The Rainbow Ranche Collection was donated to the Lake Country Museum and Archives by the family of James Goldie.

James Goldie (1877-1971) was an owner and resident manager of Rainbow Ranche. Goldie was very engaged in the fruit industry, promoting the concept of central selling. For several years, he was part of the board for the Vernon Fruit Union, the B.C. Fruit Growers Association, B.C. Tree Fruits and the Winfield Okanagan Centre Irrigation District.

As one of the first independent fruit ranches in the Okanagan, Rainbow Ranche played an important role in the community. Before ending up in the hands of James Goldie, J. E. McAllister, and Robert Stanhope Dormer, who were partners for almost forty years, the Rainbow Ranche had a few different owners. But it was the first owners, the Barr Brothers, who named Rainbow Ranche in homage of the frequent rainbows that would appear on their land.

Correspondence and ledgers make up the majority of the Rainbow Ranche Collection, in which it is possible to see details from the first planting and other orchard operations. This collection also provides an idea of how work and life were in Okanagan in the early 1900s.

Take a look at some of the materials from the Rainbow Ranche Collection:

Advertisement for “Canada Empire Apples” from the Associated Growers of B.C.


Letter to “Sirs” [J.E. McAllister and Robert Stanhope Dormer] from[James Goldie], March 21, 1931

Newspaper Clipping from The Globe, August 01, [1913]

Inventory [of Rainbow Ranche] taken January 1938

Map of Lots on Barnard Ave. and Tronson Street, [1911]

Have these images got you interested? If so, check out more items in the Rainbow Ranche Collection.


James Goldie obituary, June 1971 (UBC Open Collections)

The history of Rainbow Ranche (Lake Country Museum and Archives)

The Rainbow Ranche Collection (Lake Country Museum and Archives)

The Rainbow Ranche Collection (UBC Open Collections)

International Students’ Day is celebrated annually on November 17. It is a day of both commemoration and celebration: a chance to recognize the 1939 Nazi German storming of Czech universities and the resulting arrests and deaths of hundreds of students; and a chance to celebrate and support the continued activism of student communities around the world today.

Here at the Digitization Centre, we’ve decided to feature some of our collection items which highlight student activism at UBC over the course of the last several decades. Student protests, sit-ins and other forms of activism give voice to the needs and rights of UBC’s student body, and have, at times,  led to widespread and progressive institutional change.

Perhaps the earliest student protest at UBC was known as the Great Trek, when nearly 1,200 students marched from downtown Vancouver to the unfinished Point Grey campus to protest government inaction on construction of the new university. To learn more about the Great Trek, check out this article from The Ubyssey.


Great Trek at Georgia and Granville streets, 1922

In 1968, due to overcrowding on-campus and a perceived lack of long-term vision for higher education in the province, over 1,000 students staged a massive sit-in to “liberate” UBC’s Faculty Club. The atmosphere of resistance and unrest coincided with a visit by American activist Jerry Rubin, and was no doubt informed by the radical activism taking place on university campuses across the border in the United States. As a result of the sit-in, a campus-wide day of reflection took place in order to address student concerns, and student involvement in the University’s governing bodies increased. For more information on this interesting period in the University’s history, click here and here.


Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968


Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968


Student sit-in at Faculty Club, 1968


The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968


The Ubyssey, October 25, 1968

Other forms of action and activism have taken place at UBC campus in the intervening years, and we will undoubtedly see more such events in the future.


School of Architecture paint-in, 1974


Student Robin Wiley speaking at tuition fee increase protest, 1995


Point Grey beach erosion protestors prevent start of erosion control project, 1974


Students sitting on floor of Administration building, ca. 1970

A number of our smaller collections here at UBC Library contain truly interesting and unique content that provides insightful historical perspective on early British Columbian history. Today we’re highlighting one such example: the Archibald Murchie Collection is made up of more than 50 photographs taken in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s by “B.C.’s Evangelist photographer”.


Yale, B.C., ca. 1900


Ten horse team skidding logs, between 1890 and 1910

These photographs feature imagery from the Cariboo and Similkameen regions of the province, highlighting the infrastructure projects and development in these areas by early settlers. Bridge, dam and railroad construction projects figure prominently, as do landscape shots of the growing cities, scenes of crews at work, and local First Nations peoples.


Lytton, B.C., between 1890 and 1910


First Nations family outside their home in Chilliwack, B.C., between 1890 and 1910


First wheelbarrow in Cariboo, B.C., between 1890 and 1910

Archibald Murchie (1852-1930) was a Scottish immigrant and evangelist minister for the Spiritualist Church, an off-shoot of the Church of England. In the late 1800’s he decided to preach as a missionary in B.C.’s interior, and around the same time was hired to photograph the construction of a bridge over the Fraser River at Sheep Creek. As construction proved to be fairly slow, Murchie took the opportunity to travel to surrounding regions and photograph the growing towns and cities that were sprouting up. After a failed attempt at leading his own parish in Princeton, B.C., Murchie set up a photography studio in Ashcroft, B.C., eventually marrying and relocating to the Okanagan Valley.


Bridge construction in progress at Sheep Creek on the Fraser River, between 1890 and 1900


Stagecoach at 100 Mile House, B.C., between 1890 and 1910


First Nations men and women on riverbank, between 1890 and 1910

At his death in 1930, Murchie’s widow remarried and destroyed all of his photographic equipment. It was only by chance that, in 1948, several glass plate negatives were recovered from a chicken house under repair. Another interesting fact: Archibald’s brother was the founder of the now well-known local company, Murchie’s Tea & Coffee.


Man with dogs in snowy forest, between 1890 and 1910


Princeton, B.C., between 1890 and 1910


Men loading bobsled with logs near Westbank, B.C., ca. 1910

This collection is housed at UBC Okanagan Library’s Special Collections and Archives, and is a part of the Doug and Joyce Cox Research Collection. To view more images from the Archibald Murchie collection, click here!

The Japanese community has had a long history in British Columbia, beginning with the first Japanese person to land on the coast in 1877, a sailor named Manzo Nagano. For the next 70+ years, members of the Japanese community in the province achieved great success while also facing ongoing prejudice and racism, as early settlers in B.C. struggled to accept these new immigrants.

In 1907, Anti-Oriental riots shook various coastal cities along the Pacific, including Vancouver. Pervasive racism, intolerance and economic instability led to extensive damage to Asian-owned properties throughout the city, and prompted the Japanese government to stop emigration of its nationals to Canada.


Building on Powell St. damaged during 1907 race riots, Vancouver

In February of 1942, in reaction to the events at Pearl Harbor, Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King issued a decree to evacuate all Japanese Canadians to “protective areas”, also known as internment camps. Men, women and children, many of whom were themselves born and raised in British Columbia, were relocated to the camps, and much of their property confiscated by the provincial government.


Truck transporting Japanese Canadian men to Tashme camp


Japanese Canadians being processed in Slocan


Group photograph at Slocan camp


Two men at internment camp , perhaps in Angler, ON.


Group of children at Lemon Creek camp


Group of Japanese Canadian girls participating in Bon-Odori (summer festival) at Greenwood camp

This collection documents these events while offering insight into the everyday lives of Japanese Canadians living in British Columbia throughout the 20th century. To learn more about this important collection, click here.



Shigetaka Sasaki family


Mrs. Shigejiro Edamura in front of an unidentified store


Mrs. Ume Niwatsukino with children Hisako, Hiroshi and Shigeru in Steveston, 1926

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