photo(23)We’ve put up a great collection of books over here at the Education Library that we feel capture the idea of celebrating diversity.  From books that have main characters of different backgrounds to picture books showcasing what it’s like to grow up in different cultures to kids’ books that embrace loving who you are and those around you –we have a great selection to browse!

Coincidentally, this display coincides with the launching of the #WeNeedDiverseDooks campaign on Twitter, Tumblr and the Internet-at-large.

Read more about this much needed campaign, which has gone viral almost overnight, in this Salon article.

Happy reading!



This session presents two tales of Canadian multiculturalism in general and multicultural education in particular. One tale is of a common sense, dominant multicultural education that underscores multiculturalism as a symbol and premiere characteristic of Canada. There may have been some critiques from the left and the right in the past and there’s always the awkwardness of Quebec’s interculturalism and intercultural education but these are past and peripheral matters that do little to trouble the idea that Canada and its approach to diversity education are decidedly multicultural. A rather different tale emerges when we consider multiculturalism and multicultural education in the context of global developments such as “the death of multiculturalism” discourse, the emergence of European interculturalism and intercultural education and even national and local developments of a variety of school board approaches to diversity, all of which constitutes cracks in the façade of a completely dominant Canadian multiculturalism and multicultural education. The invitation is for us to consider what the future of diversity education ought to be locally and nationally given the contradictory state of affairs of complacently hegemonic Canadian multiculturalism and multicultural education on the one hand and passé, challenged and undermined multiculturalism and multicultural education on the other.

Biography

Handel Kashope Wright is currently Professor and Director of the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education http://www.ccie.educ.ubc.ca. He has published extensively on continental African cultural studies, cultural studies of education, critical multiculturalism, anti-racist education, qualitative research and post-reconceptualization curriculum theorizing.


Select Articles Available at UBC Library

Wright, H.K. (2011). Everything Old Ought to be New Again: Post-Reconceptualization Curriculum as Presentist Praxis. Journal of curriculum and pedagogy, 8 (1), 19-22. Link: http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/external?sid=e7779cf4-89f1-40e6-b418-5e8196e2b92e%40sessionmgr114&vid=2&hid=123

Wright, H.K. (2006). Are we (T)here Yet? Qualitative Research in Education’s Profuse and Contested Present. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 19 (6), 793-802. Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09518390600979273#.UZ0x-6KG2So


UBC Library Research Guides

Canadian Studies

Cultural Diversity, Multiculturalism, Prejudice, and Racism Biography

Education


The role of libraries will be examined — specifically the Education Library, First Nations House of Learning Xwi7xwa Library, and more broadly, school libraries. The re-imagined teacher education program has inspired revision in the role Education librarians play to respectfully and meaningfully integrate First Nations history, content, and world-views; commit to inquiry and research oriented education; and emphasize diversity and social and ecological justice. Our libraries can support teacher candidates as they acquire theoretical understandings for teaching and apply those theories in their practice. We bring teacher candidates and ideas together in library spaces that offer unique learning environments, where inquiry, collaboration, the role of Indigenous Knowledge, relationships and ways of knowing are celebrated. This session will be interactive: we present our re-imagined roles and seek feedback and ideas to further ensure our relevance for faculty and teacher candidates.

Speakers include: Jo-Anne Naslund, Acting Head, Instructional Programs Librarian, Education Library; Education Library; Sarah Dupont, Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, First Nations House of Learning—Xwi7xwa Library.

About the Speakers

Jo-Anne Naslund is the Instructional Programs Librarian at the Education Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialties are in Canadian children’s literature, children’s literature, and education.

Sarah Dupont is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and at Xwi7xwa Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialty is in First Nations sources.


Select Articles Available at UBC

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Celebrate Science Fundraiser for CCBC. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6. [Link]

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Inuit Publisher. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6 [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

Library, Archival, and Information Science

Subject Resources for First Nations

Social justice, diversity and aboriginal perspectives will be dominant themes in all courses offered by the University of B.C. education faculty starting next fall as a result of a program overhaul that’s been in the works for several years.

The subjects won’t be taught as separate courses but will be infused throughout the curriculum, Associate Dean Rita Irwin said in an interview this week. “The program will have a very different look and feel,” she noted.

There will also be greater emphasis on research and inquiry, along with a requirement for student teachers to complete an alternative practicum in a non-school setting — such as a community centre, a museum, or even a senior-citizens’ home. That’s intended to open students’ eyes to a variety of work opportunities beyond the often-tight job market for generalist teachers in Metro schools.

“It will help our graduates understand what they can do with their Bachelor of Education degree,” Irwin explained.

The exceptional emphasis on diversity will better prepare teachers for work in classrooms that include students with special needs and behavioural challenges. A special focus on aboriginal perspectives will help teachers encourage success among aboriginal students while also teaching all children to appreciate aboriginal culture, Irwin said.

While these studies are not new at UBC, they will no longer be confined to a separate course with lessons to be learned and set aside. Rather, they will be embedded throughout the program, which represents a change for both students and faculty, she added.

Asked what new students are likely to find most surprising upon entering the education faculty, Irwin said it is the ever-growing emphasis on professionalism and the message that once they become teachers, their actions — and their relationships with students in particular — will be under constant review.

“That’s an eye-opener for many of them,” Irwin said.

Last year, approximately 2,700 new teachers were certified in B.C. but only 1,500 new teaching positions were available, the university says. Nevertheless, Irwin says, there are still plenty of opportunities for graduates, including jobs teaching abroad.

BY JANET STEFFENHAGEN, VANCOUVER SUN

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