listed on the provincial memorial for fallen officers. Recognizing him was important to me because I felt a personal connection – he did a similar job to mine and I was even the same age as him when he died. It was an especially tragic death because it was caused by another person, and not an accident. He never had a memorial, and wasn’t recognized – possibly because he had no known family at the time of his death. This was a wrong I knew I could correct by collecting the appropriate evidence for a proposal that he be added to the memorial. 

Tell us a little about Charles Painter, his job and how he died.

Back in 1915, the streetcar system was operated by BC Electric Railway, a company which also operated power plants and sold electricity to cities and residents – that company became BC Hydro in 1962. They employed constables, appointed under the Railway Act, for special projects or events. In S/Cst. Painter’s case, during World War I he was assigned to the tracks along False Creek to guard against wire theft. It was 2 am on March 19th, 1915 when he spotted a man carrying a sack on his back near to the tracks. He called out to him and drew his revolver. In the resulting struggle, the gun went off and the suspect fled west along the tracks with Painter’s gun, handcuffs, and baton. He was taken to Vancouver General Hospital via the Police Ambulance, but succumbed to his injuries two days later.

I focused on three things that were required for him to be honoured by the provincial memorial – that he was duly appointed to office, he was acting in good faith at the time of the incident, and his death was caused by an external influence. I first reached out to Vancouver PD to see if they had files on the investigation, but unfortunately, they didn’t. Local historians tell me that back then, detectives would routinely take files and exhibits home after the case was concluded. The provincial archives did have the coroner’s inquest on file, which was of great help. It included witness testimony from the man who found Painter wandering West 6th Avenue calling for help, and how he got him to the hospital. With the inquest file, the UBC Library Rare Books Special Collections records showing how constables were appointed, and copies of the Railway Act of 1911, I was able to put together a proposal. It included an endorsement from Chief LePard and an explanation of how Metro Vancouver Transit Police is a succeeding agency. It was accepted and his name was added to the memorial.

Senior Library Assistant, Felicie de la Parra and Vivian Yan, Public Service Library Assistant work through the BC Electric fonds with Cst. Walker.

Tell us about the sources that you found most helpful at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections that helped you with your search.

I had to refer to the BC Electric fonds. While Painter’s death was one of the most important things I discovered, much what we know about transit policing in BC resides in the RBSC collection.Early records include letters of appointment for constables, lists of locations where they were deployed, and even reports on their activities. Later files include newspaper clippings of transit related crime including robberies and thefts. The most interesting files are from the years 1904 to 1918 and include the names of many of the people who were early protectors of the streetcar and transit system. My favourite item is one describing how a constable was suspected of taking a drink while on duty while posted to the terminal at 425 Carrall Street in 1909. The railway hired a private detective agency to pose as streetcar employees to monitor his activities. Their observations make for an interesting peek into the goings on at Hastings and Carrall during that time period. The constable was followed into the nearby hotel bars and was fired as a result. 

One of several reports Cst. Graham referred to in his research.

Who did you work with at Rare Books and Special Collections and can you tell us a little about how you worked together?

It was by recommendation from the librarian at BC Hydro that I first reached out to RBSC. Through the UBC website I reached librarian Chelsea Shriver, who invited me to attend in person. I had never conducted archival research, so she had to show me the ropes – and was very helpful. I started by asking for a few boxes listed in the BC Electric collection. The library staff walked me through requesting material, and protocols around reproducing information and how to reference my sources. Even when I had questions about the origins of material or was looking for more, they knew right where to look. I’ve returned several times in the hopes of finding more, and I’m lured there still by the chance there are more amazing stories remaining hidden in those boxes.

Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born and raised in the lower mainland to parents (and grandparents) who worked in the justice system. I was an officer with Correctional Service Canada before joining Transit Police, and I have specialized in public relations/communications in policing. A graduate of Thompson Rivers University, I have always had an interest in local history. This project has really piqued my interest though, as it combines my career with my hobby. It was really a pleasure to learn about things which were long forgotten.

What’s next? Any new developments in the Charles Painter story?

Well, S/Cst. Painter’s murder is still technically unsolved. While there was some evidence which surfaced in Steveston in late 1916, the prime suspect was never brought to trial and I’m still searching for a young soldier’s letter which implicated a man with pro-German sentiments as responsible for the murder. In the meantime, our employees have purchased Painter a gravestone which will be dedicated and consecrated at a ceremony on the 102nd anniversary of his death in March.

Cst. Graham Walker at the Provincial Memorial for fallen officers where Cst. Charles Painter’s name has been added.

A private gravestone dedication for Charles Painter will take place on March 21, 2017.

 

Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Computer Science

Information Visualization

 

This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

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