The Public Knowledge Project at 21: Activism, Scholarship, Security Patches
A Conversation with Professor John Willinsky

Co-hosted by the UBC Library and the UBC iSchool (Library, Archival and Information Studies)

Date/location: July 11, 2019, 2:00-3:30pm (a one-hour talk followed by thirty minutes for informal conversation and refreshments)
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room | UBC Vancouver Campus
Light refreshments will be served.

Register in advance at: http://events.library.ubc.ca/dashboard/view/8066

On or around December 1998, a UBC professor of education inadvertently stepped out of his field of study and into the realm of scholarly communication, having been thrown off course by a glaring contradiction between teaching the young to read – on the promise that it would open worlds for them – and working in an academic system that needlessly cut such readers off from the world of learning in which he worked. His response was to create a Public Knowledge Project that soon attracted the attention, support, and, at one point, the censure of The University of British Columbia Library. Although this talk begins on a personal note, it soon leaps ahead to the current state of scholarly communication. Here, it sets out PKP’s continuing efforts to open that world of learning take the form of building out open infrastructure in the face of corporate lock-in, initiating economic models for universal open access, and proposing copyright reform as an advance over the legal workarounds of open access policies.

BIOGRAPHY:

John Willinsky is Professor in Publishing Studies at SFU, where he directs the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), which conducts research and develops open source scholarly publishing software; he is also Khosla Family Professor of Education and Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at Stanford University. A member of the Royal Society of Canada, his books include the “Empire of Words: The Reign of the OED” (Princeton, 1994); “Learning to Divide the World: Education at Empire’s End” (Minnesota, 1998); “Technologies of Knowing” (Beacon 2000); and “The Access Principle: The Case for Open Access to Research and Scholarship” (MIT Press, 2006).

Part-time position, in partnership with Public Knowledge Project.

In 2016, John Willinsky was honoured with a SSHRC Impact Award for his work with the Public Knowledge Project.

Image courtesy: Simon Fraser University (SFU) Library

 

Last month, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC participated in the yearly Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week event comprised of presentations followed by a discussion about the value of “fair dealing in a modern Canadian context and highlighting the perspectives of diverse copyright stakeholders”.

 

Watch the archived event Balancing the scales: The role of fair dealing in Canada (Parts One, Two, Three and Four)

 

Explore related items in cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository via UBC Library’s Open Collections portal:

 

 

Canadian copyright legislation and archival material

 

The acquisition of literary papers in Canada

 

Building open cultures: the Commons in a digitally networked environment

 

Moral rights of authors in international copyright of the 21st century: time for consolidation?

 

Application of the right of reproduction to the internet: should browsing be considered copyright infringement?

 

Digitally archiving Hula-related objects

 

Developing countries and the international copyright regime: the neglected issue of cultural survival

 

Contested rights in cyberspace

 

UBC Library: Fall update

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Recording of Balancing the scales: The role of fair dealing in Canada now live in UBC’s institutional repository.

The planning committee for the joint SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC Fair Dealing Week event is happy to announce that an archived copy of the talk is now available for viewing in UBC’s institutional repository, cIRcle. Both the panel discussion and Meera Nair’s keynote address are available at the following link:

http://hdl.handle.net/2429/69041

The planning committee would like to thank all who participated virtually and in-person as well as the event sponsors CAUT, UBC, Langara, SFU, Kwantlen, and Douglas for making the event such a success.


The week of March 4th is Open Education Week, an annual celebration of the global Open Education Movement. This year we invite the UBC community to join us and our colleagues from other higher ed institutions from the Lower Mainland at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Richmond campus for a one day “Open in Action” event on March 6th from 8:30-3:15.

More information about the schedule and registration are available on BCcampus’s website.

We hope to see you there.


Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration of the doctrines of fair use and fair dealing — a perfect opportunity to reflect on what is quickly becoming a pivotal period in the history of copyright in Canada. York University has appealed the decision in its case with Access Copyright, the statutory review of the Copyright Act is still underway, and the USMCA free trade agreement promises to extend the term of copyright protection by twenty years. In this climate, building increased awareness about user rights such as fair dealing is more important than ever before.

This Fair Dealing Week, SFU, UBC, Langara, KPU, Douglas, VCC and JIBC invite you to an afternoon of presentations and discussion aimed at demonstrating the value of fair dealing in a modern Canadian context and highlighting the perspectives of diverse copyright stakeholders.

You are also invited to join us for a pub night hosted by the BCLA Academic Libraries Section, to unwind and play Copyright the Card Game.

Details and registration for both events are available here.

