This seminar focuses on the potential and pedagogical possibilities of place/community/experience–based learning to act as a decolonizing force in teacher education. In this seminar, we will share the experience of an Indigenous educator who sought to work with a group of graduate students to understand how participation in place–based service learning could affect graduate students’ understanding of: a) local social and ecological issues (particularly those affecting local Indigenous groups), b) feelings of efficacy with respect to the work of social change, and c) motivation to be involved in such efforts. This research project fits within a larger strategy of the UBC–Community Learning Initiative (UBC–CLI) to encourage the engagement of students, faculty, staff, and community to work collaboratively on projects that seek to address complex community priorities in ways that also support student learning.

Speaker Biographies

Tracy Friedel’s research interests include First Nation and Métis experience in the realm of work and learning, decolonizing research at the intersection of health and education, Nehiyaw-Métis oral histories, and Indigenous-focused outdoor/land/place-based education. As part of this latter interest, she has engaged with community-based partners in the Lower Mainland of BC, and Haida Gwaii, to create meaningful academic service learning experiences for UBC graduate students.  In extending upon earlier research, she is the Principal Investigator of a community-based project focused on Indigenous youth leadership in the area of unintentional injury prevention.  Friedel is interested in pursuing inquiry via means of Indigenous methodologies, community-based participatory research, qualitative case studies, visual research methods, oral hi(stories), and critical race theory in qualitative research.

Mahtab Eskandari’s fields of interest are in curriculum and pedagogy.  She has been an educator as a Science, ESL, Arts and Anthropology teacher since 1998.  Eskandari started with the Bachelor of Science in Molecular Biology and Genetics in Iran; and traveling as an international rural educator, she found interest in Anthropology, Social studies and Environmental education in international indigenous communities. She enjoys working with teachers in practicum settings and communicating and interacting with different generations and cultures towards improving learning and teaching.  Over the years Eskandari has researched active and dynamic integration of technology (with a focus on animation and decolonizing network systems) and museum learning in teacher education as well as multicultural education.

Allyson’s background in Early Childhood Development, Aboriginal Health, and Aboriginal Education focused on bridging the gap between academic research and community driven needs. Her work at the UBC-CLI aims to better understand the impacts of Community Based Experiential Learning on the three key stakeholder groups with whom we work: community organizations, students, and faculty.

Kyle Nelson is the the Community Based Experiential Learning Officer at UBC. Kyle is a big believer in the University’s role in building community capacity, and is a key player in strengthening and sustaining community based experiential learning (CBEL) opportunities for UBC students.  Kyle jointly reports to UBC’s Community Learning Initiative (UBC-CLI) and the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. The UBC-CLI helps to integrate CBEL into academic disciplines and to ensure that meaningful community engagement opportunities are available outside the context of coursework as well.


Select Articles Available at UBC Library 

Friedel, T.L. (2011). Looking for learning in all the wrong places: Urban Native youths’ cultured response to Western-oriented place-based learning. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Special Issue – Youth Resistance Revisited24 (5), 531-546.  Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09518398.2011.600266#.UZZsBqKsiSo

Friedel, T. L. (2008). (Not so) crude text and images: staging Native in ‘big oil’advertising. Visual Studies23(3), 238-254.  Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14725860802489908#.UZZtsqKsiSo


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Education

Aboriginal Studies

Education

DSC_9877_a

Professor Stephen Toope, the 12th president of the University of British Columbia, will leave on June 30, 2014 to pursue academic and professional interests in international law and international relations, UBC Board of Governors Chair Bill Levine announced today. “Professor Toope’s accomplishments during his tenure as president have been truly outstanding,” said Levine. “His vision and passion for UBC are clearly visible through the development and implementation of his strategic vision, Place and Promise.”  Toope was named 12th president and vice-chancellor of the University of British Columbia on March 22, 2006 and began his second five-year term in July 2011.

To read the rest of this UBC Public Affairs’ Media Release, visit: http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/2013/04/03/stephen-toope-to-leave-ubc-presidency-in-june-2014/.  

