Photo credit: Guilhem Vellut @ Flickr

 

In 2002*, UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

 

Back in the day, students mainly studied at study tables with notebooks and pens or pencils. Nowadays, students are studying with the “latest computer technology, a wireless network, peer programs and community events”.

 

 

“We chose to fund the Learning Commons because

we’ve always believed that people learn best when they are engaged in discussion,

sharing ideas and insights with one another.”

Kay and Lloyd Chapman, Benefactors

 

 

Thanks to the benefactors of the CLC, Mrs. Kay Scott Chapman (1917-2012) and Dr. Lloyd Chapman (1918-2004) and Suzanne Cates Dodson (1933 – 2014) and her husband Earl D. Dodson (1928 – 2009) and thanks to the benefactor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Dr. I. K. (Irving) Barber (1923 – 2012), they enabled the UBC community of students, faculty/staff and countless others to enjoy a wide variety of UBC events.

 

Great examples include local and international conferences, lectures and workshops, one-of-a-kind exhibits, special visits from national and international dignitaries to various royal visits over the years.

 

Explore more History of the Chapman Learning Commons

 

Read this article about “how UBC’s work is grounded in student development theory and cuts across traditional unit-based structures to be truly collaborative”

 

Delve into the Digital Tattoo Project and its “focus on supporting learners to make informed choices and extend their digital capabilities around online practices, safety and identity”

 

Peer into how student involvement makes for student success at UBC and beyond

 

Watch a recent video send-off by the CLC student team reflecting on their recent Learning Commons’ experiences!

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Correction on May 20, 2017:

In 2002* (not 2012), UBC`s Chapman Learning Commons (CLC) first opened its doors and, then in 2008, it reopened anew in the finished Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

We’ve had a long, chilly spring, but summer is around the corner! Drop by the Asian Centre (map) during lunch time on Tuesday June 6 and join us for some fun activities.


(12:30-1pm) Cooking instructor Jessica Yu will introduce the traditional HONG KONG STYLE PASTRY! Founder of Jessica Kitchen in Vancouver, Jessica was invited to give cooking demonstration in various community events. With over 10 years of experience, she loves to share the authentic cookery from her hometown.

Happy reading! Learn about our GREAT READS leisure reading collection! This year’s new titles are here already!

Join Japanese Librarian Naoko for an ORIGAMI workshop: create some spring and summer flowers!

Play the Korean board game YUT-NORI with Korean Librarian Lucia! It was popular during our Lunar New Year event in January. Lots of fun!

Visit the new exhibit JAYEOMMI (Natural Beauty) by Ilsoo Kyung! Ilsoo is a multi-media artist who has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions. Her works involve identity and expression, as well as share her ideas of the transitory world.

Asian Centre was officially opened on June 5, 1981. A mini photo exhibit A BIG IDEA will recall the history of building the Asian Centre in 1970s-80s!

The event is free and open to the public.  For more information, please contact Phoebe Chow, Program Services Assistant, at phoebe.chow@ubc.ca.

staff at booth

Thank you to all the UBC students who came to the Library’s annual Chat and Chew Library Love booth last Thursday in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Visitors grabbed snacks and swag to help them with their finals, and dropped in for a pop-up photo booth.

The Library hosts a Library Love booth twice a year to share appreciation for library users of all kinds and to encourage communication about library services and spaces.

Follow our Facebook page to see the album of photos from the event, and be sure to join us for the next Library Love event in the fall!

 staff at booth

Harry Potter at UBC Library

Since its first publication in the U.K. in 1997, the Harry Potter series has garnered international acclaim, and is arguably the most popular children’s literature series in several generations, having joined the ranks of other famous titles such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. In 2015, UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections began acquiring complete sets of first editions of the Harry Potter series. Collecting and preserving copies of the Harry Potter books ensures that scarce first and special editions of these titles will be available to Canadians for generations to come.

