With smartphones in their pockets and tablets in their backpacks, students growing up in the digital era are the most connected generation yet. But, as UBC’s Ron Darvin notes, simply having access to digital tools doesn’t mean all students are on a level playing field. Darvin, a PhD student in the faculty of education and a UBC Public Scholar, examines how students of different socio-economic backgrounds develop digital skills—and why some children are at risk of being left behind.

read full article: http://news.ubc.ca/2017/01/12/ubc-expert-some-b-c-kids-at-risk-of-falling-behind-in-digital-literacy

using_computerThe Faculty of Education and UBC Library have teamed up to introduce UBC’s first LOOC – or local open online course.

The offering, part of UBC’s Master of Educational Technology program, is meant to help UBC students, staff and faculty hone their digital literacy skills. The course, called M101, features topics including Mining (research), Meshing (idea creation) and Mobilizing (generating value from information and knowledge).

The LOOC is open to all members of the UBC community who have a campus-wide login. M101 is self-paced, and users can build their skills in any area, in any order that they wish. As the name suggests, a LOOC is a localized form of a MOOC – or massive open online course. MOOCs have been a big topic in online education recently and UBC’s first MOOC – which launched in January 2013 with Stanford University – attracted more than 130,000 registrants.

The LOOC project received a grant from UBC’s Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund in spring 2013. Work began in April, and the LOOC was opened to co-authors of content, including UBC librarians, in July. The first set of students from the MET program will be able to contribute as of September.

For more, visit UBC Library’s site.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has released the Programme for International Student Assessment’s Report 12, which investigated if boys and girls are ready for the digital age.

Key findings are:

  • More than 17% of students in Australia, Korea and New Zealand are top performers in digital reading, while fewer than 3% of students in Austria, Chile and Poland are. 
  • On average, girls outperform boys in digital reading; however, the gender gap is narrower than it is in print-reading proficiency.
  • Among boys and girls with similar levels of proficiency in print reading, boys tend to have stronger digital navigation skills and therefore score higher in digital reading.

Click here to read the full report.

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