Did You Know?

cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository has a specific collection which contains speeches and opinion pieces by UBC President Stephen Toope and is updated annually. Under the Office of the President community, visit the Speeches by UBC President Stephen J. Toope collection at: https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/25805.

Above partial text in italics and image are courtesy of UBC Public Affairs



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Reads Sustainability. The Art of Fermentation is the most comprehensive guide to do-it-yourself home fermentation ever published. Sandor Katz presents the concepts and processes behind fermentation in ways that are simple enough to guide a reader through their first experience making sauerkraut or yogurt, and in-depth enough to provide greater understanding and insight for experienced practitioners. While Katz expertly contextualizes fermentation in terms of biological and cultural evolution, health and nutrition, and even economics, this is primarily a compendium of practical information—how the processes work; parameters for safety; techniques for effective preservation; troubleshooting; and more. With full-color illustrations and extended resources, this book provides essential wisdom for cooks, homesteaders, farmers, gleaners, foragers, and food lovers of any kind who want to develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for arguably the oldest form of food preservation, and part of the roots of culture itself. Readers will find detailed information on fermenting vegetables; sugars into alcohol (meads, wines, and ciders); sour tonic beverages; milk; grains and starchy tubers; beers (and other grain-based alcoholic beverages); beans; seeds; nuts; fish; meat; and eggs, as well as growing mold cultures, using fermentation in agriculture, art, and energy production, and considerations for commercial enterprises. Sandor Katz has introduced what will undoubtedly remain a classic in food literature, and is the first—and only—of its kind.

Biography

Sandor Ellix Katz is a self-taught fermentation experimentalist. Katz has taught hundreds of fermentation workshops across North America and beyond, taking on a role he describes as a “fermentation revivalist.” Now, in The Art of Fermentation, with a decade more experience behind him, the unique opportunity to hear countless stories about fermentation practices, and answering thousands of troubleshooting questions, he’s sharing a more in-depth exploration of the topic.


Select Books Available at UBC Library

Katz, Sandor Ellix. (2012). The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes From Around the World. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing. [Link]

Katz, Sandor Ellix. (2006). The Revolution Will Not Be Mirowaved: Inside America’s Underground Food Movements. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Food Science

Sustainability

Body Fit: Health, Nutrition and Fitness



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Faculty of Education CREATE series. This hands-on presentation will discuss and showcase opportunities for effective use of technology-enhanced pedagogies in teacher education, as well as K-12 Mathematics and Science classrooms. We will focus on electronic-response systems (or clickers) and discuss how they can be implemented in K-12 classrooms and in teacher education. We will also brainstorm opportunities for bridging the gap between educational research teaching practice through creating research-informed resources for technology-enhanced teaching. We will showcase our new initiative “Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning through Technologies” project, supported by the Faculty of Education and Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (http://scienceres-edcp-educ.sites.olt.ubc.ca/ ). Marina Milner-Bolotin is Assistant Professor, Science Education, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy.

About the Speaker

Dr. Marina Milner-Bolotin is a science educator within the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy. She specializes in science (physics) teaching and studies ways of using technology to promote student interest in science. She has taught physics and mathematics to a wide range of students: from elementary gifted students to university undergraduates in science programs and future teachers. She also has led a number of professional development activities for science in-service and pre-service teachers and university faculty: from LoggerPro training workshops, to clicker and tablet training, and to physics content presentations at conferences and PD days. Some of her research interests include: Action Research, Educational Technologies, Pedagogy, and Science Education. For more information about Dr. Milner-Bolotin, please visit her website at http://edcp.educ.ubc.ca/faculty/marina-milner-bolotin


Select Articles Available

Milner-Bolotin, Marina. (2012). Growing Water Pearls. Science Teacher. 79(5). pp. 38-42. [Link]

Milner-Bolotin, Marina. (2012). Increasing Interactivity and Authenticity of Chemistry Instruction Through Data Acquisition Systems and Other Technologies. Journal of Chemical Education. 89(4). pp. 477-481. [Link]

Milner-Bolotin, M; Antimirova, T; Petrov, A. (2011). Clickers Beyond the First-Year Science Classroom. Journal of College Science Teaching. 40(2). pp. 14-18. [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Education

Educational Leadership

Globally, there is an effort to end the double discrimination of gender and age experienced by girls.

