From “In Powder and Crinoline” (PZ7.3.A1 Q85 In 1913)

I hope you are all staying safe and well! Even though the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is currently closed, we’re excited to share through our blog the delightful results of a student assignment undertaken during the winter 2020 term for the English course “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image.”

For this assignment, Professor Pamela Dalziel asked her students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “The Little Witch of the Plain” (PZ6 1897 .S537)

So far we have nine assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time over the coming weeks. Be sure to read all of the fairy tale assignments kindly shared by Professor Dalziel’s students.

We hope you enjoy these fairy tale selections and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of the books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part II:

 

From “The Exceptional Tadpole” (PZ6 1897 .S537)

I hope you are all staying healthy and well today! While the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room is closed, we will unfortunately not be able to host some of the classes that we had scheduled to visit in the last few weeks of the winter 2020 term. We love hosting classes, as it allows us to introduce that many more students to our amazing collections. And it’s wonderful to see the interesting materials, some of which are new even to us, that professors select for the classes. But we especially love to see the results of the students’ work with our collections and the incredible insights they bring to their topics. Since we’re not open physically, we’re very happy to share some of this great student work with you virtually!

One of the assignments for Professor Pamela Dalziel’s winter 2020 course, “The Victorian Fairy Tale: Text and Image,” was a delightful project asking students to “choose five illustrated Victorian fairy tales available in Rare Books and Special Collections that you would like to have in your personal collection.” Some of Professor Dalziel’s students were kind enough to share their final selections with not only the team at RBSC, but also with the public through our blog.

From “The Old Woman who Lost her Dumpling” (PZ6 1898 H427)

So far we have seven assignments that students have been willing to share, some anonymously and some with author credit. I’ll post links to the final assignments a few at a time throughout the week. We hope you enjoy them and will perhaps be inspired to stop by RBSC to see some of these books for yourself once the RBSC reading room has reopened.

Five fairy tale selections, part I:

 

 

The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks is a chronological look at the evolution of the picturebook, one of the important literary art forms to emerge from the 20th Century. This exhibit is on display in IKBLC on the Level 2 foyer from March 4 through May 30, 2020.

The Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection, one of our most well-known and beloved special collections, contains material related to three broad and interrelated themes: early British Columbia history, immigration and settlement and the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The collection contains a wide variety of documents, photographs, books, artifacts and maps related to each of these themes.

Selections from the collection are on display in RBSC, organized to show some of the most compelling stories of Canada’s past.

Early B.C. history:

Related to early B.C. history are rare editions of the narratives of many Pacific voyages of discovery including Valdes, Galiano, Malaspina, Cook and Vancouver. The exhibition also features charts recording the exploration of the Pacific Northwest.

Immigration and settlement:

The Fraser River gold rush that sparked Chinese immigration to British Columbia is highlighted through books and government documents relating to the restriction of such immigration. Chinese-Canadian cultural, social and economic life is displayed through archival documents, photographs and artifacts.

European immigration to Canada is illustrated with promotional brochures and posters encouraging settlers to the West, and archival material from the Clandonald colony in Alberta, a community of immigrants from the Scottish Hebrides.

Canadian Pacific Railway:

Documents, maps and publications show how the Canadian Pacific Railway was built, and how Vancouver was chosen as the western terminus. Photographs and accounts of the building of the railway are presented, along with vibrant posters promoting travel and tourism via C.P.R. rail and steamships. Beautiful examples of cruise ship memorabilia provide a glimpse of the style of the times.

RBSC offers a drop-in tour of the Chung Collection room every Thursday at 10 a.m. The exhibition is also open to the public, free of charge during Rare Books and Special Collections opening hours (Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.). We hope to welcome you for a visit soon!

 

With the closure of UBC Library due to the quickly evolving situation with COVID-19, we apologize that this wonderful exhibition will not be open to the public in the coming weeks. Please enjoy these photos of the exhibition, which were taken by the talented student curators. A complete catalogue of the exhibition can be downloaded here.


Rare Books and Special Collections at UBC Library is delighted to announce a new exhibition: The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks.

Many thanks to guest bloggers Logaine Navasques, Maureen Duteau, Jacqueline Noel, and Jordyn Zirk for contributing the below post! Logaine and Maureen, graduate students in the Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program, and Jacqueline and Jordyn, graduate students at the UBC School of Information, curated this magical new exhibition under the supervision of Dr. Kathryn Shoemaker, Adjunct Professor with the UBC School of Information.

The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks is a chronological look at the evolution of the picturebook, one of the important literary art forms to emerge from the 20th Century. The exhibit features ground breaking, innovative books such as Millions of Cats, Madeline, Where the Wild Things Are,  The Very Hungry Caterpillar, I Want My Hat Back and other brilliant picturebooks responsible for forging a literary art form that reflects the culture of its time and is becoming a vital form in promoting visual and print literacy for all ages.  

