The Asian Library hosted a lively Diwali celebration at the Liu Institute with the support of UBC Equity & Inclusion, Alumni UBC, and the Centre for Indian and South Asian Research on Friday, October 25. In addition to learning about the tradition of Diwali through a student-led presentation, audience members were treated to a variety of musical and dance performances, from traditional to modern, and Henna painting. The event concluded with South Asian refreshments.

 

 

Come and celebrate Diwali (Festival of Lights) with the Asian Library, with the support of Centre for India and South Asia Research (CISAR), alumni UBC  and the Equity and Inclusion Office!

Friday, October 25, 2019
12:00 noon to 1:30 pm
Liu Institute for Global Issues, 6476 NW Marine Drive

Diwali or Deepavali, which means “a row of lights”, is the most widely celebrated festival in India and throughout the Indian diaspora. It is celebrated on Amavasya (darkest night or no moon day), it usually takes place at the end of October or the first week of November. Diwali marks the victory of good over evil, and the beginning of the New Year in India. The festival celebration, which typically lasts from five to seven days, is celebrated by several South Asian Communities, and by the majority of Indians regardless of faith, including Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists and Christians. On Diwali, people decorate their houses with diyas, candles as well as colourful lights, and they share gifts and recite prayers.

UBC students, staff and faculty members are cordially invited to experience the diversity of South Asian culture through music, henna, and delicious refreshments.

All Diwali activities are free and no registration is required.

Come and celebrate the Year of the Pig with the Asian Library and the Department of Asian Studies on Friday February 8 at the Nest Atrium Lower Level. Enjoy wonderful performances and participate in interesting cultural activities. It is free and open to the public!

Drop by our Pop-up Library booth between 11:00 am and 2:00 pm. We will feature our Great Reads Collection and language learning materials. You can also test your knowledge on the Lunar New Year and the UBC Library. Same as the past years, all visitors to the Asian Library booth will receive a pocket of luck (while quantities last)!

The celebration organized by the Department of Asian Studies will run from 11:00 am to 4:30 pm. Performances include lion dance, Korean drumming, K-pop dance, and Chinese music, etc. They also offer hands-on activities like Chinese calligraphy, seal engraving, Cantonese Mahjong, Ring Toss, and more. Check out more details HERE!

The Asian Library would like to wish everyone a happy and prosperous Year of the Pig. We look forward to seeing you on February 8!

Come and celebrate Diwali (Festival of Lights) with the Asian Library, Centre for India and South Asia Research (CISAR), Department of Asian Studies, and South Asian Canadian Histories Association this year!

Friday, October 26, 2018
12:00 noon to 1:30 pm
Asian Centre Auditorium, 1871 West Mall

Diwali or Deepavali, which means “a row of lights”, is the most widely celebrated festival in India and throughout the Indian diaspora. Celebrated on Amavasya (darkest night or no moon day), it usually takes place at the end of October or the first week of November. Diwali marks the victory of good over evil, and the beginning of the New Year in India. The festival celebration, which typically lasts from five to seven days, is celebrated by the majority of Indians regardless of faith, including Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Buddhists. On Diwali, people decorate their houses with diyas, candles as well as colourful lights, and they share gifts and recite prayers.

UBC students, staff and faculty members are cordially invited to experience the diversity of culture through music, Henna, and delicious refreshments.

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