 

 

 

Advancing Open is a highly anticipated event happening at the Simon Fraser University (SFU) downtown campus located in Vancouver, British Columbia on May 6th and May 7th, 2019.

 

This upcoming event is being organized by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries’ (CARL) Open Repositories Working Group (and led by its Community-Building and Engagement Task Group).

 

It is an opportunity for all Canadian academic library scholarly communication practitioners and its community to gather, share and exchange ideas about new strategies, methods and resources across a variety of different avenues in order to advance open access and foster open scholarship throughout Canada.

 

Read the full announcement for more details

 

Explore Open Access at UBC

 

Discover Open Scholarship at UBC

 

Learn more about cIRcle, UBC’s Digital Repository

 

 

 

 

 

November 7th featured an event celebrating the launch of Under Creative Construction: A More Just World, an instructional video and the second Open Educational Resource (OER) created with the support of a Library Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant. This grant has allowed the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office to work closely with UBC faculty and partner in the creation of open educational resources.

The video explores the importance of creativity in social and environmental justice movements around the globe. Dr. Farah Shroff talks with prominent local activists Morgane Oger and Dale Edwards about the roles that creativity and art have played in their activism, and the potential they hold in supporting justice movements. The launch was attended by students and members of the community and was simultaneously made open, allowing the work to be shared with the public.

Zachary Foote, a Graduate Academic Assistant with the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office, worked closely with Dr. Farah Shroff in making this project a reality. This has been a great opportunity for library and faculty to explore different kinds of open educational resources, and the creativity that can be brought to their creation. One of the most surprising results of this has been the abundance of media-based projects that faculty are developing for the classroom, along with open textbooks. The creation of the instructional video with Dr. Shroff shows the breadth of paths that OERs can take, and ways that the library can support those efforts.


UBC Library is proud to support International Open Access Week through an exciting series of events happening during the week of October 22-28. Please refer to the Library’s Open Access Week page for information about individual events and how to register.

ScholComm@UBC looks forward to seeing you there!

Recently, the 2018 Open Access Week Advisory Committee revealed the theme for this year’s Open Access Week to be “Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge”.

In the words of the Advisory Committee, “This year’s theme reflects a scholarly system in transition. While governments, funders, universities, publishers, and scholars are increasingly adopting open policies and practices, how these are actually implemented is still in flux. As open becomes the default, all stakeholders must be intentional about designing these new, open systems to ensure that they are inclusive, equitable, and truly serve the needs of a diverse global community. This year’s Open Access Week invites all interested stakeholders to participate in advancing this important work.”

Open Access Week is a great opportunity for the Scholarly Communications Office, the Library, and the greater UBC community to engage in dialogue around open access and foster greater participation in Open Access initiatives happening both on and off campus.

In collaboration with various partners, internally and externally, UBC Library has been celebrating Open Access Week for several years and looks forward to working with this year’s theme to continue the important conversations surrounding Open Access.

If you would like to catch up on last year’s “Exploring Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship” panel, co-sponsored by UBC, SFU, BCIT, and BCcampus, watch the recording, available on the Open UBC website.

Also look to UBC Library’s Open Access page for more information in the Fall.

 

Register Now for the Next Open Scholarship in Practice Day – May 2

Open scholarship, which encompasses open science, open access, open data, open education, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is transforming how knowledge is created and shared.
Join us for a full day of workshops exploring the practice of open scholarship – from new tools that can increase the reproducibility of research, to new pedagogies that become possible when students and faculty become co-creators engaged in generative knowledge creation. Hear from UBC colleagues who are incorporating “openness” in innovative ways to enhance teaching, research, and public impact.
Featured sessions include:

  • hands-on training for tools such as Open Science Framework, GitHub, WeBwork, Pressbooks
  • next steps in Canada’s Tri-Council Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management
  • faculty lightning talks on open education tools and practices at UBC.

Eric Eich, Vice Provost and Associate VP Academic and Jason Pither, Associate Professor of Biology at UBC Okanagan, are among those leading UBC’s efforts towards a more open research culture. “There’s clearly a huge appetite among UBC researchers to learn how to ensure their work is reproducible, transparent, and open. We’re excited about all the initiatives surrounding open scholarship at UBC, and look forward to describing some of these efforts to the UBC community.”

Christina Hendricks, Deputy Academic Director of CTLT adds that open education “activities have the potential to engage students more in what they’re doing, and also thereby help promote deeper learning, since their work will have more lasting and widespread value.”

The event will be held May 2, 9am-4pm at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. All events are free and open to all but registration is required. Lunch and coffee breaks provided. The full program with registration links is available at https://events.ctlt.ubc.ca/events/2018-open-scholarship-in-practice/. Space is limited so register by April 25th.

 

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