Date: September 1 to October 12, 2017
Location: UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Level 2 Foyer (1961 East Mall) (map)
Hours: same as the IKBLC building hours (see hours)

Popular Art is the name given to the artistic creations made by peasants, indigenous people or craftsmen with no formal artistic training. A traditional popular art item is handmade and has a functional purpose opposing an art object that is made for aesthetic purposes only, however, in the XXI Century technique has evolved to a more aesthetic representation.

Presented by MexicoFest, we invite all art enthusiasts to attend this free exhibition at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre on Mexican Popular Art objects.

The 2017/18 Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) call for community submissions is now open.

The deadline is Friday, June 16, 2017.

Learning Initiatives for Rural and Northern BC (LIRN BC) is a collaborative approach to building on the capacities of rural, remote and Northern British Columbian communities. LIRN BC is listed as a project of the BC Rural Network, established in 2004.

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is proud to partner through LIRN BC with government and non-government organizations to provide and facilitate workshops to promote community learning and collaboration in rural and northern communities.

LIRN BC can bring trainers and facilitators to your community to deliver a learning event for residents.

The annual call for “Expressions of Interest” (EOI) occurs May and June each year.  It includes summaries for roughly 25 workshops offered by LIRN BC partner organizations (including an option to “build your own topic”).

In responding to the call for EOIs, applicants are asked to tell us about your community and its challenges, and identify up to three workshop topics that will help your community move forward. If your agency is selected, you will be contacted by a LIRN BC partner who will work with you to design and deliver a learning event that meets the needs of your community. Successful applicants would be expected to provide publicity support, venue and refreshments.

Click here to download the Expressions of Interest document.

The current LIRN BC partners are:

  • Association of Neighbourhood Houses BC (ANHBC)
  • BC Centre for Employment Excellence
  • BC Healthy Communities (PlanH Program)
  • UBC Library, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
  • Leave Out Violence (LOVE) Society of BC
  • PeerNetBC
  • SPARC BC
  • Vantage Point
  • Volunteer BC
  • YouthCo

For further information please contact jsands@sparc.bc.ca.

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health.

This event happened on Wednesday, 15 March 2017.


Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry)

Evan Bowness (IRES)

Mollie Chapman (IRES)

Tugce Conger (IRES)

Jamie Fenneman (Botany)

Graham McDowell (IRES)

Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health)

Steve Williams (IRES)

Stefan Pauer (Law).


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Chapman, M. (2005). Once upon a time in volcán, costa rica: Integrating values into watershed management and poverty alleviation. Review of Policy Research, 22(6), 859-880. doi:10.1111/j.1541-1338.2005.00179.x [Link]

Comack, E., & Bowness, E. (2010). Dealing the race card: Public discourse on the policing of winnipeg’s inner-city communities. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 19(1), 34-50. [Link]

Toft, M., Adeyeye, Y., & Lund, J. (2015). The use and usefulness of inventory-based management planning to forest management: Evidence from community forestry in nepal. Forest Policy and Economics, 60, 35-49. doi:10.1016/j.forpol.2015.06.007 [Link]

Williams, S., Bradley, H., Devadson, R., & Erickson, M. (2013). Globalization and work. Cambridge: Polity Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks HD6955 .W55 2013]


UBC Library Research Guides

Education

Please join us for an exploration of cultural humility and what it means for how we teach and learn. We will hear from Dr. Evan Adams, Chief Medical Officer of the First Nations Health Authority and a trailblazer in promoting cultural humility within the healthcare system.

With humour and wisdom, Dr. Adams offers insights into the journey of cultural humility and how this ongoing process of learning and reflecting can strengthen relationships and improve outcomes.

Participants are welcomed and encouraged to engage in this interactive session to advance the dialogue on cultural humility and learn from one another’s journeys.

Learning Objectives
1.       Explore the meaning of cultural safety and cultural humility.
2.       Reflect on the role of cultural humility in your work – how can cultural humility enhance experiences in the classroom?

