Now in its fifteenth consecutive year at UBC, the Food For Fines campaign waives $2 in Library fines for every food item donated, to a maximum of $30. The program began as a joint initiative to support disadvantaged members of the community, and has become an integral source of the AMS Food Bank’s food reserves to support UBC students in need.

Non-perishable food items were collected at circulation desks and then distributed to the AMS Food Bank.

Thank you to everyone who participated in this year’s campaign!

Please note members of the community are welcome to donate goods year-round at the AMS Food Bank and Greater Vancouver Food Bank. For more information visit the AMS Food Bank website.


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing.

People with mental illness and substance use challenges are among the most stigmatized population in the world. The field of neuroscience is making strides to redress this by changing the etiological paradigm from a pejorative behavior model to one that is brain based. Evidence from neuroscience serves as a powerful agent for challenging problematic beliefs and attitudes held by healthcare providers and society. Translating this evidence to current and future healthcare providers, to patients and the public, will contribute to breaking down barriers that prevent persons experiencing these challenges from seeking and utilizing treatment.

Bio: Deborah Finnell has specialized in mental health and addictions for most her nursing career. From her grounding as a registered nurse working in inpatient psychiatry, she expanded her role to that of a clinical nurse specialist and then a nurse practitioner. She brings her passion for the neurobiological bases of mental illness and substance use to her clinical practice, teaching, research, and policy/advocacy work. With funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dr. Finnell led the integration of substance-use related content including screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) into the nursing curricula at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She advocates for expanded access to mental illness and substance use treatment, such as calling for advanced practice nurses to prescribe buprenorphine. During her tenure with the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Hospital Administration, she conducted funded research focusing on improving the health of Veterans with mental and substance use disorders. Her professional leadership roles range from past chair of the New York State Peer Assistance Committee to past president of the International Nurses Society on Addictions. She served as chair of the Addictions Nursing Certification Board and was a member of the Committee on Nursing Standards for the American Nurses Association. She currently serves on the board of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) and is associate editor of that organization’s professional journal, Substance Abuse.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Carey, M. G., Al-Zaiti, S. S., Dean, G. E., Sessanna, L., & Finnell, D. S. (2011). Sleep problems, depression, substance use, social bonding, and quality of life in professional firefighters. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(8), 928-933. [Link]

Crickman, R., & Finnell, D. (2016;2015;). Systematic review of control measures to reduce hazardous drug exposure for health care workers. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 31(2), 183-190. [Link]

Sanchez, M., & Finnell, D. (2017). Alcohol screening and brief intervention for persons living with HIV. Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in Aids Care, 28(2), 266-278. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC iSchool.

Abstract: In this talk, I seek to understand what we mean by information access, and what it means to provide information access in a responsible way. Specifically, I examine the idea of facts. How should providers of information deal with facts? To examine this question, I consider the 2017 protest slogan “Librarians for Facts.” What does this slogan really mean? Ultimately, I suggest that information providers need to determine what they are for, and orient information access mechanisms toward that goal.

Bio: Melanie Feinberg is an Associate Professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a classificationist whose research approach combines design with the humanities. Her work focuses on learning how to read and write databases to complement our engineering and mining of them. She received her PhD in 2008 from the iSchool at the University of Washington; she has a master’s from the iSchool at Berkeley (2004) and was an undergraduate at Stanford (1992). In her professional career before returning to academia, she was a content strategist and technical editor, working at companies such as Apple Computer, Scient, and PeopleSoft.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Feinberg, M. (2017). Reading databases: Slow information interactions beyond the retrieval paradigm. Journal of Documentation, 73(2), 336-356. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2017). The value of discernment: Making use of interpretive flexibility in metadata generation and aggregation. Information Research-an International Electronic Journal, 22(1), 1. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2011). How information systems communicate as documents: The concept of authorial voice. Journal of Documentation, 67(6), 1015-1037. [Link]

Since 2013, the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre has been a funding partner with the Aboriginal Enhancement Schools Network (AESN) and the Network of Inquiry and Innovation (NOII). Through this partnership, the Learning Centre has supported teachers working with aboriginal students transitioning to further education. Read more about it here.

The 2017/18 Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) call for community submissions is now open.

The deadline is Friday, June 16, 2017.

Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) is a collaborative approach to building on the capacities of rural, remote and Northern British Columbian communities. LIRN BC is listed as a project of the BC Rural Network, established in 2004.

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is proud to partner through LIRN BC with government and non-government organizations to provide and facilitate workshops to promote community learning and collaboration in rural and northern communities.

LIRN BC can bring trainers and facilitators to your community to deliver a learning event for residents.

The annual call for “Expressions of Interest” (EOI) occurs May and June each year.  It includes summaries for roughly 25 workshops offered by LIRN BC partner organizations (including an option to “build your own topic”).

In responding to the call for EOIs, applicants are asked to tell us about your community and its challenges, and identify up to three workshop topics that will help your community move forward. If your agency is selected, you will be contacted by a LIRN BC partner who will work with you to design and deliver a learning event that meets the needs of your community. Successful applicants would be expected to provide publicity support, venue and refreshments.

Click here to download the Expressions of Interest document.

