Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC. For years the possibility of new and expanded pipelines running across BC have raised questions related to First Nations land rights, coastal tanker traffic, and the nature of inter-provincial relationships. Underlying these questions, however, has always been the larger question of why we are continuing to invest in fossil fuel infrastructure at all given our international climate commitments. Join our panel of experts as they examine the economic, environmental, and public policy ramifications of the recent approvals.

Moderator:

Dan Burritt, BA’04 – Host and Producer, CBC Vancouver News

Speakers

Kathryn Harrison, PhD’93 – Professor, Political Science, UBC Faculty of Arts

George Hoberg – Professor, Liu Institute for Global Studies, UBC

Stewart Muir, MA’94 – Executive Director, Resource Works

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip – President, Union of BC Indian Chiefs

Solomon Reece – President and CEO, Four Eagles Sustainable Development


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Hoberg, G. (2013). The battle over oil sands access to tidewater: A political risk analysis of pipeline alternatives. Canadian Public Policy / Analyse De Politiques, 39(3), 371-391. [Link]

Hoberg, G., & Meadowcroft, J. (2015). Climate action. Alternatives Journal, 41(1), 58. [Link]

St-Laurent, G., Hagerman, S., & Hoberg, G. (2017). Emergence and influence of a new policy regime: The case of forest carbon offsets in british columbia. Land use Policy, 60, 169-180. [Link]

This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

The Indigitization program focuses on the conservation and preservation of Indigenous community information resources. The deadline for applications has been extended to 5 pm on April 8th, 2015.
Third funding cycle opens for Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program. The deadline for applications is August 1, 2014.

Doodled desks 2From The Vancouver Sun article:

Key education stakeholders are asking the B.C. government to require all students to take a course in aboriginal studies before graduation.

While they already learn about aboriginal issues during Social Studies classes, this proposal would require students to also take a separate course, such as B.C. First Nations Studies 12 or the First Peoples course offered in Grades 10, 11 and 12.

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