In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health. Can’t make this event? It will be made online for viewing from the IKBLC webcast portal.

Date: Wednesday, 15 March 2017, 6:30-8:30pm at UBC Robson Square, Room C100

Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry), Evan Bowness (IRES), Mollie Chapman (IRES), Tugce Conger (IRES), Jamie Fenneman (Botany), Graham McDowell (IRES), Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health), Steve Williams (IRES), Stefan Pauer (Law).

Experience Some of the Best of UBC

Offered on Saturdays in the fall and winter terms at the UBC Point Grey campus, One Day @ UBC single-day courses provide easy and affordable access to top experts in their field – and the small class size ensures ample opportunities for discussion. One Day @ UBC courses can be applied toward a UBC Certificate in Liberal Studies.

Sign up to UBC Continuing Studies’ email subscription list to receive valuable news and updates about its upcoming courses, too.


Course List

Calling Cartographers: Learn Open Source Geographic Information Systems

Diabetes: How interactions between our Genes and Environment Cause a Global Epidemic

Egypt and the Bible: Cultural Contact in Literature, Religion and Art

Object Lessons, Object Questions: A One Day Experiment @ MOA

Politics, Literature and Painting through Three Women of the 20th Century: Evita Peron, Gabriela Mistral and Frida Kahlo

Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: How Can We Best Produce our Food?

Sleep: Your Other Life

Thor and Company: Old Norse Mythology through the Ages

 

 

Freedom of Expression is a charter right in Canada and is a fundamental value of professional groups such as librarians, archivists and journalists, who promote transparency, public accountability and the broadest possible access to information. However, we are seeing an erosion of these values in public life, through steps to censor scientists and public servants, to retract, hide or ignore information that does not conform to partisan views, and to treat the free press as a public enemy. This is a symptom of “post-truth” politics, in which sentiment and personal belief have more influence than facts, and facts are openly manipulated. As fake news, Orwellian newspeak and “alternative facts” flood our media streams, how do we continue to make sense of our world? How do we hold public figures accountable for their actions?

This open mic session invites the UBC community to speak up on what freedom of expression means in this post-truth era. Bring your thoughts, arguments, poems, and stories – everyone is welcome!


Event Details

When:  February 28th, 2017 12:30-1:45 PM

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 2nd floor foyer space

Facilitator(s): Milena Constanda, Erin Fields

Register for this event through your UBC Campus-Wide Login here.

 

Does the metaphor for coming out work out cross-culturally? What does or can family look like to LGBTQ Asians? What does it mean and how can one be an ally to the LGBTQ+ Asian community?

This month’s ACAM Dialogue is focused on LGBTQ+ and non-heteronormative sexualities as well as what it means to be a queer Asian Canadian. UBC students will share their experiences of navigating school, life, and their communities as an LGBTQ Asian, followed by a brief Q+A and an opportunity for attendees to engage in group discussions about current themes and topics within the Asian Canadian community. Light snacks will be provided and it is free to RSVP.


Event Details

When: March 3rd from 3:00pm-5:00pm
Where: Lillooet Room (Irving K. Barber Learning Centre room 301)
RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/queer-asian-canadians-acam-dialogue-tickets-32316531616


Student Panelists

Justin Lam (He/him)
Justin is a fourth-year student of French and Asian Studies. His academic interests lie in South Asian linguistics and their ties to expressions of religious (particularly Muslim) identity in the subcontinent. He is a big Mariah Carey fan and highly prefers dogs over cats.

Chandima Silva (He/him)
Chandima is Third year Asian Area Studies student who is interested in the intersections of religion, ethnicity and nationalism. He is also the project assistant at the CISAR. He loves Shyam Selvadurai, ice cream and cats (and dogs).

Yulanda Lui
Yulanda is a queer Chinese settler born on Anishinaabe territory under the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Agreement. They are in her final year of the Gender, Race, Sexuality & Social Justice program with a minor in Asian Canadian and Asian Migration studies. She is a member of the student committee for the ACAM dialogues on sexual violence, a facilitator of QTBIMPOC space, and a youth organizer in Chinatown. A Virgo sun/moon/rising, Yulanda is a fierce believer in collectivity and possibility, and can be found learning and playing in spaces of magic, community, and utopia.


