Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC iSchool. In the post-print information era, how do libraries manage scholarly information? Academic libraries have developed alongside technology, but technology is now changing the structures of information creation, dissemination, retrieval, and preservation. The use of technology in and by libraries, and by the scholars whom they serve, has raised new questions for librarians about their work and its place within the academy.

This presentation explores how forces and critical issues that are now shaping academic libraries are deepening their engagement with scholars and helping to build platforms and relationships that expand the pathways of creation, discovery, learning, and dialogue. We will consider several of these phenomena and how they may contribute to expanded roles for libraries and a new era of library work.

Speaker Bio

Susan E. Parker was appointed University Librarian at the University of British Columbia starting on September 1, 2017. She was previously the Deputy University Librarian at UCLA from 2005 until mid-2017, where she had a broad administrative and operations portfolio that included budget and fiscal planning, space planning and renovation, assessment, programming, and various user services. From 2015-2017, she served as interim Director of Library Special Collections. She was Associate Dean of the Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge from 1997-2005.

Parker is known as a speaker and author of numerous publications on library leadership and disaster planning in libraries. Her ALA, LAMA, and ACRL service extends over more than 30 years. She earned a B.A. in History and English from Earlham College, an M.A. in U.S. history from Indiana University, a Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from Capella University, and the M.L.S. from Queens College, City University of New York. Parker was a member of the 2003 class of UCLA Senior Fellows and a member of the 2013-15 cohort of ARL Leadership Fellows.
iSchool Colloquia Series


 

Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Susan, E. Parker. (2012). Innovation and Change: Influences of Pre-Disaster Library Leadership in a Post-Disaster Environment. Advances in Library Administration and Organization, 31, 121-204. doi:10.1108/S0732-0671(2012)0000031006. [Link]

Susan E. Parker, Don Jaeger & Kristen Kern. (2008) What to Do When Disaster Strikes. The Serials Librarian, 44(3-4), 237-242, doi: 10.1300/J123v44n03_13. [Link]

 


UBC Library Research Guides

Library Resources for Teaching and Learning

Library, Archival, and Information Science


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Himalaya Program .

This conversation will give both authors the space to discuss their recently published novels, short stories, and non-fiction, and exchange their perspectives on what it means to represent Nepal and Tibet in the English-language literary scene in Canada and abroad.
Speaker Biographies:

Tsering Wangmo Dhompa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manjushree_Thapa) is the author of three collections of poetry: My rice tastes like the lake, In the Absent Everyday and Rules of the House (all from Apogee Press, Berkeley). My rice tastes like the lake was a finalist for the Northern California Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Year Award for 2012. Dhompa’s first non-fiction book, Coming Home to Tibet was published by Shambhala Publications in 2016. She teaches creative writing and is a PhD candidate in Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz.

Manjushree Thapa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsering_Wangmo_Dhompa) is the author of three novels, a short story collection and three nonfiction books about her homeland, Nepal. She is also a literary translator, and her translation of Darjeeling author Indra Bahadur Rai’s novel There’s a Carnival Today was released in South Asia in October 2017. The Canadian edition of her latest novel, All of Us in Our Own Lives, will be out in 2018. She lives in Toronto.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Dhompa, T. W. (2005). In the absent everyday. Berkeley, Calif: Apogee Press. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2005). Forget kathmandu: An elegy for democracy. New York, New York;New Delhi;: Penguin, Viking. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2004). friends. Manoa, 16(2), 169-183. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing.

People with mental illness and substance use challenges are among the most stigmatized population in the world. The field of neuroscience is making strides to redress this by changing the etiological paradigm from a pejorative behavior model to one that is brain based. Evidence from neuroscience serves as a powerful agent for challenging problematic beliefs and attitudes held by healthcare providers and society. Translating this evidence to current and future healthcare providers, to patients and the public, will contribute to breaking down barriers that prevent persons experiencing these challenges from seeking and utilizing treatment.

Bio: Deborah Finnell has specialized in mental health and addictions for most her nursing career. From her grounding as a registered nurse working in inpatient psychiatry, she expanded her role to that of a clinical nurse specialist and then a nurse practitioner. She brings her passion for the neurobiological bases of mental illness and substance use to her clinical practice, teaching, research, and policy/advocacy work. With funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dr. Finnell led the integration of substance-use related content including screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) into the nursing curricula at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She advocates for expanded access to mental illness and substance use treatment, such as calling for advanced practice nurses to prescribe buprenorphine. During her tenure with the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Hospital Administration, she conducted funded research focusing on improving the health of Veterans with mental and substance use disorders. Her professional leadership roles range from past chair of the New York State Peer Assistance Committee to past president of the International Nurses Society on Addictions. She served as chair of the Addictions Nursing Certification Board and was a member of the Committee on Nursing Standards for the American Nurses Association. She currently serves on the board of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) and is associate editor of that organization’s professional journal, Substance Abuse.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Carey, M. G., Al-Zaiti, S. S., Dean, G. E., Sessanna, L., & Finnell, D. S. (2011). Sleep problems, depression, substance use, social bonding, and quality of life in professional firefighters. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(8), 928-933. [Link]

Crickman, R., & Finnell, D. (2016;2015;). Systematic review of control measures to reduce hazardous drug exposure for health care workers. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 31(2), 183-190. [Link]

Sanchez, M., & Finnell, D. (2017). Alcohol screening and brief intervention for persons living with HIV. Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in Aids Care, 28(2), 266-278. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC iSchool.

