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The fifth annual Aboriginal (Un) History Month exhibit is now on display at UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. 

This exhibit asks the question “Whose 150?” and explores the rich Indigenous history and culture in Canada. The eight cases include video, maps, video animated graphics, stories and histories – aimed at encouraging conversation and learning about the broader context of Canada’s 150.  

“This year, many Canadians are celebrating the 150th anniversary of Canada. For them, the development of Canada from a colony to an independent nation is the story of the emergence of a democratic nation exceptional in both its history and promise. That is, however, a history that looks very different to many Indigenous people in Canada…By truthfully and directly addressing the history and current circumstances of Indigenous people—and acting upon what we come to understand—we can work together to make Canada a country and a society we can all more fully join in celebrating.” – Linc Kesler, Director, First Nations House of Learning

Exhibit partners include the Musqueam First Nation, UBC’s Museum of Anthropology, UBC’s Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre and UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

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For more information on the themes of the cases, visit the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre website

The exhibit is open to the public daily from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2, and will be on display until August 30, 2017.

 

UBC is located on the traditional, ancestral, unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people.

 

About Aboriginal (Un)History Month

The “un” represents the continued importance and relevance of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world. These contributions should be recognized daily, not just once a year. The first Aboriginal (Un)History Month event kicked off in June 2012.

 

Exhibit partners

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Gallery

   

A century's worth of the Prince George Citizen was digitized thanks to support from the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

International Students’ Day is celebrated annually on November 17. It is a day of both commemoration and celebration: a chance to recognize the 1939 Nazi German storming of Czech universities and the resulting arrests and deaths of hundreds of students; and a chance to celebrate and support the continued activism of student communities around the world today.

Here at the Digitization Centre, we’ve decided to feature some of our collection items which highlight student activism at UBC over the course of the last several decades. Student protests, sit-ins and other forms of activism give voice to the needs and rights of UBC’s student body, and have, at times,  led to widespread and progressive institutional change.

Perhaps the earliest student protest at UBC was known as the Great Trek, when nearly 1,200 students marched from downtown Vancouver to the unfinished Point Grey campus to protest government inaction on construction of the new university. To learn more about the Great Trek, check out this article from The Ubyssey.

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Great Trek at Georgia and Granville streets, 1922

In 1968, due to overcrowding on-campus and a perceived lack of long-term vision for higher education in the province, over 1,000 students staged a massive sit-in to “liberate” UBC’s Faculty Club. The atmosphere of resistance and unrest coincided with a visit by American activist Jerry Rubin, and was no doubt informed by the radical activism taking place on university campuses across the border in the United States. As a result of the sit-in, a campus-wide day of reflection took place in order to address student concerns, and student involvement in the University’s governing bodies increased. For more information on this interesting period in the University’s history, click here and here.

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Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

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Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

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Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968

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The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968

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The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968

Other forms of action and activism have taken place at UBC campus in the intervening years, and we will undoubtedly see more such events in the future.

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School of Architecture paint-in, 1974

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Student Robin Wiley speaking at tuition fee increase protest, 1995

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Point Grey beach erosion protestors prevent start of erosion control project, 1974

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Students sitting on floor of Administration building, ca. 1970

The Indigitization project brought past program participants together in June 2016 to discuss digitization practices and Indigenous knowledge in communities. The article appears in Issue 4 of BCLA Perspectives.
The Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL) is pleased to recognize Bronwen Sprout of the University of British Columbia Library with its 2016 Outstanding Contribution Award.

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