Photo by stevepb @ pixabay.com

The International Monetary Fund, an organization of 189 countries focusing such issues as global monetary cooperation, financial stability, sustainable economic growth and reducing poverty, has developed a microsite for resources on the subject of inclusion and economic inequality (http://inequality.elibrary.imf.org/).

The website brings together books, original research, statistical data, and more in a searchable interface.  Browse the whole collection or limit by region using an interactive map filter and/or series or author.

Topics in the Inclusion and Economic Inequality IMF site include:

  • Poverty and Homelessness
  • Social Public Policy
  • Economic Development
  • Significant works to date include*:

Gender Inequality Index – An index for measurement of gender disparity that was introduced in the 2010 Human Development Report 20th anniversary edition by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Use the interactive map to limit by region and/or date.

Inequality in Fiscal Policy – The book delves into this discussion by analyzing fiscal policy and its link with inequality. Fiscal policy is the government’s most powerful tool for addressing inequality. It affects households ‘consumption directly (through taxes and transfers) and indirectly (via incentives for work and production and the provision of public goods and individual services such as education and health). An important message of the book is that growth and equity are not necessarily at odds; with the appropriate mix of policy instruments and careful policy design, countries can in many cases achieve better distributional outcomes and improve economic efficiency.

Financial Development, Inequality, and Poverty: Some International Evidence – This paper provides evidence on the link between financial development and income distribution. Several dimensions of financial development are considered: financial access, efficiency, stability, and liberalization.

To investigate more IMF resources from UBC Library, go to IMF eLibrary and IMF eLibrary Data.

For research help using the IMF sources or for general research support, call us at (604) 822-2725, email hssd.library@ubc.ca, or drop by Koerner Library Research Help Desk.

* Inclusion and Economic Inequality IMF site


This session is appropriate for students conducting literature reviews in any discipline.
Topics include
… what is a literature review?
… finding the right databases
… search strategies for databases
… finding scholarly articles, theses and dissertations, books, and more
… resources to help you keep track of your research.
There will be plenty of hands-on time for searching, and assistance from the two presenting librarians.

 

 

Claes Van Visscher. London Bridge. (1616)

Many children’s nursery rhymes have a long and at least partially recorded history. For example, English-speaking children and adults have been singing “London Bridge is Falling Down” since before the first known written version in 1744.*

Two important scholars and collectors of children’s rhymes, Iona and Peter Opie, published many collections and annotated compilations of children’s games, rhymes, chants, playground games and stories.  Their personal collection of 22,000 items is now in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University.

Part of that extraordinary collection is available at UBC Library on microfiche. Unit 1 and Unit 2 , “Stories pre-1850″, are available at Koerner Library, Level 2. Microforms may be read, printed or saved to a flash drive. Reference and Microform open hours.

Koerner Library Microform Hours   |     Information about Microforms

* Opie, Iona Archibald, and Peter Opie. The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.*

Opie Collection on Microfilm, Units 1 and 2
Opie Collection of Children’s Literature: a guide to the microfiche collection

Image Credit: Claes Van Visscher, London Bridge (1616)

 

 

 

 


Census GIS is the topic for this month’s GIS Users Group meeting.  Tom Brittnacher, the GIS Librarian, will be talking about how to get census data and geographic boundaries out of SimplyMap and Abacus, and into GIS.

Wednesday, March 28
3:00 – 4:00 PM
Koerner Library, Level 2, Room 216

JSTOR, a key resource in humanities and social sciences, offers short training videos on a number of topics, including advanced search techniques and how to set up alerts for new articles in your area(s) of interest. Most videos are fewer than 5 minutes long. Frequent JSTOR users should definitely have a look.

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