A new exhibit at Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

In tandem with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra’s screening and performance of Harry Potter and the Chamber of SecretsTM, Rare Books and Special Collections is exhibiting some of the unique and remarkable Harry Potter books in its collection. This exhibit is the second of its kind, the first took place in 2016 in tandem with VSO’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s StoneTM. Unique to the exhibit in 2017 is the addition of several antiquarian books from UBC Library’s William C. Gibson History of Medicine and Science Collection. These titles feature beautiful wood block and etching prints of magical creatures including unicorns, dragons and basilisks—providing insight into the types of fascinating source materials author J.K. Rowling may have used to create her magical universe.

 

Depictions of dragons in UBC Library’s William C. Gibson History of Medicine and Science Collection

Depictions of unicorns in UBC Library’s William C. Gibson History of Medicine and Science Collection

 

Explore Harry Potter at UBC Library
VSO event details

Attend a tour of Rare Books and Special Collections

Join a weekly tour of the Rare Books and Special Collections department every Wednesday from 11 a.m.–12 p.m. Experience an introduction to our space and our unique materials and collections, including items from the Harry Potter collection. Tours are free and open to the general public.

Find tour details

 

Open Education Week is a celebration of the global Open Education Movement. Its goal is to raise awareness about the movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide. Attend one of the many Open Education events at UBC and UBC Library throughout March. 

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thons    

Date & Location: March 18 at the Belkin Art Gallery

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Date & Location: March 19 at the Western Front Society

Time: 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Sign up to participate.

 

Open Scholarly Practice

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning.

Date & Location: March 27, Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Time: 12 to 1:30 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

 Join us to explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. We’ll tackle such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Date & Location: March 28, Harbour Centre, Simon Fraser University, Room 1430

Time: 5:30 to 8 :45 p.m.

Register for the event.

 

[citation needed] – Librarians Improving Wikipedia

Date & Location: March 30, Terrace Lounge, iSchool, 4th Floor IKBLC

12:30 to 2:00 p.m.

Join us in celebration of Open Education Week for “Librarians Improving Wikipedia.” For an hour we will work together to add reliable citations to Wikipedia articles. Come for as long as you can. Light snacks will be available.

Register for the event.

 

If you’re a fan of children’s books, you won’t want to miss From Apple Pies to Astronauts, A Chronology of Alphabet Books with Aphorisms, Amusements, and Anecdotes! at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections. The exhibit offers a selection of English language alphabet books from the late 18th century to the present day. These books illustrate the changes in alphabetic education for young children in England, the United States, and Canada. The exhibition is curated by UBC Master of Library and Information Studies candidates Sarah Bagshaw and Laura Quintana, under the supervision of Professor Kathie Shoemaker.  We chatted with Laura and Sarah about their curation process.

What inspired you to create an exhibit around Alphabet Books? 

Sarah:  The books themselves were the inspiration.  Once Kathie Shoemaker suggested the idea, I got to search for alphabet books in the Rare Books and Special Collection catalogue.  Then I got to go and look at them and was amazed by all the different styles through time, all the differences and similarities to alphabet books now.  In discussing what I was looking at with my husband, he suggested displaying them in chronological order as well as going through the alphabet from A to Z.  This turned out to be an excellent way to showcase the books and the changes in illustration, the way they were written, and their educational purpose over time.

Laura: It was Sarah’s idea, actually. I got into the project in a later stage and helped her with everything I could. I have to say that I found the project really interesting. I did not grow up with Alphabet books and during our research we found out that in countries with languages other than English it is not as common as it is here to use alphabet books as an introduction to literacy.

What intrigues you about children’s books? 

Sarah: Children’s books are amazing.  There are so many wonderful books being published for children today.  Picture books are particularly fascinating as they tell stories with both text and pictures.  The types and styles of illustration we see now in picture books is incredible.  They are a window into the cultural context of the time period they come from as well as an entertainment piece for both adults and children.  Picture books are not easy to create.  They have to tell a story well and the text cannot fall down on the job – it has to work being read out loud.  Current writers could take a page or two from the writers of the past!  The rhyming text in the old alphabet books in the exhibit was a joy to read.

