UBC Librarians Recommend Part 2

From the latest adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel Emma to author Liu Cixn’s classic Three-Body Problem, this is the second instalment in a series of recommendations from UBC librarians and library staff. Find your next novel, film or documentary in UBC Library’s online collections.

Independent learning

Independent Learning graphic

Stephanie Savage, Scholarly Communications and Copyright Librarian, has been preoccupied with thoughts about the economy and capitalism in recent months. “As a result, I have been reading books about class, wealth and consumerism,” she says. Stephanie recommends My life with things: the consumer diaries by Elizabeth Chin: “My Life with Things is a meditation on the author’s relationship with consumer goods and highlights the cultural value and significance of possessions and consumption.”

“Sociologist Rachel Sherman’s Uneasy street: the anxieties of affluence is a revealing and fascinating look at how today’s elite view their wealth and place in society,” Stephanie shares.

Kimberly Fama, Reference Librarian at David Lam Library, has been finding motivation in Angela Duckworth’s book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. “This book offers invaluable lessons using anecdotes, scientific evidence and personal stories that will make you realize that hard work and perseverance can play a bigger role in achieving success rather than just having natural talent,” Kim explains.

Classics and adaptations

Classics and adaptations

“Recently I watched Emma, the 2020 adaptation of the classic Jane Austen novel. This latest version is so fun and beautifully shot,” said Savage. “The Library recently subscribed to Audio Cine Films, an online database of Hollywood and international feature films. Because I am spending most of my time at home I have had a lot of opportunity to take advantage of this new resource.”

Allan Cho, Research Commons Librarian, suggests a classic in China for almost two decades, Three-Body Problem by author Liu Cixin. “First of the three-book trilogy gained immediate acclaim in 2014 in North America when it was nominated for the Nebula Award for the best works of science fiction or fantasy,” Allan shares.

“C.C. Tsai (Tsai Chih Chung)’s illustrated versions of Chinese classics are always my favorite,” shares Phoebe Chow, Program Services Assistant at the Asian Library. “His wonderful drawings brilliantly capture the spirit of the difficult original text. The Way of Nature collected stories written by Zhuangzi, a pivotal figure in Classical Philosophical Daoism. These thought-provoking stories talk about how human beings live with nature and what the basics of nurturing life are.”

Documentaries

Documentaries graphics

If you’re interested in documentaries, Phoebe has also been spending her time watching Free Solo, a film about the first person to free solo climb Yosemite’s 3,000 feet high El Capitan Wall, and Forever, Chinatown, a James Q. Chan film.

Forever, Chinatown reminds me to cherish the present moment and people around you. The world is ever-changing, but memories can be long-lasting. Sometimes they are even prettier. Highly recommend!” says Phoebe.

Looking for more recommendations? UBC librarians and library staff are here to help.

Recommendations by UBC Librarians

In light of this challenging time, we have compiled recommendations from a handful of UBC librarians for you to watch, read and listen from home. The resources can all be found in UBC Library’s online collections.

National Film Board picks

UBC Library NFB Campus recommendations

UBC Library’s National Film Board (NFB) Campus is a favourite film archive of Evan Thornberry, GIS Librarian at Koerner Library, and Sara Ellis, Art Librarian at the Music, Art and Architecture Library. “One of the most genuinely Canadian films I found was Helicopter Canada,” says Evan, reminiscing about his move to Canada, “For those of you who want to go back in time to 1966 and take a narrated flight across Canada, this is your movie”.

On April 22, Sara celebrated National Canadian Film Day by travelling back in time through a series of short films from NFB Campus. Her favourites include: Begone Dull Care (1949), Neighbours (1952), Lines Horizontal (1962) and Flamenco at 5:15 (1983).

Indigenous literature and film

UBC Library Indigenous literature and film recommendations

Sara Ellis, Art Librarian recommends Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer (2013), “It is just as easy to immerse yourself in chapters on eating wild strawberries and leeks, as it is to read about how lichen grows on rocks or how estuaries can be restored to support the return of wild salmon populations,” she says.

