Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]

We owe another shoutout to Christina at Lam for telling us how much she likes FedFlix!  We agree – it’s terrific!

FedFlix is a collection of US government public information and training films hosted over at the Internet Archive:  FedFlix is a “Joint Venture NTIS-1832 between the National Technical Information Service and Public.Resource.Org. Here we feature the best movies of the United States Government, from training films to history, from our national parks to the U.S. Fire Academy and the Postal Inspectors, all of these fine flix are available for reuse without any restrictions whatsoever.”

  • The content covers a wide range of topics, from forest fire control to workplace integrity, military etiquette, mining safety, cold war, homeland security/civil defence and culture, religion and communities training courtesy of the Chicago police department.
  • Here are just a few sample titles you can watch: Why Vietnam (1965, Dept of Defense); the much spoofed Duck and Cover (1951, Federal Civil Defense Administration); Central Intelligence Agency True Stories (1963; and Assessing the Madoff Ponzi Scheme Part 1 and Part 2 (2009, US House of Representatives)

You may wonder – does Canada have a repository like this?  Not exactly, but we do have a couple of great sources of film clips that cover a wide range of social and political topics:

  • The CBC Archives is a wonderful source of CBC radio and television clips.  Topics include Federal and Provincial elections;  the path to Canada’s Constitution; separatism; abortion; women politicians; and foreign relations.  There is also a great deal of content on various prominent political leaders such as Pierre Trudeau, Tommy Douglas, Ed Broadbent, Maurice Duplessis, William Lyon MacKenzie King, Paul Martin, Robert Bourassa, and Rene Levesque.

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