Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre as part of the Robson Reading Series.

“In this fluid collection we enter a galactic expanse where absence, distance and fire repel and attract love-bodies in a winged-whirl of magnetic mad flight. Loss, emptiness, space, desire, blood, memory; all devour themselves in the combustions of love without self. The you/other may be interchangeable, never static or frozen or attainable. In these sharp-beaked bird-worlds there is “no going back” – at best, bodies meet only “flame to flame,” mutable and razor-like in feathery, impermanent forms. I find Hunter’s new work a rare melding of Blues, Kabbalah, and personal transcendence– a piercing, hard-won angelic love mantra. A blazing tour de force!”
- Juan Felipe Herrera, California Poet Laureate

“What lies here are the vagaries of a heart wounded, shattered, and redeemed by love. Such generosity of spirit deserves acclaim. A bravura work.”
- Richard Wagamese, author of Indian Horse”

Biography

Al Hunter is an Anishinaabe writer who has published poetry in books and journals around the world, taught extensively, and performed internationally, including, at the International Poetry Festival of Medellin. A member of Rainy River First Nations and former chief, Hunter has expertise in land claims negotiations, and is a longstanding activist on behalf of indigenous rights and wellness, and environmental responsibility. Hunter lives in Manitou Rapids, Rainy River First Nations in Ontario.

Al is also the founder and president of Good Life for Young Peoples


Select Books Available at UBC Library

Hunter, Al. (2001) Spirit Horses. Wiarton, Ont: Kegedonce Press. Link: http://resolve.library.ubc.ca/cgi-bin/catsearch?bid=2556621


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

First Nations

Literature Reviews



Assessing and incorporating teaching and learning resources by and about First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples is critical for librarians, educators and parents. Awareness of diverse epistemologies, notions of cultural authenticity and historical accuracy, and the influence of colonialism, are essential when considering books, films and interactive media for library and classroom collections. This panel will address challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous librarians, educators and parents when drawing upon materials representing Indigenous peoples and cultures. They will offer insights about such issues as cultural appropriation, stereotypes, addressing colonialism and what to do with dated resources. This session is ideal for teacher candidates, classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, youth librarians and parents.

Convener: Jo-Anne Naslund, UBC Education Library
Moderator: Lisa P. Nathan, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the First Nations Curriculum Concentration, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
Panelists: Debra Martel, Associate Director, First Nations House of Learning;
Allison Taylor-McBryde, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies.

About the Speakers

Jo-Anne Naslund is the Instructional Programs Librarian at the Education Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialties are in Canadian children’s literature, children’s literature, and education.

Lisa P. Nathan is an Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia’s School of Library, Archival and Information Studies. She is also currently serving as the Coordinator for the school’s First Nations Curriculum Concentration. For more information about Professor Nathan, please visit: http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/lnathan/

Debra Martel is the Associate Director of the UBC First Nations House of Learning. Debra has dedicated over 22 years working in the public K-12 school system in a variety of teaching and administrative positions before joining UBC in August, 2011. She is passionate in her work and strives to create learning environments that are both inclusive and rewarding.  She is proud of her Cree, Metis, Irish and Scottish ancestry.

Allison Taylor-McBryde is an Adjunct Professor at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies at the University of British Columbia. She is also Coordinator for Children’s & Young Adult Services at the North Vancouver District Public Library.


Select Articles Available at UBC

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Celebrate Science Fundraiser for CCBC. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6. [Link]

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Inuit Publisher. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6 [Link]

Nathan, L.P. (2012). Sustainable Information Practice: An Ethnographic Investigation. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 63(11). pp. 2254-2268. [Link]

Hourcade, J.; Bullock-Rest, N.; Jayatilaka, L.; Nathan, L. (2012). HCI for Peace: Beyond Tie Dye. Interactions. 19(5). pp. 40-47. [Link]

Taylor-McBryde, A. (2011, April). Poetry and Pictures Capture Imagination. North Shore News. p. 21. [Link]

Taylor-McBryde, A. (2011, Feb. 16). Librarians Share the Love. North Shore News. p. 20. [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

Library, Archival, and Information Science


The role of libraries will be examined — specifically the Education Library, First Nations House of Learning Xwi7xwa Library, and more broadly, school libraries. The re-imagined teacher education program has inspired revision in the role Education librarians play to respectfully and meaningfully integrate First Nations history, content, and world-views; commit to inquiry and research oriented education; and emphasize diversity and social and ecological justice. Our libraries can support teacher candidates as they acquire theoretical understandings for teaching and apply those theories in their practice. We bring teacher candidates and ideas together in library spaces that offer unique learning environments, where inquiry, collaboration, the role of Indigenous Knowledge, relationships and ways of knowing are celebrated. This session will be interactive: we present our re-imagined roles and seek feedback and ideas to further ensure our relevance for faculty and teacher candidates.

Speakers include: Jo-Anne Naslund, Acting Head, Instructional Programs Librarian, Education Library; Education Library; Sarah Dupont, Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, First Nations House of Learning—Xwi7xwa Library.