This event will be taking place on the traditional, unceded, ancestral homelands of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) First Nation. We recognize that sexual violence plays a key role in colonial and gendered violence, and continues to affect Indigenous communities. As the land which UBC is situated on was taken without consent, we ask settlers to consider what it means to be good guests in the spaces they navigate.
Along the same line of thinking through space, we are prioritizing the ACAM Dialogue as a student and survivor-centric event that centers Indigenous and POC students (particularly Asian Canadian student communities). Please be mindful of this if you plan on attending. If you have any questions or concerns about what it means to be an ally, feel free to contact acam.events@ubc.ca.


Accessibility Info

Please let us know if you have any special dietary needs. If you have questions or other accessibility needs, please email acam.events@ubc.ca

This event is organized by the ACAM Dialogues: Extending the Conversation on Sexual Violence in Asian Communities on Campus and Beyond project. These dialogues examine the intersections of race, gender, and violence, especially as they impact Asian student communities and open up spaces for students to share experiences and resources, build analyses, and discuss strategies of organizing against sexual and other forms of violence. The series will culminate in a public symposium in Spring 2017 to bring these conversations to a wider audience at UBC and beyond.

For more information, please visit http://acamdialogues.arts.ubc.ca/
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/acam.arts.ubc
Twitterhttp://www.twitter.com/UBCACAM

 

We are excited to announce that the corridor and atrium on the 3rd and 4th floor of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre will receive upgrades and renovations starting from Tuesday, Febrary 7, 2017. The Routine Capital funding from the Ministry of Advanced Education has been made available for this project to replace the flooring in the corridors and carpet in the atrium spaces.


Renovation Details:

Renovations: February 7 – March 31, 2017

Locations: 3rd and 4th Floor Corridors and Atrium

Floor Plans

3rd floor corridors and the Qualicum Room

4th floor corridors and the Golden Jubilee Room


The corridors will continue to be open and available for access. Contractors will be on-site and will begin to remove furniture in the corridors of the 3rd and 4th floor. During this time, study spaces in those corridors will not be available. We understand that this timing is not ideal for renovations, as students may be impacted. However, every effort will be made to maintain available study space for students and minimize disruptions to building users.

Please join us at an exhibition showcasing the scholarly and creative publications of contract faculty members at UBC. Academics who teach on contract at UBC have published a wide range of research papers and books. In addition, contract faculty at UBC, have produced multi-media presentations and talks, some of which will be presented during this exhibition.

Refreshments will be served.

We are grateful for the support of the UBC Faculty Association and UBC Library.


Event Details

Date: February 16, 2017

Time: 11am-4pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room

In coordination with our current exhibition Ever Austen: Literary Timelessness in the Regency Period, Rare Books and Special Collections is delighted to host a special Austen-themed panel discussion. We’re delighted to be joined by scholars from both UBC and SFU for this fascinating discussion on and celebration of Jane Austen, in honour of the 200th anniversary of her death.

Jane Austen’s Print Trouble

Michelle Levy
Professor and Graduate Program Chair, Department of English, SFU
Kandice Sharren
Ph.D. candidate, Department of English, SFU

Although today regarded as one of the world’s great novelists, Austen’s success in print did not come during her lifetime. She had trouble finding publishers for her work; several of her works sold poorly; she earned little from them; and received only one major review. Our talk will explore this surprising publishing and printing history, offering insight into the challenges Austen faced in the difficult print marketplace of early nineteenth-century Britain.

Gothic Influences

Scott MacKenzie
Associate Professor, Department of English, UBC

It is tempting to see, in Northanger Abbey, a rejection of the values and conventions that we associate with gothic fiction, but Austen’s investment in gothic fiction is considerably more complex than simply as something to poke fun at. The novels of Ann Radcliffe in particular are among the most important precursors to Austen’s literary triumphs.

Jane Austen as Popular Culture: Then and Now

Tiffany Potter
Senior Instructor, Associate Head (Curriculum & Planning), and First-Year English Coordinator, Department of English, UBC

Jane Austen’s novels are widely read as Important Literature in university curricula, but she was a non-elite, popular writer in her own day, and her place in popular culture has expanded wildly in recent decades. This talk will engage current theories of popular culture to consider Austen’s work in the Regency and in recent popular culture, including film and television versions and novel adaptations that re-tell her stories for new audiences.

The panel will be moderated by UBC’s Professor Emeritus of English Herbert Rosengarten.


Event Details

Date: Thursday March 2, 2017
Time: 1:00-3:00 PM
Where: Lillooet Room (301), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre


The event is free and open to the public. We hope you can join us! For more information, please contact Rare Books and Special Collections at 604 822-2521 or rare.books@ubc.ca.

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