Creativity in the Arts: The Role of Copyright

Date

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 – 1:00pm to 4:15pm

Location

British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT), Downtown Campus, Atrium Room, 8th floor (Room 825)

Full Details and Registration (please register by Feb. 18)

On Tuesday February 25, to mark Fair Dealing Week, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, VCC, and BCIT invite you to an afternoon of presentations and discussion exploring the impact of copyright and fair dealing on artists working in a variety of disciplines. Light refreshments will be served.

Keynote: Copyrights to the Rescue! (Or Not)

Brianne Selman, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Librarian at the University of Winnipeg and co-investigator on the Cultural Capital Project

Brianne will talk about this collaborative research project that explores the history of the increasing concentration and corporatization of the music industry and investigates a new model of remuneration. Brianne will describe this new model and the theoretical trajectories, legal ramifications, and technical components involved in creating a non-profit patronage system and social network that would directly connect musical artists and fans. Ideally the system would facilitate the payment of both artists and their fans for their creative efforts, while also crafting legal and theoretical arguments for a more open copyright regime.

Panel: Copyright and the Creative Arts

Following Brianne’s talk there will be a panel discussion moderated by Martha Rans, the Director of the Artists’ Legal Outreach. The panel brings together Vancouver-based artists working in a range of creative disciplines for a discussion of how and when artists have to consider copyright, how copyright intersects with the practice of artists, and what this entails. This is an area that is not often addressed in detail in post-secondaries, yet is a growing area of concern and interest for both students and copyright professionals in higher education.

Panelists:

Joanna Garfinkel, dramaturge at Universal Limited theatre company
Josue Menjivar, graphic novelist and illustrator, instructor at Langara College
Sean Penney, video game designer, CPO Pocket Pinata, Inc.
Evann Siebens, video and performance artist

Stephanie Savage Library employee profile

Stephanie Savage has spent the past two years developing her career and a new job portfolio as UBC Library’s Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services Librarian. “I was able to be creative in initiating projects, developing connections across the library and campus, and taking the opportunity to do things that hadn’t been done before.”

After living in Montreal, Japan and Winnipeg, Stephanie returned to Vancouver, ready for the next step in her career. Stephanie started her librarianship journey as a UBC iSchool student in the Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) program. She recalls learning about copyright during her studies, “I learned a lot about what the job would entail and it kept me interested and I decided to continue to pursue it in my professional career”.

Stephanie takes the initiative to start her own projects, build expertise and expand her skillset beyond the library: “We are lucky to be in a place where some of the most exciting research in the world is going on, so I always try to remember to go to talks or events on campus,” she says. “It could be an opportunity to get broader insight to what’s going on and what’s important to people on campus.”

In her day-to-day, Stephanie helps graduate students, researchers and faculty members with scholarly communications and copyright compliance. Stephanie is also looking for ways to engage with different groups from the UBC community, and is now working on an Alma Mater Society (AMS) grant-funded project that involves undergraduate student journals.

With her growing network and advocacy for open scholarship practices, she hopes to contribute to her industry by seizing opportunities to work with colleagues across multiple institutions on a local and national level.

Thinking about the next steps in her career, Stephanie is looking forward to publishing her first research paper and hopes to build campus fluency around Open Access and Open Educational Resources. “I believe in the work and it’s important to think about the research and publication process being available and equitable. If we can change people’s workflows or get them to consider publishing Open Access or to put materials in cIRcle, I think that cumulatively has an impact.”

For early career professionals, Stephanie shares, “it’s really important in the beginning to make that effort and get out of your branch or wheelhouse and make connections early on. A lot of the way innovation happens, in my experience, is through serendipitous connections with people.”

Learn more about Scholarly Communications and Open Access

 

 

Introduced as a new service to help UBC Vancouver faculty meet Canadian copyright law and Fair Dealing Requirements, the syllabus service provides them with the ability to upload their course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR), part of the Canvas Learning Management Platform at UBC. It ensures that course materials uphold Canadian copyright law and UBC license agreements and policies.

Copyright infringement, through the distribution of published works to students, unfortunately exposes the University and its faculty to legal jeopardy thus the Library is making copyright compliance as feasible and streamlined as possible for UBC faculty and students.

“We continue to take every possible step to support faculty in their teaching efforts, and ensure they remain knowledgeable and compliant with Canadian copyright law,” says Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital Programs and Services.

 

Read the full Library announcement

 

Explore Copyright Requirements for UBC Faculty and Staff

 

Discover Mediated Course Reserves at UBCO

 

Learn more about Scholarly Communications @ UBC

 

 

 

In our digital project workflow, we first evaluate copyright concerns for the submitted project proposal. Even if the collection contains historically important items to be digitized and preserved, we cannot approve the project if there are copyright restrictions or issues. This post will briefly summarize what you need to know about copyright and digitization. For more detailed information about copyright, please visit Copyright at UBC (Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office).