About the Speakers

Jo-Anne Naslund is the Instructional Programs Librarian at the Education Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialties are in Canadian children’s literature, children’s literature, and education.

Sarah Dupont is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and at Xwi7xwa Library at the University of British Columbia. Her subject specialty is in First Nations sources.


Select Articles Available at UBC

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Celebrate Science Fundraiser for CCBC. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6. [Link]

Naslund, J.A. (2010). Inuit Publisher. Canadian Children’s Book News. 33(3). p. 6 [Link]


UBC Research Guides

Aboriginal Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

Library, Archival, and Information Science

Subject Resources for First Nations

LibFOCUS enewsletter

This month’s issue of LibFOCUS celebrates First Nations, Inuit and Métis people by looking at the roles they play in Canada’s past, present and future. Highlights include a feature on Aboriginal (Un)History Month events, a profile of Xwi7xwa Library, and Aboriginal scholarship resources at UBC.

 

Xwi7xwa Library

Xwi7xwa (pronounced “whei-wha”) means “echo” in the Squamish language. Guided by Raven, symbol of creativity and learning, the Library strives to echo First Nations and Aboriginal voices and scholarship through its collections, instructional services and programs, and guides. Xwi7xwa Library is the only Aboriginal branch of a university library in Canada.

Mapping Knowledges at Xwi7xwa Library

Library collections comprise a vast territory of scholarship, intellectual traditions, cultural histories and memory. The Xwi7xwa Library catalogue maps this territory to reveal the Indigenous content hidden there. It thereby facilitates research, helps students create their own learning paths, and increases Aboriginal awareness for a wider public.

Xwi7xwa Library serves the First Nations House of Learning (FNHL) mandate to make the University’s vast resources more accessible to Aboriginal peoples. It identifies and promotes research of benefit to First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. By making these resources more accessible, the Library aims to educate the University community and wider community about Aboriginal issues and concerns.

Current Projects: Preserving Memory

Xwi7xwa Library undertakes best practices in the preservation and digitization of unique materials. It develops protocols that respect Aboriginal concerns regarding Indigenous cultural and intellectual property.

Explore Xwi7xwa Library resources:

Aboriginal UnHistory Month

The University of British Columbia Point Grey campus is located on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people. We thank Musqueam for its hospitality and support of our work. 

UBC Library, in partnership with the Musqueam Indian Band, the Centre for Teaching and Learning Technology and the Museum of Anthropology, has coordinated a series of events in June.

Aboriginal (Un)History Month celebrates Aboriginal creativity, scholarship, and intellectual traditions. It aims to educate, and cultivate conversations about relationship, representation, and recognition.

The events, which include film screenings, discussions, lectures, exhibits and tours, introduce some of the dimensions of Aboriginal scholarship, and celebrate creative expression and pedagogy at UBC Vancouver and beyond. 

Throughout the month, these events introduce a wide range of Aboriginal experience and examine different meanings of the term “history” through the leadership of Aboriginal youth, research, media and curriculum resources. 

Historic representations of Aboriginal peoples have contributed to the development of negative stereotypes. Ways of dislodging stereotypes are explored through a spectrum of imagery, objects, and texts from various media, including student films. 

The month of June is designated as “Aboriginal History Month” by the federal government of Canada.

June 1 – 29 Aboriginal (Un)History Month: Cultivating Conversations (Exhibit) 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. daily in the Main Foyer and Ike’s Cafe, Level 2, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

June 14

Event Opening and Musqueam Film Screening

1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the  Victoria Learning Theatre (Room 182), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

*please note this event was rescheduled from June 5 to June 14. 

June 13 Native Youth Program (NYP) Student Film Screening (poster) 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the  Victoria Learning Theatre (Room 182), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
June 19 “What I Learned in Class Today:” Using film to create dialogue at UBC (Presentation and discussion) 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fraser River Room (227), CTLT, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
June 20 Guided Open House at Audrey & Harry Hawthorn Library & Archives and the Museum of Anthropology (Tour) 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Museum of Anthropology
June 21 National Aboriginal Day (community activities across Canada; local activities across the Lower Mainland)

all day; various locations

June 25 The Indigitization Tool Kit for First Nations Community Digitization Projects (Presentation) 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Dodson Room (302), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

Coordinators: Aboriginal (Un)History Month was coordinated by UBC Library (Xwi7xwa Library, the Irving K Barber Learning Centre), the Musqueam Indian Band, the Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology, the Museum of Anthropology and the Native Youth Program

Coordinator Logos

After 16 years of negotiations, the BC Treaty Commission asks Harper to step in – article from Globe and Mail.

The BC Treaty Commission’s annual report for 2009 is available online.

On October 13, 2009, the BC Treaty Commission released the  Common Table Report, which captures the 13 days of discussions in 2008 among the governments of Canada and British Columbia and more than 60 First Nations. Included are 21 opportunities the parties agreed to explore further to move treaty negotiations forward.

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