Karleen Lyle-Delaurier, Information Services Librarian at Xwi7xwa Library, is also taking this time to explore Indigenous history through Daniel Heath Justice’s Why Indigenous Literatures Matter. “This book gave me a chance to explore history, identity, place, sexuality, time and so much more through the author’s articulation of how these concepts relate to Indigenous literature,” she says.

Rhymes for young ghouls / Les Films Seville present a Prospector Films production; a Jeff Barnaby Film, is serious as it should be given the topics it touches on, but leaves room for humour and love and I finally get to see an Indigenous female lead,” shares Karleen.

Family-friendly picks

UBC Library family-friendly recommendations

“If you are a Totoro fan, you might enjoy Mirai of the Future, “ says Tomoko Kitayama Yen, Japanese Language Librarian at Asian Library, “The reason why I loved the famous animated film, Our Neighbor Totoro, was I so enjoyed the little girl, Mei. This film features a four-year old boy, and is supposed to have described the child extremely well. I haven’t watched this yet, but I will very soon!”

From outdoor science experiments to infographics of the solar system and picture books, Wendy Traas, Acting head of the Education Library, shares three of her favourite family-bonding resources:

Looking for more recommendations? UBC Librarians are here to help.

Why are online formats important for library users? How does the library identify the needs of our users and acquire e-resources to meet them?

UBC Library has a collection of over 8 million e-resources that are available to the UBC community. Whether you’re on your phone or on your desktop, on campus or out doing field work, the Library ensures that e-resources are available.

Take a sneak peek into our process and learn about why UBC Library’s e-resources collection is increasing and how electronic resources work is constantly changing.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to create and deliver responsive collections.

To learn more about our Strategic Framework, click here.

On Saturday, October 29, our Citation Linker (UBC eLink) and the eJournal Portal was down from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 am and again from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 pm. This impacted some searches in the Library Catalogue and in Summon. Unfortunately, maintenance work led to a longer than expected downtime on October 30 as well.

Please note that Summon and UBC eLink are maintained via a third-party provider external to UBC. 

Our apologies and thanks for your patience. We understand and regret the impact that this interruption had on affected Library users. Please report any issues through the Library’s Electronic Resources help form.

This fall, UBC Library has new resources available to trial for UBC students, faculty, staff, and on-site Library users.

Cambridge Editions

East View – Cambridge Archives Editions

Includes:

These resources are available from September 2 to October 2, 2015. Cambridge Archives Editions represents thousands of original documents of the National Archives (UK) represented in facsimile, including numerous maps, on the national heritage and political development of numerous countries.

Sage Video

Sage Video Collection

Available from September 8 to November 6, 2015, this cross-discipline resource combines originally commissioned material with licensed videos in the areas of Education, Media, Communication and Cultural Studies, and Counseling & Psychotherapy.


 

Feedback on use of these trial resources is strongly encouraged. If additional help is required while using an electronic resource, please contact the subject librarian listed on the resource page.

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British Columbia’s 4.6 million residents now have free perpetual access to the Gale Digital Archive Collections – a database of nearly 200 million pages of digital historical content – as part of a unique agreement arranged by UBC Library, the University of Victoria Libraries and Simon Fraser University Library.

These resources will enrich learning and research in subject disciplines including interdisciplinary studies, Canadian, American, British and World History from 1400-2012, English, Journalism, Political Studies, First Nations Studies, Science Technology and Medicine, Women and Gender Studies, Theatre Studies, and History of Banking and Finance.

“Working with BC Electronic Library Network (BC ELN), local public, academic, school or museum libraries in BC can appreciate and access these resources as much as our faculty and students can at our universities,” notes Ingrid Parent, UBC’s University Librarian. “This is a great example of how shared collaborations with a vendor can have a positive impact on library users.”

Content in the database includes digitized versions of periodicals such as the Economist, the Financial Times, and Associated Press content, as well as digitized materials from The Smithsonian Institution.

A full list of the resources available can be found by visiting the Gale Digital Collections e-catalog.

UBC students, faculty and staff can access and start using these digital historical archives via UBC Library or the Points to the Past website. Members of the public can visit their local library branch to use the collections.

 

List of collections

  • The Economist, 1842-2009
  • Financial Times (Global News), 1888-2009
  • The LISTENER (News & Op/Ed of BBC), 1929-1991
  • Illustrated London News, 1842-2003
  • Picture Post (UK – Similar to LIFE), 1938-1957
  • PUNCH, 1841-1992 (British – Humour / Satire / Commentary)
  • Daily Mail (Conservative Newspaper – London), 1896-2004
  • The Independent (Newspaper – London), 1896-2009
  • The Times (London), 1785-2007
  • The SUNDAY Times, 1821-2006
  • The Times Literary Supplement (TLS), 1902-2008
  • British Library Newspapers, 19th Century I
  • British Library Newspapers, 19th Century II
  • British Newspapers III, 1785-1920
  • British Newspapers IV, 1785-1920
  • 17th & 18th Century Burney Collection of UK Newspapers
  • 19th C. UK Periodicals I: Women’s, Children’s, Humour, Leisure
  • 19th C. UK Periodicals II: Empire/Colonial, Travel, Culture, Missions
  • Liberty Magazine, 1924-1950
  • 19th Century US Newspapers
  • Associated Press 1: News Features & Internal Communications (1848-2000)
  • Associated Press 2: D.C. Bureau Collection (1915-1930, 1952-1996)
  • Associated Press 3: U.S. Cities Bureaus Collection (1931-2004)
  • Eighteenth Century Collection Online (ECCO) I + II
  • The Making of the Modern World I + II, 1450-1930
  • Sabin Americana, History & Culture, 1476-1926
  • Nineteenth Century Collection Online (NCCO), PARTS 1-4
  • Nineteenth Century Collection Online (NCCO), PARTS 5-8
  • Nineteenth Century Collection Online (NCCO), PARTS 9-12
  • CHATHAM HOUSE Online I, 1920-1979
  • CHATHAM HOUSE Online II, 1979-2008
  • State Papers Online I, 1509-1603: Tudor Domestic
  • State Papers Online II, 1509-1603: Tudor Foreign
  • State Papers Online III, 1603-1714: Stuart Domestic
  • State Papers Online IV, 1603-1714: Stuart Foreign
  • State Papers Online, 18th Century I, 1714-1782: Domestic
  • British Literary Manuscripts I, 1660-1900
  • British Literary Manuscripts II, Medieval & Renaissance
  • Indigenous Peoples: North America
  • Smithsonian 1: World’s Fairs and Expositions: Visions of Tomorrow
  • Smithsonian 2: Trade Literature: The Merchandising of Industry
  • Smithsonian (Magazine 1970-2010) + Air & Space (1986-2010)
  • Slavery & Anti-Slavery 1: Debates – Slavery & Abolition
  • Slavery & Anti-Slavery 2: Slave Trade in Atlantic World
  • Slavery & Anti-Slavery 3: Institution of Slavery
  • Slavery & Anti-Slavery 4: Age of Emancipation
  • De-Classified Documents Reference System (DDRS)

 

 

Two new video streaming trial resources are now available for students, faculty and staff.

 

Kanopy Video Streaming will be available until December 6. Kanopy features thousands of videos from producers around the world, with a powerful user interface. Video topics cover a wide range of disciplines, including humanities, arts, business training and K-12 education.

For more details visit the Kanopy resource page.

 

Criterion-on-Demand will be available until December 31, with access to more than 2900 streamed feature films. Titles include everything from new releases and foreign films to 1920s classics. In addition to featuring smaller independent producers, the collection also includes films from Miramax Films, Warner Brothers, Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox.  including classics, new releases, foreign films, literary adaptations, documentaries, animated titles, and independent features.

For more details visit the resource page.

 

As with all resource trials, the Library welcomes feedback. Visit the resource page to find the feedback link.

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