Join the discussion and help shape a National Reading Plan that will encourage, support and promote the joy of reading across Canada.

Have a look at the National Reading Plan DRAFT here.

Click here to view a detailed programme.
 

Register now, SPACE IS LIMITED.

~text and links from the National Reading Campaign website.

Is Our Education System Headed for Success or Failure?

Review the Vancouver Sun’s Education Blog The Report Card for today’s forum of the future of education in British Columbia.

The forum is free: register here.

Guest speakers: 

 

Stranger in a Strange Land 2012: A Children’s Literature Conference Organized by Graduate Students of the University of British Columbia

This is a one-day conference showcasing graduate research that explores and questions any facet of children’s literature.

Presenters are coming from across Canada, with some from the UK, US, and France.

Keynote speakers: Elizabeth Marshall and Sarah Park.

Program schedule here.

There is still time to register!  $18 for students and presenters, and $35 for faculty and professionals, includes morning and afternoon refreshments and a catered lunch. Register here.

The University of British Columbia
Saturday, April 28, 2012
8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (First Floor)
1961 East Mall

The Diversity and Media Toolbox is a comprehensive suite of resources for teachers, students, law enforcement representatives and the general public, that explores issues relating to stereotyping, bias and hate in mainstream media and on the Internet. The program, which includes professional development tutorials, lesson plans, interactive student modules and background articles, is divided into two distinct but complementary topic areas: media portrayals of diversity and online hate.

Teacher’s Resource Catalogue

Trousse Éducative – Diversité et Médias here.

The Diversity and Media Toolbox was produced with the support of the Government of Canada through the Department of Justice Canada’s Justice Partnership and Innovation Program.

~text from the Media Awareness Network website

The Vancouver School Board is has an article on the public opinion’s effect on the future of public education in Vancouver.  Find out more here.

Vancouver School Board Sectoral Review: Our Schools, Our Programs, Our Future pdf here.

Creating Caring Classrooms: How to encourage students to communicate, create, and be compassionate of others

This passionate book is about community, compassion, and creativity; it is about caring for others. It is also about helping students care about their work. Teachers will learn how to establish inclusive classrooms where kindness and concern become crucial backdrops for critical conversations. They will be introduced to simple but profound strategies that initiate and maintain respectful dialogue, promote collaboration over competition, and confront difficult issues such as bullying and exclusion.

Creating Caring Classrooms is committed to building respectful relationships among students, teachers, and the school community. Through active, engaging, relevant, open-ended activities, students will be encouraged to explore events, ideas, themes, texts, stories, and relationships from different perspectives, and then represent those new understandings in innovative and creative ways.

Authors: Kathleen Gould Lundy and Larry Swartz

Publication Date: 2011      ISBN: 9781551382708         Pages: 160

~from the Pembroke Publishers Website

UBC Library Holdings Information here.

Years of failed negotiations offer government solutions, say former union leaders.

If you need proof that history repeats itself, look no further than the contract negotiations between the provincial government and the B.C. Teachers’ Federation.

Since the New Democratic Party government pushed bargaining from the local to provincial level in 1995, there’s only been one successfully negotiated teacher collective agreement.

During that period legislation has been passed, teachers have walked out, fines have been issued, and classes have been cancelled, and when negotiation time rolls around again both sides profess a desire for change, but change doesn’t happen.

The current case is Bill 22: the Education Improvement Act, which introduces a mediator to the equation, but rules any decision must meet the government’s net-zero mandate, which teachers refuse to accept.

Read The Tyee full article here.

By Katie Hyslop, 26March2012, TheTyee.ca

Silent Moments in Education: 

An Autoethnography of Learning, Teaching, and Learning to Teach

by Colette A. Granger

Colette A. Granger’s highly original book considers moments in several areas of education in which silence may serve as both a response to difficulty and a means of working through it. The author, a teacher educator, presents narratives and other textual artefacts from her own experiences of learning and instruction. She analyses them from multiple perspectives to reveal how the qualities of education’s silences can make them at once difficult to observe and challenging to think about.

Silent Moments in Education combines autoethnography with psychoanalytic theory and critical discourse analysis in a unique consideration of the relations teachers and learners forge with knowledge, with ideas, and with one another. This provocative and thoughtful work invites scholars and educators to consider the multiple silences of participants in education, and to respond to them with generosity and compassion.

~from University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division © 2011

UBC Library Catalogue information here

We all feel the need to belong.  The relationships we have built with family, friends and the community provide the roots that shape our character.  Positive attachments with those we care deeply about provide the foundation for our personalities.  When our parents demonstrate how proud they are of our achievements we feel special.  When our best friend runs to greet us we see the caring in their eyes.  When our soccer coach highlights our sportsmanship we strive to achieve even more.  When we have a strong sense of belonging we feel accepted.  All of our children deserve to be treated in this way.  They have a strong desire to be acknowledged as true individuals.

2012-psd-shirt.jpg

Do we always accept individuality?  When a person demonstrates behaviour that is outside established norms do we accept or do we ridicule?  Too often our children do not feel that their individuality is recognized.  They feel isolated and that strong sense of belonging, which they crave, is absent from their lives.  School grounds can sometimes be a place where this individuality is compromised.  Targeted bullying whether it is face to face or behind a screen can have devastating life long effects.  The following story illustrates the power of individuals to change attitudes.

Continue reading here.

by  Scott Wallace  on 2/5/2012 4:59 PM

~from the Gleneagles Elementary School Blog

While conversations are ongoing in BC and around the world focused on innovation that are linked to larger system goals including a  greater focus on personalized learning and giving kids greater ownership of their learning, these are not new objectives. Some practices worth highlighting are not only 21st century, or 20th century learning, in fact, some date back to the 19th century, and are an excellent fit for our current educational directions. At least, this is true of Montessori.

Maria Montessori, who lived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, developed teaching methods which are often described as part of the “21st century learning” phenomena.  When I spend time in our Montessori School, Eagle Harbour Montessori(currently expanding from a K-3 to a K-5 school), I am always in awe of the self-regulation and keen focus these students have.  When I walk into the room, students continue to work and there is a sense of calm and alert focus. Students are owning their learning, the conversations with primary students are very articulate; they talk about what they are doing, why they are doing it, and what they need to learn next.

What I have seen at Eagle Harbour is also supported in the recent book from Shannon Helfrich, Montessori Learning in the 21st Century:  A Guide for Parents and Teachers which links Montessori teachings with the latest neuroscientific findings.

So just what does Montessori look like in our setting:

Principles Include (from the Eagle Harbour Montessori Program 2012):

Continue reading here.

January 10, 2012 by cultureofyes

by Chris Kennedy

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