The literary picturebook is a new literary art form that emerges in the 20th century, evolving from the  illustrated children’s book. It evolves concurrently with two other relatively new visual sequential narrative forms, comic/graphic novels and animated films. The three forms influence each other as they develop principally because so many of the creators worked in all three forms. This exhibit highlights key books in this evolution revealing how each changed the nature and content of the picturebook form.

The Wild Ride: In and Out of Years and Over a Century of Picturebooks is on display from March 4 through May 30, 2020. The exhibition is free and open to the public, and people of all ages are encouraged to attend. A complete catalogue of the exhibition can be downloaded here. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

 

 

The exhibit runs until February 28 on Level 2 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre.

Past Purrrrfect: Cats in the Collection 

(special supplemental exhibit

In the Doghouse: Historic Hounds)

Rare Books and Special Collections

Jan. 6 — Feb. 29, 2020

“Time spent with a cat is never wasted” – Colette

Have you heard the mews?! Libraries and archives have always been home to our feline friends, and Rare Books and Special Collections at the UBC Library is no exception. We don’t have a resident kitty patrolling our reference room, vault or stacks, but we do have numerous cats “living” in our collections. Proving our predecessors were just as obsessed with collecting cat related archival and rare published materials as we are, Past Purrrfect highlights materials from the 19th to the mid-20th centuries featuring a bevy of furry felines. In this exhibit you will find kitties playing, sleeping, prancing, purring, and being naughty. From our diverse holdings, items on exhibit range from photographs and family albums, children’s literature, correspondence from noteworthy individuals, pop-up books, bookplates, and artist editions.

Archival Materials

Our archival records are broad in scope, and include correspondence from well-known historical figures, as well as celebrated authors. RBSC hold 89 letters written by Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, with many focused on cats. She writes about her own pet Mr. Muff, and about finding homes for them among her correspondents. Writing to her friend Mary Mohl on January 20th, 1877, Nightingale writes:

Dearest Madame Mohl This is solely about cats: The Tom kitten with a ‘pretty face’, which you said you would like (your own descendant) when you were here has been scrupulously set apart for you. He has now, I think, the longest hair I ever saw: is most affectionate & very clean: I was in hopes that you would have let me know any opportunity by which he could have been sent to you at Paris: (as you did not summon him to go by with yourself). Could you let me know whether you still wish to have him: his name is Biz: & whether there will soon be a safe opportunity of someone going to Paris who would carefully take him to you: I should think he would be greatly admired even in Paris: {If he stops here, he {will be stolen or lost: dearest friend, no more to-day: ever your old Flo.

Other letters referencing cats are written by Malcolm Lowry, Ethel Wison, and Charles Darwin. Lowry, best known for his novel Under the Volcano, elaborated in a postscript in a June 20, 1950 letter to fellow author Christopher Isherwood, about issues with some troublesome felines:

P.S. I begun to write this letter originally, returning the complement (which I appreciate) in my own handwriting, such as it is — though I have no pen that works — taking advantage of this to write outside. But a cat spilt coconut oil on it. Then another cat spilt beer on it. Finally it blew into the sea, Retrieved thence it came somewhat to pieces and was, besides, a bit illegible. So I gave in, temporarily, to the machine age.

Originals of the above correspondence, along with letters by Darwin and Wilson on a feline theme, are on display as part of the Past Purrrfect exhibit.

Also in the exhibit, are photographs of cats selected from the Uno Langmann Collection of BC photographs, Wallace and Madeleine Chung Collection, Icelandic Archives of British Columbia, and other photographic holdings. These images show that from the early days of photography cats have been worthy subjects to record for posterity, either captured on their own, or with their human companions. These images also demonstrate that cats are integral and loved members of the families who give them shelter, whether that is a comfortable home or somewhere less traditional.

Books

Past Purrrfect contains volumes from our book collections, including examples from our vast children’s literature holdings and the Alice 100 collection celebrating 100 years since the original publication of Alice in Wonderland in 1865. The collection was donated to the UBC Library in 1965 by the graduating class of 1925 to mark their 40th anniversary, and contains numerous variations of the iconic Cheshire Cat among its illustrations. Also shown are classic stories such as Puss in Boots and the Tale of Tom Kitten, along with lost favourites that are deserving of renewed interest. One discovery in researching this exhibit is the Cats Tea Party. Listed in our catalogue without any attributions, research revealed that its illustrator is Harrison Weir. Weir was a prolific author and illustrator active in the late 19th Century known for his books about nature, and particularly for his drawings of cats. Weir is also referred to as the “Father of the Cat Fancy” and organized the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London in 1871.