Laura: There is a common misconception that understands children’s literature as a second class kind of literature, as if authors and publishers were lowering their scales to produce books that appeal to children but are not good enough to engage adults. And it often happens that adults who read children’s literature are seen as infantile. Children’s literature has a specific audience, and that audience is the most demanding and honest of all. Authors need to really address a particular need and satisfy very high expectations. Children know what is good and what is not, and they won’t read a book that does not give them what they are asking for. Another important think to highlight is that children are still able to see the marvels of the world. Children’s books authors need to honor the splendour of that point of view and produce books that fully satisfy the children’s need for beauty, and that is not an easy thing to do. Alphabet books address a learning expectation, but they also appeal to children through illustrations, text, reading rhythm and originality. They are a learning tool and also a source for enjoyment. Alphabet books these days can be simply amazing.

How did the two of you come to work on this project?   

Sarah: Kathie Shoemaker approached me last summer while I was taking her Illustrated Materials for Children course about possibly putting together an exhibit of alphabet books in the Rare Books reading room.  This sounded like such a cool idea!  Everyone in the West who speaks English is familiar with alphabet books, we all grew up with them and there are so many different kinds.  To be able to look at old alphabet books as well as find beautifully illustrated new ones was so much fun. 

Laura: Sarah had already created the concept, and her enthusiasm and passion was contagious.

 

How did you select the books displayed in the exhibit? 

Sarah: Once we had the idea for a chronological tour, we selected books that best represented different eras or decades in the development of early childhood learning and alphabet books.  Some of the more recent alphabet books are very well known, but we felt that they should be included as they represented either specific ideas about children and learning, or a change in illustrative style.  Everyone knows Dr. Seuss, so did we need to have him in this exhibit?  Yes!!  He represents a big shift in the thinking about children, learning, and books.  Each book has a reason for being in the cases even if we didn’t create a lengthy item label for it. We were really lucky that Kathie has an extensive library of alphabet books to choose from and I also asked friends and family to search their libraries.

 Laura: We looked for the most appealing materials, and also for the ones that best represented a particular moment in time and in the evolution of Alphabet books.

Do you have a favourite alphabet book? 

Sarah: That’s hard.  There are certain books that have a nostalgia for me, like Cecily Mary Barker’s Flower Fairy Alphabet because I grew up with it, as well as Dr. Seuss.  Chicka Chicka Boom Boom  because we read that to our daughter and the rhythm in it is so spot on.  However, now that I have seen all these old alphabet books, I find the Battledoor fascinating for what it is and for showcasing street vendors from the early 19th century.  Wanda Gag’s ABC Bunny is such a good example of picture and text working together to tell a story.  The old alphabet books I got the most excited about are the ones illustrated by Walter Crane, who was part of the Arts and Crafts movement.  He worked with William Morris.  So many interesting things to read about him and his art!

 Laura: I fell in love with several of them, but if I have to choose it would be Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, with all its rhythm and freshness. I also love The Neverending Story since I was young, and until now I have never thought about the fact that it was written as an alphabet book, with chapters that start with a letter of the alphabet, in order. I found that very interesting.

What was your favourite children’s book as a child? 

Sarah: Another hard question!  My family is British and so I grew up with books from England.  I still have the copy my Granny sent me of Enid Blyton’s Magic Faraway Tree.  I blame this book for my love of fantasy and my fascination with doorways to other places.  I also have a soft spot for Wind in the Willows, original Winnie the Pooh, and A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson.  I pinched the family copy of The Real Mother Goose illustrated by Blanch Fisher Wright to use with our daughter and love looking into the history of weird and obscure nursery rhymes.  Clearly the rhyming and rhythm of text read out loud is important to me!

Laura: My favourite book as a child was Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens. I’m still in love with this concept of Peter Pan as a newborn child who can fly, who used to have wings and is able to fly because he does not know that that is impossible. In this book he does not need fairy dust or the help of Tinker Bell to be able to flyI felt so sad when I first read it: to think about a child who flies away from his mother and finds out later, when he wants to come back, that the windows have been barred and that his mother has a new baby that has taken his place. I think that it is a wonderful book with an extraordinary, powerful and heartwarming main character.

From Apple Pies to Astronauts is on display at UBC Library’s Rare Books and Special Collections on the first floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre from February 27 through April 30, 2017, and can be viewed Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 12-5 p.m. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and people of all ages are encouraged to attend. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

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