Image courtesy of Pixabay

 

INTERNATIONAL

Open Access

We Support the UNESCO Recommendation on OER

The role of preprints in research dissemination

A young researcher’s guide to open access publishing

 

Open Access Week 2019

Plan S compliance for Open Access Journals – what we know so far and where we think we’re heading

NOTE: See also Recordings: LINK and Slides: PDF on SlideShare

“Flipping” to (more) open when you’re already open

Preprints and the long and winding road to Open Access

Open and Engaged: Open Access Week at the British Library

Taking the Long View of Open Access

 

Open Data

The State of Open Data Report 2019

 

Open Education

For the Edtech Innovation Today’s Learners Need, Look Not to Companies, But to Campuses

Reaping the benefits of Open Data in public health

 

NATIONAL

SPARC Landscape Analysis

Canadian Science Publishing – Open A Conversation Q&A series for Open Access Week with Dr. Alana Westwood

JHU Press celebrates International Open Access Week by publishing 100 OA books

Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open

 

LOCAL

Open Access Week at UBC

Ongoing Adoption – Estimating, Calculating, and Tracking

BCcampus heads to #OpenEd19

AMS Open Champions Celebration

2019 OER Faculty Panel Roundup

Open, Equitable, Affordable, and Transparent: Progress on the Road to True Open Access: A Talk by Ginny Steel

Can we Decolonize Open? An Open Access Week Event presented by Langara, Kwantlen, BCIT, SFU, and UBC

 

 


The week of March 4th is Open Education Week, an annual celebration of the global Open Education Movement. This year we invite the UBC community to join us and our colleagues from other higher ed institutions from the Lower Mainland at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Richmond campus for a one day “Open in Action” event on March 6th from 8:30-3:15.

More information about the schedule and registration are available on BCcampus’s website.

We hope to see you there.

 key-96233_640

A new version of the cIRcle Non-Exclusive Distribution License (‘the License’) will go into effect on Friday March 7, 2014. This License applies to materials added to cIRcle on or after March 7, 2014.

As before, copyright holders retain their copyright under Version 2.0 of the License. The text of the new License is available here: http://hdl.handle.net/2429/46029.

The License will be applicable to theses and dissertations as well as to all non-thesis work in cIRcle. (Up until March 7, 2014, there is a separate license for theses and dissertations).

For the first time, the License will provide re-use rights. The Re-use rights spell out the conditions under which people who find your work in cIRcle are allowed to re-use that work.

This Creative Commons license is known as the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs, or CC BY-NC-ND license. The text of the license is available here: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/. More details will be announced shortly so stay tuned.

Did You Know?

In cIRcle, authors can select and attach a Creative Commons License to their work thus stipulating how others can share, remix, or reuse their work. Learn more about Creative Commons License Conditions. See an example of a Creative Commons License in cIRcle. (Click on ‘Creative Commons’ hyperlink under the section which reads, “The following license files are associated with this item.”)

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay

ebookCame across this…

“The Little Cree Books below are the first in what we hope will become a large collection of online books designed for early Cree readers. Please check out the About the Project section of this website to learn more…” –Little Cree Books

maskosis okîsikâm (Little Bear’s Day)

askiw meskocipayowina (The Seasons)

Note: Creative Commons copyright licensing applies to all of the books, unless otherwise noted.

The freedom of the Internet and the digital age has challenged the role of copyright. What should copyright look like when information can be moved so freely? Should we continue to protect intellectual property and authorship the way we always have?
Tina Piper, co-Director of Creative Commons Canada will explain how Creative Commons offers an alternative to traditional copyright. Creative Commons is a non-profit group that develops licenses which allow authors/rights-holder to alter the conditions of use on their copyrighted works. Creative Commons defines the spectrum of possibilities between full copyright — all rights reserved — and the public domain — no rights reserved. Learn how Creative Commons licenses help authors and creators keep their copyright while inviting certain uses of your work — a “some rights reserved” copyright.

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet