It is a pleasure to announce the release of cIRcle, UBC’s Research Repository Impact and Activity Report for 2018-2019!

 

In 2018-2019, cIRcle continued its focus on increasing faculty content with over 1,000 new items added – that’s a 9.6% increase from last year.

 

Examples of some new and ongoing cIRcle partnerships include the following: Database of Religious History (DRH) entries, Transnational Business Governance Interactions (TBGI) Working Papers, audio and video recordings of the Vancouver Institute Lectures, a mix of textual and other media content of the From the Ground Up: Buddhism & East Asian Religions, School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) Graduating Projects, and the UBC Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies’ Ziegler Series of video lecture recordings.

 

Another cIRcle highlight is the newly automated ingest stream of faculty content published by Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) via the SWORD (Simple Web-Service Offering Repository Deposit) protocol as well as cIRcle’s collaborative work in enhancing metadata and digital preservation with Artefactual and Atmire.

 

Discover UBC research in cIRcle – from preprints and postprints of journal articles to conference proceedings to departmental publications and technical reports to lecture/course notes, and much more.

 

Learn more about cIRcle

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

News Release from Research Data Alliance (RDA): 

 

The Research Data Alliance (RDA) and the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) are pleased to announce an agreement to work together to strengthen and expand capacities for research data management within the international data repository community.

COAR and RDA have a shared mission to improve access and use of research outputs, leading to better research and new discoveries. As part of this agreement, the organizations intend to coordinate more closely on strategic initiatives of shared interest, regularly exchange information about activities, and conduct joint webinars and events to support common aims.

 

Read the full press release

 

About Research Data Management (RDM) at UBC

 

Explore RDM items in Open Collections

 

Make your UBC research openly accessible via cIRcle

 

 

 

 

 

The BC Research Libraries Group is proud to present

“Your Interdisciplinary Web Archive Collaboration”

Nick Ruest
Digital Assets Librarian, York University
Co-Principal Investigator, “The Archives Unleashed Project” (Andrew. W. Mellon Foundation-funded)
Co-Principal Investigator, “A Longitudinal Analysis of the Canadian World Wide Web as a Historical Resource, 1996-2014” (SSHRC grant)
Co-Principal Investigator, “Research Platforms and Portals Web Archive for Longitudinal Knowledge” (Compute Canada)


Time:
Friday, February 16, 2018, 10:00-11:30 am

Location: SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Room 1800

Attendance: If you would like to attend in person, please register. For those who cannot attend in person, a live stream is also available.

Abstract:
Web archives are intimidating. You’re dealing with size and scale issues, wild formats from the live web, and just a massive amount of information to sift through. But, we can’t hide our heads in the sand, and ignore it. This is our cultural heritage, and we need to make sense of it. You definitely don’t want to tackle this alone, and the good news is that there has been a lot of work done already, and there are a lot of great people working here. Nick Ruest will discuss the research and tools he is working on with an interdisciplinary team of collaborators from fields as varied as history, political science, sociology, and computer science to help make sense of it all.

About the presenter:
Nick Ruest
is the Digital Assets Librarian at York University, where he oversees the development of data curation, asset management and preservation initiatives, along with creating and implementing systems that support the capture, description, delivery, and preservation of digital objects having significant content of enduring value. He was previously active in the Islandora and Fedora communities, serving as Project Director for the Islandora CLAW project, member of the Islandora Foundation’s Roadmap Committee and Board of Directors, and contributed code to the project. He has also served as the Release Manager for Islandora and Fedora, the moderator for the OCUL Digital Curation Community, the President of the Ontario Library and Technology Association, and President of McMaster University Academic Librarians’ Association.

The Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL) is pleased to recognize Bronwen Sprout of the University of British Columbia Library with its 2016 Outstanding Contribution Award.

The Berkeley Poster Collection, housed at the UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections, contains 250 posters created between 1968 to 1973 which document the advocacy and activism of student groups during the Vietnam War era. These posters attest to the tense political climate present in the United States and South East Asia during that time and the efforts of underground and guerilla groups to tap into the social conscience, pressing for greater awareness and public concern regarding the Vietnam War.

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“Peace on Nixon”, 1973

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“USA Stop Policing the World”, 1973 (with perforated edges of printer paper visible)

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“America is a Democracy…”, 1973

At the Digitization Centre we frequently revisit and assess the quality of our digitized collections. As time passes our capacity to produce higher-quality digital images often improves due to newer equipment or scanning techniques. In the case of the Berkeley Poster Collection the images currently available through Open Collections were originally scanned in 2009. It is therefore not surprising that our facilities and equipment have changed so significantly that we’re now revisiting this collection to improve upon the current digital images we have!

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A digitization student prepares posters for rescanning

Additionally, a large number of the posters were printed on discarded computer paper which was repurposed for the posters. A significant portion of these pages have computer code and data on the verso of the poster images – information which was not included in the original digital images but which has now been deemed important enough to include in this new round of scans. This type of “ephemera” not only offers insight into the type of work that early computers were doing at Berkeley in the sixties and seventies but also provides contextual information which situates this collection in a very specific time and location.

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Verso of poster containing computer code

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“America Saves the World”, 1973, ready to be rescanned

Sometimes it can be a challenge to assess all of the possible “values” that a historical item may have which is why it is so important to revisit and reassess digitized collections over time.

If you would like to browse the Berkeley Poster Collection, click here. To learn more about the equipment that we are using to rescan the posters check out this previous blog post on the topic!

Way back in January UBC Library scored a rare book coup, acquiring two exceptional examples of early gay literature that share a connection with famed Victorian writer Oscar Wilde.

Teleny and its prequel, Des Grieux, were first published in the 1890s. It’s long been suspected, but never confirmed, that Wilde may have authored or contributed to the texts.

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Click here to see Des Grieux.

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Click here to see Teleny.

Now both of these texts are available for online study and access through Open Collections. (But be aware before you click- this literature is a bit racy – don’t let anyone ever tell you the library isn’t exciting!)

“Even if Wilde didn’t write them, the speculation is still a fascinating part of his enduring mythology,” said Gregory Mackie, Assistant Professor in UBC’s Dept. of English.

Only five known sets of the two-volume publication Teleny remain, and there are only three known copies of Des Grieux. UBC is the only collection in the world with both texts- and now you can see them too!

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We’ve got another new (but actually really really old) addition to our digital collection. We’re excited to share that we have digitized a rare Latin Bible from the 13th century! You can check it out in out Western Manuscripts collection where many of our oldest books live.

 

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The pages are made from vellum or dried calf skin as most books were at that time.

This Bible is an amazing addition to our collection for a few reasons. First, it was a Student Bible made in Oxford England around 1250 AD, something that at the time was pretty remarkable. Back then most Student Bibles were produced on the continent, typically in Paris, for university pupils and professors who used them for their studies. This makes our Bible unique – and the only one like it in a Canadian collection.

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This book contains a fair amount of marginalia! Check out all the faded notes on the side.

A second special aspect of this Bible is the concordance at the end of the book. The concordance, pictured below, is an index created for the Bible on where to find certain words or phrases within the book.

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Click here to see the concordance for yourself!

One of the early owners created this concordance shortly after the book was finished. The concordance is obviously not part of the original book. We don’t know exactly when or who created it – and if any of you scholars out there want to try to find out, take a shot and let us know about it! We wholeheartedly support you!

Even you are not a scholar take a look at the book for yourself, or take a look at the UBC press release on this book. It might make you into a bibliophile!

Digitization of BC Sessional Papers, from 1933-1952,
 is on its way.

Phase 3 of Sessional Papers has been approved and digitization will start this summer! This phase will look at 41 bound volumes from the British Columbia Sessional Papers. It will increase our current collection by 19 years – and as an added bonus there will be fold out maps and charts to check out.

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More maps like this are coming to you soon!

The Sessional Papers are important provincial legislative documents that capture the economical, historical, political, and cultural atmosphere of British Columbia history. The Sessional Papers include official committee reports, orders of the day, petitions and papers presented, records of land sales, correspondence, budgetary estimates, proclamations, maps, voters lists by district, and departmental annual reports.

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There’s tons of historical content! – For a belated celebration of International Women’s Day – Sessional papers has women petitioning for the vote in Canada

Click here to visit our digital collections page to view the volumes we have digitized.

Click here to read more about what sessional papers are and how they can be utilized for research.

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Right now digitized content in Sessional Papers runs from 1878 to 1931

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You can find all sorts of things in Sessional Papers – take a look now and keep your eyes peeled for more coming soon!

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