Guest post by Elizabeth Simmons, Graduate Academic Assistant, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office

You’ve probably heard about Amazon’s new service that offers monthly subscribers unlimited access to eBooks on their Kindles.  Well, guess what? There are plenty of free, open access eBooks available online—you just have to know where to look!

Project Gutenberg is an amazing resource, with more than 45,000 free e-books available to everyone, anywhere, including many that you can download. Browse their list of Partners, Affiliates, and Resources for even more free e-books. Other resources include the Internet Archive and Open Library and Google Books.

UBC has eBooks too! Find them in the Library’s catalogue at: Click on “More Options” and you’ll be given the chance to limit search results to eBooks that are “Open Access for Everyone.” When limiting your search to eBooks available only to UBC faculty, staff, and students, you’ll gain access to a plethora of other eBooks.

Members of the UBC community are actively supporting open scholarship initiatives in the library and beyond, with the goal of “encouraging unrestricted access to research and scholarly publishing.” Learn more about them at UBC:  And, don’t miss Open UBC Week 2014 on October 28th & 29th, featuring open lectures, information sessions, workshops, and more!

Did You Know?

“The University creates and advances knowledge and understanding, and improves the quality of life through the discovery, dissemination, and application of research within and across disciplines”. – From UBC’s Research Excellence – Strategic Priorities

Above image is courtesy of Pixabay


The eDuke Ebook linking issue has been fixed.  Please continue to submit tickets to the Eresource & Access unit if you encounter any issues:

Some eDuke ebooks are linking to DOI error messages because they are not yet published on the eDuke site.  We are in contact with Duke University Press to fix the problem and will soon update our eDuke holdings to reflect only those ebooks that are accessible.

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Thank you for your patience.

Celebrated annually on March 8th, the official theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is “Equality for women is progress for all” (United Nations). The following is a selection of recently published online books acquired by the library which explore women’s achievements in business, entrepreneurship and leadership:

To access any of these books, click onto the book title, then click onto the orange “online access” button on the right hand side of the screen.

Drop by the David Lam Library to find more online and print books in these areas.

KnovelThe ebook aggregator Knovel is pulling all its Wiley-Blackwell titles at the end of March. They had pulled access earlier, but restored it temporarily.

The reason behind the pulling is that the agreement between Wiley and Knovel was not renewed for 2014. This is a decision between these two companies: the publisher Wiley and the platform Knovel.



Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (or as the cool kids call it, DSM -V), is unavailable via PsychiatryOnline. The subscription has expired and there are problems setting up a renewal.

Sorry for the inconvenience.

Stay Tuned!

HarvardOver 400 Harvard University Press ebooks (almost all from 2011, 2012 or 2013) are now available via De Gruyter. In a few weeks, you should be able to find these titles within  Summon and the UBC Library Catalogue.

For now, feel free to browse the Harvard Titles here. NOTE: Some titles are not yet published and are marked as slated to be published later this year.

WileyThe Wiley Online Library is experiencing problems exporting citations to RefWorks. To get around this, please try the following:


*In Wiley Online Library:*

  • 1. Perform your search.
  • 2. Click the boxes beside the references you wish to export.
  • 3. Select *Export Citation* at the top of the search results.
  • 4. A new window will open. Using the drop-down menu beside Format, select *Plain Text* and select whether you would like just the Citation or the Citation & Abstract beside Export Type.
  • 5. Click *Submit*.
  • 6. A new window will open prompting you to save the file to your computer.

*In your RefWorks account:*

  • 1. Go to *References ? Import*.
  • 2. Select *RIS Format* as your Import Filter/Data Source and *Multiple Databases* as your Database.
  • 3. Click *Browse*.
  • 4. Find the .txt file you saved to your computer in Step 6 above and upload it.
  • 5. Click *Import* to import your references into RefWorks.




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