What is Copyright? Why do we have to care about it in digitization projects?

According to Copyright at UBC, “Copyright is the sole and exclusive right of a copyright owner to produce, reproduce, perform, publish, adapt, translate and telecommunicate a work, and to control the circumstances in which others may do any of these things. Copyright owners grant permission to others through what are legally referred to as licenses.” In the digitization context, we need to ensure the item is in the public domain or we obtain permission in order (1) to make digital copies of the items and (2) to disseminate them[i]. Making digital copies can be considered as “reproducing” the original items, and disseminating as “publishing”.

Our Digital Collection Development Policy of the UBC Library defines the collection review criteria and questions for rights issues as follows:

  1. Does the Library hold copyright for the material to be digitized?
  2. Does the Library have written documentation from the rights owner allowing it to hold a digital copy of the material?
  3. Does the Library require any other permission prior to embarking on the project?

 

As we state in our Project Planning Toolkit, the answers to any of the following questions should be “yes” when digitizing an item and publishing it in Open Collections:

  • Is the material in the public domain?
  • Does UBC hold the copyright to the material?
  • Will the copyright holder give permission to digitize the material?

 

The following collections are examples of how we have dealt with copyright:

Public Domain: Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books

The original items in the Western Manuscripts and Early Printed Books were published between 1245 and 1680. All of the items are out of copyright, and UBC owns the materials in their entirety. Therefore, it could be digitized without worrying about copyright infringement.

[Catholicon], 1460.

Americae sive novi orbis, nova description, 1572.

 

Permission from Copyright holder: BC Sessional Papers[ii]

The items in the BC Sessional Papers collection are protected under parliamentary privilege, which applies to the materials printed by the Legislative Library of British Columbia (LLBC). Parliamentary privilege extended to printed parliamentary publications does not expire. In other words, intellectual property rights are held in perpetuity by Parliament.

In order to make the digital copies of the Sessional Papers and upload to Open Collections, we consulted with the Legislative Assembly Law Clerk and other copyright experts. Both parties signed a non-exclusive digitization and distribution agreement (Legislative Assembly of British Columbia and the University of British Columbia Library Digital Initiatives). By this agreement, the UBC Library has right to preserve and disseminate the Sessional Paper, and add the digitized materials to the UBC Library collections.

LIST OF PERSONS ENTITLED TO VOTE IN THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT OF ESQUIMALT, [1876].

British Columbia. Legislative Assembly, [1929]. REPORT OF LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD, 1927-28.

 

If interested in completing a project with us, please consider copyright issues prior to submitting a proposal.

 


[i] Gertz, J. (2007) 6.6 Preservation and selection for digitization. Northeast Document Center. Available at https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/preservation-leaflets/6.-reformatting/6.6-preservation-and-selection-for-digitization Cited in Balogun, T. (2018). The nexus between digitization, preservation and access in the context of selection of materials for archives. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal), 1893. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/1893

 

[ii] Carr-Harris, M., Curry, G., Graebner, C., Paterson, S., & Rollins, C. (2011). British Columbia Government Publications Digitization Project: Proof of Concept. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b009/ade13b914c3ead37564ead628382b05b78fd.pdf

Join us in conversation on July 11 with the creator of the Public Knowledge Project, Professor John Willinsky. Co-hosted by UBC Library and UBC iSchool.

Image courtesy: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Library

 

Last month, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC participated in the yearly Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week event comprised of presentations followed by a discussion about the value of “fair dealing in a modern Canadian context and highlighting the perspectives of diverse copyright stakeholders”.

 

Watch the archived event Balancing the scales: The role of fair dealing in Canada (Parts One, Two, Three and Four)

 

Explore related items in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal:

 

 

Canadian copyright legislation and archival material

 

The acquisition of literary papers in Canada

 

Building open cultures: the Commons in a digitally networked environment

 

Moral rights of authors in international copyright of the 21st century: time for consolidation?

 

Application of the right of reproduction to the internet: should browsing be considered copyright infringement?

 

Digitally archiving Hula-related objects

 

Developing countries and the international copyright regime: the neglected issue of cultural survival

 

Contested rights in cyberspace

 

UBC Library: Fall update

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Recording of Balancing the scales: The role of fair dealing in Canada now live in UBC’s institutional repository.

The planning committee for the joint SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC Fair Dealing Week event is happy to announce that an archived copy of the talk is now available for viewing in UBC’s institutional repository, cIRcle. Both the panel discussion and Meera Nair’s keynote address are available at the following link:

http://hdl.handle.net/2429/69041

The planning committee would like to thank all who participated virtually and in-person as well as the event sponsors CAUT, UBC, Langara, SFU, Kwantlen, and Douglas for making the event such a success.