The Cats Tea Party Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Croquet

A cat capturing a croquet ball, 1926, by Louis Wane. Arkley_25_0009.

The Tremaine Arkley Croquet Collection consists of over 2,400 items depicting the game of croquet (and earlier pastimes of its type) from the 18th century to the present. Within the collection are numerous examples of animals enjoying this most Victorian of pursuits, particularly cats whose cunning sportsmanship is exceptionally suited to the game. Included in the exhibit are drawings by Louis Wane (1860-1939) one of the better-known illustrators of children’s fiction featuring cats. Wane produced numerous books and hundreds of illustrations starring large-eyed anthropomorphic cats and kittens.   Other items on display show less refined creatures (dogs) disrupting play and causing havoc.

In the Doghouse: Historic Hounds

Running concurrently with Past Purrrfect, we have devoted space for those who may be more partial to dogs, as we don’t want lovers of canines to feel left out. In the Doghouse: Historic Hounds is curated by iSchool graduate student (and RBSC Archival Assistant) James Goldie. In James’ words:

Humans and dogs have evolved alongside each other for millennia, so why should cats get all the glory here at RBSC? Many dog-related phrases and idioms have negative connotations (“dogs days,” “dog-eat-dog world,” and “sick as a dog” to name just a few), however, this part of our exhibition seeks to reclaim the notion of being in the doghouse. Here you’ll find materials celebrating our tail-wagging, four-legged friends. Though today we live in an age of doggy daycare and paw-sized winter boots, affection for dogs (and the central role they’ve played in our lives and imaginations) has changed very little in the last 150 years. Purebreds and mongrels alike are featured throughout our collection, as evidenced by this sampling of photographs, books, correspondence, and more — a veritable dog’s breakfast of archival resources we hope will delight you as only these special animals can.

Scholarly Purr-suits: cats and dogs in the library

In addition to Past Purrrfect and In the Doghouse at Rare Books and Special Collections, please also enjoy the following feline and canine themed exhibits at other branches of the UBC Library:

David Lam Library and Canaccord Learning Commons

Friends from another Species: the Business of Pets

January 13- February 14, 2020

The David Lam Library and Canaccord Learning Commons’ part in the exhibit will include highlighting aspects of the print and electronic collection, as well as search strategies that help people find information on pets and the pet related industries. This includes market research resources like Passport GMID and IBISworld, as well as resources on influencer marketing and social commerce. Engagement activities include a photo wall of a variety of pets that have captured the hearts of many through various social channels.

Curators: Irena Trebic, Kim Fama, Christina Sylka

 

Education Library

The Truth About Cats & Dogs: Children’s Books About the World’s Most Popular Pets

January 6 – 20, 2020

This exhibit will feature fiction and non-fiction children’s books about cats and dogs.  From well-loved classics like Old Yeller by Fred Gipson to newer graphic novels like Fluffy Strikes Back by Ashley Spires, library patrons and pet lovers of all ages will find something of interest.

Curators: Jennifer Abel, Carmen Marchal, Stephanie Marston, Elena Pederson

Specific location: Collection Spotlight area (Main Level of UBC Education Library)

 

Koerner Library

It’s Reading Cats and Dogs

February 1 – 28, 2020

It’s Reading Cats and Dogs will explore the literary, historical, and cultural obsession with our canine and feline companions through a selection of materials from Koerner Library’s holdings. The display will also highlight the cats and dogs of Koerner Library staff, with photos as well as book recommendations paw-sonally approved by our furry friends.

Curators: Keith Bunnell and Alexandra Alisauskas

Specific location: Koerner Library, Fireplace

 

Woodward Library

Wild Observations: Felidae and Canidae around the World

January 6 – February 28, 2020

A selection of books highlighting the fossil history, genetics, and conservation of wild cats and dogs from Woodward Library’s collection.

Curators: Sarah Parker and Chantal Lyons-Stevenson

Specific Location: Woodward Library, Memorial Room

 

All of our cats and dogs will delight and amuse you!

Acknowledgements

A special thank you to exhibit sponsor, Vancouver Orphan Kitten Rescue Association (VOKRA).

Additional thanks to exhibit supporter Catfe for providing a Nine Lives Card (9 visit admission card) for raffle. Enter at the front desk of Rare Books and Special Collections. The winner will be drawn at the end of the closing day of the exhibit, February 28th.

Both VOKRA and Catfe, among other animal rescue organizations in the lower mainland, provide a valuable community service in assisting with caring for, and finding forever homes for the many cats in their custody. If considering a pet there are many wonderful rescue animals waiting for homes.

Please adopt, don’t shop!