If you are unable to attend this session in person and want to join us via webinar please register here: http://learningcircle.ubc.ca/about/session-registration-form/webinar-registration-on-territory-acknowledgements/

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 10:00 am-12:00 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)


Speaker Biography

Dr. Evan Adams is a citizen of Tla’amin (Sliammon) First Nation in Powell River, BC, and Chief Medical Officer at the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), the first health authority of its kind in Canada. In this role, Dr. Adams acts as the “face” of the FNHA’s public health function and serves as its representative / keynote speaker at health conferences and community events. He also develops and/or strengthens partnerships with First Nations health governance partners, BC First Nations, provincial and federal government health agencies, and other FNHA departments, to establish relationships and action plans. Before joining the FNHA, Dr. Adams served as Deputy Provincial Health Officer (BC), where he provided direction on First Nations health issues to the Ministry of Health, reported to First Nations citizens on health issues affecting the general population, and set out a path for the improvement of First Nations health and wellness. He completed an MD at the University of Calgary, an Aboriginal Family Practice residency at St Paul’s Hospital/UBC (as Chief Resident), and a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University. (Photo by Nadya Kwandibens)

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

 

Acknowledgement: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to contribute to the promotion of this unique opportunity.  We acknowledge the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society’s website as the source for most of this content.

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society is an enterprising non-profit organization that develops and delivers transformative education inspired by Haida Gwaii. In partnership with leading universities, we offer students immersive, experiential learning opportunities in rural, resource-dependent communities in transition. Here the Haida Nation, island communities, and provincial and federal governments are working through complex joint management models towards reconciliation and sustainability.

Drawing on Haida Gwaii’s legacy of innovation and leadership, HGHES offers a range of programming including undergraduate semesters, executive education and professional development courses, research opportunities, public lectures and workshops, and more.

The Haida Gwaii Semesters include the following areas of focus:

  1. Natural Resource Science
  2. Natural Resource Studies
  3. Reconciliation Studies
  4. Marine Planning

Please visit http://hghes.ca/haida-gwaii-semesters/ for more information, including the application process, tuition, fees and FAQs

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society embraces a place-based approach; we see the social and ecological systems of Haida Gwaii as vibrant natural classrooms for our students to engage with, grounding course content in living, local case studies. We believe in working together and facilitating a rich collaboration between academics and local knowledge holders, supporting a meaningful learning exchange and the development of a broad perspective.

  • As issues around the globe become increasingly complex, If students are from UBC, there is an agreement in place to facilitate registration.
  • For non-UBC students there is an opportunity to earn UBC credits and transfer them back to the student’s home institution.

 

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. The Archives Association of British Columbia (AABC) and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre are pleased to present the webcast roundtable “Talking with First Nations Archives. ” Colleagues who work in local First Nations Archives, Resource Centres and in Records Management programs will share their experiences establishing archives, their role in facilitating access to records, and issues and concerns they encounter on a daily basis.

This event happened on February 23, 2017.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Lawson, K. L. (2004, November 24). Precious fragments : First Nations materials in archives, libraries and museums (T). [Link]

UBC Library Research Guides

Archival Material

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Library & Archival Studies

Every Spring since 1981, Vancouver’s Alcuin Society holds a national competition to select the country’s most beautiful books of the previous year. The winning books tour every province in Canada, and are also exhibited at the two major book fairs in Germany, in Frankfurt and Leipzig. As well, copies are donated to the Canadian Embassy Library in Tokyo, where they are exhibited during the Tokyo International Book Fair.

 

The purpose of the competition is to motivate publishers to pay attention to the look of books, as well as to their content. In addition, the Society hopes to encourage book designers by national and international recognition of their work.

 

The books are judged by three different jurors each year – experts in their fields from all over the country, and, occasionally, from abroad. The entire book is taken into account: the cover, the choice of type, layout, white space; paper used, readibility, creativity in design; and most of all, the appropriateness of the design to the content.

 

This March, IKBLC is exhibiting the winners from last year’s competition. There are eight categories of books: from children’s books to pictorial, from poetry to reference. Some of the judges’ comments on what they liked about the books are available, and displayed near the books.

 

PDFs of the full-colour awards catalogues are available online for some of the past competition winners. In mid-March 2017, the Society’s 35th competition will take place in Vancouver, for Canada’s 2016 publications, and when it’s published, this year’s catalogue will be available online as well.

 

This exhibit takes place March 1 to 31, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level).

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