Click here to read the full article in the Vancouver Sun, written by Daphne Bramham.


The role of libraries will be examined — specifically the Education Library, First Nations House of Learning Xwi7xwa Library, and more broadly, school libraries. The re-imagined teacher education program has inspired revision in the role Education librarians play to respectfully and meaningfully integrate First Nations history, content, and world-views; commit to inquiry and research oriented education; and emphasize diversity and social and ecological justice. Our libraries can support teacher candidates as they acquire theoretical understandings for teaching and apply those theories in their practice. We bring teacher candidates and ideas together in library spaces that offer unique learning environments, where inquiry, collaboration, the role of Indigenous Knowledge, relationships and ways of knowing are celebrated. This session will be interactive: we present our re-imagined roles and seek feedback and ideas to further ensure our relevance for faculty and teacher candidates.

Speakers include: Jo-Anne Naslund, Acting Head, Instructional Programs Librarian, Education Library; Education Library; Sarah Dupont, Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, First Nations House of Learning—Xwi7xwa Library.

About the Speakers

Jo-Anne Naslund is the Instructional Programs Librarian at the Education Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialties are in Canadian children’s literature, children’s literature, and education.

Sarah Dupont is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and at Xwi7xwa Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialty is in First Nations sources.


Select Articles Available at UBC

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Celebrate Science Fundraiser for CCBC. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6. [Link]

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Inuit Publisher. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6 [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

Library, Archival, and Information Science

Subject Resources for First Nations

You are cordially invited to re-imagine the role of libraries – specifically the Education Library, First Nations House of Learning Xwi7xwa Library, and more broadly, school libraries will be examined.

The re-imagined teacher education program has inspired revision in the role Education librarians play to respectfully and meaningfully integrate First Nations history, content, and world-views; commit to inquiry and research oriented education; and emphasize diversity and social and ecological justice. Our libraries can support teacher candidates as they acquire theoretical understandings for teaching and apply those theories in their practice. We bring teacher candidates and ideas together in library spaces that offer unique learning environments, where inquiry, collaboration, the role of Indigenous Knowledge, relationships and ways of knowing are celebrated. This session will be interactive: we present our re-imagined roles and seek feedback and ideas to further ensure our relevance for faculty and teacher candidates.

Presented by:

Sarah Dupont
Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, First Nations House of Learning—Xwi7xwa Library

 Jo-Anne Naslund

Instructional Programs Librarian, Education Library

Danielle Winn
Reference and Instruction Librarian, Education Library

Scarfe Building, Education Library Room 155, 12:30pm

Your one stop shop for field trip information!

Date: Monday, October 1, 2012, 3:00 – 6:00pm (arrive when you can)

Location: VanDusen Botanical Garden – 5251 Oak Street, Vancouver BC

  • Meet the educators from over 50 field trip sites
  • Opportunities to win a free field trip for your class
  • Bus bursaries for charter transportation
  • Refreshments for pre-registered guests
  • Free parking – draw for those who can show a transit ticket!

TEACHER REGISTRATION IS OPEN.  Click here to register.

Advanced registration is required to attend. This is an adult only event due to liquor licensing.

Bring a colleague to the event. Print a poster for your staff room (see below). 

field_trip_fair_for_teachers.pdf

~text from the B.C. Field Trips Website

The conference program features a range of sessions that will interest teacher-librarians and educators from all levels, and anyone interested in improving their teaching skills in literacy (e.g. visual, critical, etc.), research, and technology.  Please contact Heather Daly if you have questions: hdaly@sd43.bc.ca or 604-937-6380.

Keynotes include: Dr. David Loertscher, San José State University School of Library & Information Science and Chris Kennedy, CEO / Superintendent of Schools, School District #45 West Vancouver.  Featured speakers include: Dr. Joanne de Groot, Dr. Ann Ewbank, Adrienne Gear, Judith Comfort, and over thirty other amazing educators.

October 18 and 19

Riverside Secondary School, Port Coquitlam

Detailed program information and registration is now available here.

~text from the BCTLA Coquitlam 2012 Website

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