 

Image by PDPics on Pixabay

 

In the News: Locally, Nationally, and Internationally

 

Open Access

Balancing the Scales: The Role of Fair Dealing in Canada

(Above webcast was part of Fair Dealing Week – February 25–March 1, 2019)

 

New checklist helps detect deceptive publishers

(Above news release by the University of Toronto)

 

We applaud the Cleveland Museum of Art’s new open-access policy—and here’s what remains to be done

(Above news release by the Wikimedia Foundation)

 

 

Open Data

Data verse-Archivematica Integration Now Available for Testing

(Above news release from the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL))

 

Developing a Library Strategy for 3D and Virtual Reality

(Above podcast from EDUCAUSE Review)

 

New Portage Training Resources Available

(Above news release by the Portage Training Expert Group, launched by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL))

 

 

Open Education

Open Education Week (March 4-8, 2019)

(A global event held annually to recognize and showcase open education in teaching and learning and excellence in education)

 

Open in Action 2019

(Above BCcampus event held on March 6, 2019 featuring speakers from UBC, BCIT, SFU, KPU and BCcampus)

 

Student Savings at Scale: LibreTexts

(Above impact story about open textbooks by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition))

 

Recently added items to cIRcle:

 

Database of Religious History collection:

The Arch of Constantine

Chinese Esoteric Buddhism (Tang Tantrism)

Delphi

Medieval Śrīvaiṣṇavism

Roman Divination

Roman Imperial Cult

 

UBC Library and Archives collection:

Federated Geospatial Data Discovery for Canada: Geodisy

Positive Space Working Group Final Report

 

UBC Lectures, Seminars, and Symposia collection:

The Legacy of Bambule (1970): On the Perils of the Memory Culture of the German 68 Movement

The Metaphysics of Data Capital

 

UBC Faculty Research and Publications collection:

Blending integrated knowledge translation with global health governance: an approach for advancing action on a wicked problem

Extent, trends, and determinants of controller/reliever balance in mild asthma: a 14-year population-based study

Policy review on the management of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia by community health workers in Mozambique

Improving microservice-based applications with runtime placement adaptation

Interventions on children’s and adolescents’ physical activity and sedentary behaviour: protocol for a systematic review from a sex/gender perspective

 

UBC Press collection:

The New NDP: Moderation, Modernization, and Political Marketing [Book Supplement]

 

Undergraduate research collection:

The Potential Effects of Tethered-Based Forest Harvesting Systems on Soil Disturbance in Coastal British Columbia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image by geralt on Pixabay

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Confused about thesis formatting?

 

Next Thesis Formatting: Tips, tricks, and resources workshops are as follows:

 

Dates: March 11th & March 25th, 2019

Time: 10am to 12pm (same workshop held on both dates)

Location: Room 217 – Walter C. Koerner Library

 

Register for March 11th  OR March 25th, 2019

 

Curious about a Lay Summary for your thesis or dissertation? Or for a journal article, etc.?

 

 

Next Lay Summaries: Writing workshop is as follows:

 

Date: Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

Time: 10am to 12pm

Location: Sherrington Room – Woodward Library

  

Register for March 13th, 2019

 

 

Wondering how to navigate and manage the publishing process for your research?

 

Next Scholarly Publishing & Author Rights (off-campus) workshop is as follows:

 

Date: Tuesday, March 26th, 2019

Time: 2-4pm

Location: BC Children’s and Women’s Hospitals, Study and Learning Commons Computer Lab, Shaughnessy Building Room F4

 

Register for March 26th, 2019

 

 

Learn more about:

 

cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

Scholarly Communications @ UBC

 

UBC Research Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing your thesis for UBC graduation? Prepping for UBC 3MT 2018?

 

Working on a slide presentation for a spring/summer conference or other event?

 

Interested in open access? Curious about scholarly publishing? Confused about copyright, author rights and more?

 

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, this free UBC graduate workshop is for you!

 

Showcasing your Graduate Research

in UBC’s Open Access Digital Repository:

Help with Copyright and More (Graduate Pathways to Success)

 

presented by the cIRcle Office and Scholarly Communications and Copyright Services

 

Date: Tuesday, 06 February 2018

Time: 12:30 to 14:00

Location: Thea Koerner House, 6371 Crescent Road

 

Participants will learn to:

 

  • Describe and format their work for deposit in cIRcle, UBC’s open access digital repository
  • See how to apply Creative Commons Licenses to their work
  • Create presentations with good Copyright practices
  • Consult one-on-one with a member of Copyright Services at UBC

 

Register here

 

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible here

 

 

 

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