Thank you also to Library staff and friends who helped make this exhibit possible: Jacky Lai (invaluable curatorial assistance and exhibit support), James Goldie (Curator of Dogs), Barbara Towell, Anne Lama, Hannah McKendry, Chelsea Shriver, Weiyan Yan, Hiller Goodspeed, Claire Williams, Felicia de la Parra, Matt Patton, Michelle Blackwell, Elissa Wong, Kristy Woodcock, and Katherine Kalsbeek.

– Krisztina Laszlo, Curator of Cats and RBSC Archivist

 

Past Purrrfect, which is free and open to the public, will be on display in the Rare Books and Special Collections reading room. The RBSC reading room is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

Visit the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre on Wednesday, January 8th to meet John Fluevog.

As part of the exhibition “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” Canadian shoe designer and Fluevog’s founder John Fluevog will be at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre to view the exhibit and meet with the Library and campus community. Copies of John Fluevog’s new book will be available for purchase.

Learn more about the exhibit

Date: Wednesday, January 8, 2020
Time: 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2

 

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to engage with communities.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

“Life’s too short to wear boring shoes.” — John Fluevog

The David Lam Management Research Library and Canaccord Learning Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library are pleased to present “50 Years of Sole: A History of Fluevog: Honouring a Vancouver Icon,” which is on display in David Lam Library from November 20 to December 24, 2019 and continues in the New Year in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre through January 13, 2020.

The exhibition coincides with the 50th anniversary of Vancouver-based John Fluevog Shoes, and the publication of a new book, Fluevog: 50 Years of Unique Soles for Unique Souls. John Fluevog is a celebrated Canadian shoe designer known for his witty and unconventional style, as well as the uplifting messages that he includes on every pair of shoes. His designs are among the most distinctive footwear of the last fifty years.

Darren Dahl, Senior Associate Dean, Faculty at the UBC Sauder School of Business, Director of the Robert H. Lee Graduate School and Professor in the Marketing and Behavioural Sciences Division, attests to Fluevog’s significance as both a business and a cultural treasure, affirming that “Fluevog put Vancouver on the map for innovative and progressive shoe design.”

John Fluevog’s work in shoe design and business has been a winding journey with ups and downs. His career began in Gastown, where the Vancouver flagship store is located today, when Fluevog partnered with Peter Fox in 1970. The partnership, known as Fox and Fluevog, lasted a decade and saw the opening of multiple stores before an amicable split. The split marked the birth of “John Fluevog Shoes” with more store openings in Seattle, Boston, and Toronto. Fluevogs broke into the mainstream in the 1990s when they were worn by both Madonna in the film Truth or Dare and by Lady Miss Kier from the band Deee-lite. To keep up with demand, John opened up stores in New York, San Francisco, and Chicago. Today, Fluevog has 27 stores in the United States, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia. Throughout his career, Fluevog has woven his love of cars, his focus on community and culture, and design and sustainability into his craft and stores.

The Mini Gorgeous is UBC Library’s favourite Fluevog shoe, as voted on by Library personnel in an online poll.

The exhibition hosted within the David Lam Library and Canaccord Learning Commons highlights how John Fluevog has successfully built a business, a brand, and a community over the course of 50 years. Just as Fluevog values its customers as collaborators, locating the display in a vibrant, learner-centred space allows students to experience directly Fluevog’s collaborative, creative, and inspiring approach to business.

The display on level 2 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre also features original multimedia illustrations from Vancouver artist Robert Chaplin’s The Elves & the Shoemaker, featuring charming and helpful elves making and wearing Fluevog shoes. The book is a delightfully illustrated adaptation of the Brothers Grimm original tale, inspired by the soul and soles of Fluevog shoes.

Complimenting the displays in the David Lam Library and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, the Walter C. Koerner Library will host a book display starting on December 1 that delves into the “sole” of Fluevog, bringing together materials on the subjects of footwear, fashion, celebrity, subculture, and Vancouver history that influenced and were influenced by John Fluevog. The display will also feature interactive de-stressing activities that tap into Fluevog’s creativity and playfulness.

Drop-in tours of the exhibition at the David Lam Library and Canaccord Learning Commons will be offered on the following dates:

November 26: 12:00-12:30pm and 12:30-1:00pm
November 28: 12:00-12:30pm and 12:30-1:00pm

We are pleased to announce these tours during Global Entrepreneurship Week, and we will feature subsequent posts featuring short interviews with UBC Fluevloggers on UBC Library’s Small Business Accelerator: sba.ubc.ca.

We are also delighted to host John Fluevog for a meet and greet and book signing on Wednesday, January 8, from 12:30-2pm in the foyer of UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, level 2. Join us for this opportunity to meet John Fluevog in person, congratulate him on 50 years in the business, talk shoes, and ask him to sign your copy of: Fluevog: 50 years of Unique Soles for Unique Souls. (Copies will also be available for purchase.) The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at (604) 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

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