The current LIRN BC partners are:

  • Association of Neighbourhood Houses BC (ANHBC)
  • BC Centre for Employment Excellence
  • BC Healthy Communities (PlanH Program)
  • UBC Library, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
  • Leave Out Violence (LOVE) Society of BC
  • PeerNetBC
  • SPARC BC
  • Vantage Point
  • Volunteer BC
  • YouthCo

For further information please contact jsands@sparc.bc.ca.

 

Date: May 1 – 31, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

This exhibition honours the special significance that written forms hold across the many unique cultures of Asia – a vast geographical area boasting an enormous diversity of languages and writing systems.

Each case features rare texts and diverse forms of bookmaking that highlight the prominent role of writing and calligraphy found across Asia. Encompassing Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Farsi, Tibetan, Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Gujarati scripts, the works invite you to explore a range of cultural or sacred practices that find expression in the written word. These works provide a glimpse of the ingenious ways in which Asian writers have blurred the boundaries between the textual and the visual realms, creatively deploying script to communicate deeper layers of meaning that go beyond words themselves. All of the extraordinary texts on display belong to the collections of the UBC’s Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections.

This satellite exhibit is co-curated by April Liu (Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow, Asia, MOA) and Fuyubi Nakamura (MOA Curator, Asia), in collaboration with the UBC’s Asian Library and UBC Rare Books and Special Collections. It is held in conjunction with Traces of Words: Art and Calligraphy from Asia, a larger exhibit on view at the Museum of Anthropology, from May 11 to October 9, 2017.

 

 

 

The Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL) is excited to host Professor Dragan Gasevic, Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics from University of Edinburgh, to talk about State and Directions of Learning Analytics Adoption.  The analysis of data collected from user interactions with educational and information technology has attracted much attention as a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the learning process.  This promise motivated the emergence of the new field of learning analytics and mobilized the education sector to embrace the use of data for decision-making. This talk will first introduce the field of learning analytics and touch on lessons learned from well-known case studies. The talk will then identify critical challenges that require immediate attention in order for learning analytics to make a sustainable impact on learning, teaching, and decision making. The talk will conclude by discussing a set of milestones selected as critical for the maturation of the field of learning analytics.

The most important take away from the talk will be that:

  • systemic approaches to the development and adoption of learning analytics are critical,
  • multidisciplinary teams are necessary to unlock a full potential of learning analytics, and
  • capacity development at institutional levels through the inclusion of diverse stakeholders is essential for full learning analytics adoption.

 


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Where: Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Speaker Biography

Dragan Gasevic is a Professor and the Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics in the Moray House School of Education and the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. As the President (2015-2017) and a co-founder of the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR), he has had the pleasure to serve as a founding program co-chair of the International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK) in 2011 and 2012, general chair of LAK in 16, founding program co-chair of the Learning Analytics Summer Institute (LASI) in 2013 and 2014, and a founding editor of the Journal of Learning Analytics. Computer scientist by formal education, Dragan considers himself a learning analyst whose research centers on learning analytics, self-regulated and social learning, higher education policy, and data mining. The award-winning work of his team on the LOCO-Analytics software is considered one of the pioneering contributions in the growing area of learning analytics. Recently, he has founded ProSolo Technologies Inc. that developed a software solution for tracking, evaluating, and recognizing competencies gained through self-directed learning and social interactions. He is a frequent keynote speaker and a (co-)author of numerous research papers and books.

Please join us for an exploration of cultural humility and what it means for how we teach and learn. We will hear from Dr. Evan Adams, Chief Medical Officer of the First Nations Health Authority and a trailblazer in promoting cultural humility within the healthcare system.

With humour and wisdom, Dr. Adams offers insights into the journey of cultural humility and how this ongoing process of learning and reflecting can strengthen relationships and improve outcomes.

Participants are welcomed and encouraged to engage in this interactive session to advance the dialogue on cultural humility and learn from one another’s journeys.

Learning Objectives
1.       Explore the meaning of cultural safety and cultural humility.
2.       Reflect on the role of cultural humility in your work – how can cultural humility enhance experiences in the classroom?

If you are unable to attend this session in person and want to join us via webinar please register here: http://learningcircle.ubc.ca/about/session-registration-form/webinar-registration-on-territory-acknowledgements/

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)


Speaker Biography

Dr. Evan Adams is a citizen of Tla’amin (Sliammon) First Nation in Powell River, BC, and Chief Medical Officer at the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), the first health authority of its kind in Canada. In this role, Dr. Adams acts as the “face” of the FNHA’s public health function and serves as its representative / keynote speaker at health conferences and community events. He also develops and/or strengthens partnerships with First Nations health governance partners, BC First Nations, provincial and federal government health agencies, and other FNHA departments, to establish relationships and action plans. Before joining the FNHA, Dr. Adams served as Deputy Provincial Health Officer (BC), where he provided direction on First Nations health issues to the Ministry of Health, reported to First Nations citizens on health issues affecting the general population, and set out a path for the improvement of First Nations health and wellness. He completed an MD at the University of Calgary, an Aboriginal Family Practice residency at St Paul’s Hospital/UBC (as Chief Resident), and a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Nadya Kwandibens)

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

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