Abstract: In this talk, I seek to understand what we mean by information access, and what it means to provide information access in a responsible way. Specifically, I examine the idea of facts. How should providers of information deal with facts? To examine this question, I consider the 2017 protest slogan “Librarians for Facts.” What does this slogan really mean? Ultimately, I suggest that information providers need to determine what they are for, and orient information access mechanisms toward that goal.

Bio: Melanie Feinberg is an Associate Professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a classificationist whose research approach combines design with the humanities. Her work focuses on learning how to read and write databases to complement our engineering and mining of them. She received her PhD in 2008 from the iSchool at the University of Washington; she has a master’s from the iSchool at Berkeley (2004) and was an undergraduate at Stanford (1992). In her professional career before returning to academia, she was a content strategist and technical editor, working at companies such as Apple Computer, Scient, and PeopleSoft.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Feinberg, M. (2017). Reading databases: Slow information interactions beyond the retrieval paradigm. Journal of Documentation, 73(2), 336-356. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2017). The value of discernment: Making use of interpretive flexibility in metadata generation and aggregation. Information Research-an International Electronic Journal, 22(1), 1. [Link]

Feinberg, M. (2011). How information systems communicate as documents: The concept of authorial voice. Journal of Documentation, 67(6), 1015-1037. [Link]


As part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, a myriad of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines discuss the topic of advancing health and inclusion.


Speakers

Laura Bulk (Rehabilitation Science) is part of the Being Blind team, working to expose misperceptions about what it means to be Blind, and to create an engaging campaign challenging such misperceptions.

Bulmaro Valdes (Biomedical Engineering) applies his science and engineering knowledge to help people with disabilities. He works directly with stroke survivors and therapists to develop new technological solutions to current rehabilitation issues.

Beth Clark (Interdisciplinary Studies) focuses on how transgender youth, their parents, caregivers, and health care providers can work together to make health care decisions that support trans youth well-being.

Stephanie Glegg (Rehabilitation Science) examines how relationships support/hinder evidence uptake in healthcare. By targeting the social influences that drive evidence use, she aims to improve patients’ timely access to healthcare innovations.

Aarthi Gobinath (Neuroscience) works on treating postpartum depression, investigating how different types of maternal antidepressant exposure affect the neurobiology of mothers and the male and female offspring in adulthood.

Celestin Hategeka (Population and Public Health) evaluates the effectiveness and implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention (ETAT+) in Rwanda to improve quality of hospital care for newborns and children.

Jaime Semchuk (Educational and Counselling Psychology) collaborates with high schools in BC to adapt, implement, and evaluate mental health literacy interventions with an aim to build capacity for promoting student wellbeing, reducing stigma, and effectively supporting students who experience mental health difficulties.

Evan Taylor (Language and Literacy Education) is a health literacy researcher and advocate whose work focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming people’s experiences of cancer and health decision-making.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bulk, L. et al. (2017). ‘We are not anything alike’: marginalization of health professionals with disabilities. Disability & Society. [Link]

Bulk, L., Glegg, S. et al. (2015). The legitimization process of students with disabilities in health and human service educational programs in Canada. Disability & Society. [Link]

Valdes, B. et al. (2016). Kinecting the moves: The kinematic potential of rehabilitation-specific gaming to inform treatment for hemiparesis. International Journal of Child Health and Human Development. [Link]

Clark, B. et al. (2017). “I would have preferred more options”: Accounting for non‐binary youth in health research. Nursing Inquiry. [Link]

Glegg, S., Livingstone, R., & Montgomery, I. (2016).Facilitating interprofessional evidence-based practice in paediatric rehabilitation: Development, implementation and evaluation of an online toolkit for health professionals. Disability and Rehabilitation. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Choleris, E., & Galea, L. A. M. (2017). Sex, hormones, and genotype interact to influence psychiatric disease, treatment, and behavioral research: Sex, hormones, and genotype in behavioral research. Journal of Neuroscience Research. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Mahmoud, R., & Galea, L. A. M. (2014). Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: Focus on behavior, glucocorticoids, and hippocampus. Frontiers in Neuroscience. [Link]

Hategeka, C., Mwai, L., & Tuyisenge, L. (2017).Implementing the emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care (ETAT+) clinical practice guidelines to improve quality of hospital care in rwandan district hospitals: Healthcare workers’ perspectives on relevance and challenges. [Link]

Hategeka, C., et al. (2017). Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda. Plos One. [Link]

Semchuk, J. (2016). Adolescent experiences of seeking and receiving support at school for significant mental health concerns. [Link]

Taylor, E. T. (2013). Transmen’s health care experiences: Ethical social work practice beyond the binary. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services. [Link]

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