Public Knowledge Project

 

UBC Library is playing a pivotal role in improving the quality and reach of scholarly publishing, serving as one of six development partners in the Public Knowledge Project, a not-for-profit multi-university initiative that develops (free) open source software and services to make open access a viable option for journals.

Founded in 1998 and currently based out of Simon Fraser University, the Public Knowledge Project is perhaps best known for its Open Journal Systems (OJS) software, currently used to publish over 10,000 open access journals around the world. The free journal management and publishing system assists with every stage of the refereed publishing process, from submissions through to online publication and indexing. The project is supported by a group of librarians, scholars and developers in various capacities at a number of universities worldwide. 

“We feel the work PKP does is so important, that it is worth investing both our money and our time,” says Bronwen Sprout, Head, Digital Programs and Services at UBC Library who serves as PKP Preservation Network (PKP PN) Coordinator, providing guidance and leadership relating to PKP’s digital preservation service for OJS journals. The PKP Preservation Network is a critical complement to the OJS software that works with a network of partners to create a “dark archive” of journals distributed across the globe. In order to ensure that journals preserved in the network are available to the reading public long after their original website is gone, a network of eight partners stores identical copies of each issue, mitigating against loss from natural disaster or human activity.

A critical platform in open scholarly communications infrastructure.

In addition to OJS, PKP develops Open Monograph Press, a management system for peer-reviewed scholarly monographs, the Open Conference system, a free online publishing tool that allows researchers to host conference websites, manage submissions and post conference proceedings, and Open Harvester Systems, a free metadata system that allows researchers to create searchable online databases. PKP also supports research that explores broader areas of scholarly communications and training services to help new publishers build their skills and knowledge in the PKP software.

Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital programs and services at UBC Library, chairs the PKP Advisory Committee, which oversees the project’s finances and strategic directions. “What started out as a small research project at UBC has grown into one of the most important platforms in the international, open scholarly communications infrastructure.  As a non-profit, university based academic-led project, PKP needs to demonstrate that it operates efficiently, effectively and responsibly, and the Advisory Committee ensures that happens.”

The Public Knowledge Project was most recently awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award, part of the Open Publishing Awards at #Force2019.

Learn more about the Public Knowledge Project.

This project is part of UBC Library’s strategic direction to advance research, learning and scholarship.

Learn more about our Strategic Framework.

This year’s Fall UBC Library and Alma Mater Student Society (AMS) Food for Fines Campaign raised a total of $6,942.00 across the Point Grey and Okanagan campuses.

Now in its sixteenth consecutive year at UBC, the Food for Fines campaign waives $3 in Library fines for every food item donated, to a maximum of $60. The program began as a joint initiative to support disadvantaged members of the community, and has become an integral source of the AMS Food Bank’s food reserves to support UBC students in need.

Non-perishable food items were collected at circulation desks and then distributed to the AMS Food Bank.

Thank you to everyone who participated in this year’s campaign!

Please note that members of the community are welcome to donate goods year-round at the AMS Food Bank and Greater Vancouver Food Bank.

Visit the AMS Food Bank website for more information

TDM Seminar Promo Image

UBC Library has organized two speakers for a seminar to discuss Text and Data Mining (TDM) of Library Licensed Electronic Resources. This event will be moderated by Sheldon Armstrong, Associate University Librarian, Collections.

Speakers and topics:

  • UBC Counsel Michael Serebriakov will discuss the various aspects involved in negotiating TDM rights in Library licensed electronic resources. He will also incorporate into the discussion the role of Canadian Copyright vs contract law.
  • UBC Digital Scholarship Librarian, Ekatarina (Eka) Grguric, will present the UBC Library’s Research Guide to help UBC Researchers navigate how to perform TDM on Library licensed electronic resources. The Guide acts as a central list detailing resources where and how TDM can be performed, and maintains up to date contact information for support services.

Learn more about the seminar

  • Date: Thursday, November 28
  • Time: 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m
  • Location: Presentation Room, Research Commons, Level 5, Koerner Library
The exhibit, located in the David Lam Management Research Library and Level 2 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre runs until the end of the year.
Without the Library is a student profile series, that welcomes the unique stories of UBC students and showcases how the Library helps shape their academic success and campus experience.

 

UBC Library’s Scholarly Communications & Copyright office is now offering a new service to help UBC Vancouver instructors clear copyrighted course and teaching materials quickly and easily.

The syllabus service allows for instructors to upload course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR) which is integrated with the Canvas Learning Management Platform and ensures that materials conform with Canadian copyright law and existing UBC license agreements and policies.

The service was introduced to help UBC Vancouver faculty meet Canadian copyright law and Fair Dealing Requirements. Any distribution of published works to students that infringes on copyright can expose both faculty and the University to legal jeopardy. The library’s goal is to make copyright compliance as streamlined and easy for UBC faculty as possible.

“We continue to take every possible step to support faculty in their teaching efforts, and ensure they remain knowledgeable and compliant with Canadian copyright law,” says Allan Bell, Associate University Librarian, Digital Programs and Services.

The service, which launched in August 2019, is already seeing significant use. “I believe this service will be very useful for everyone teaching courses at UBC,” says Christina Hendricks, Academic Director at the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology, “It is an incredibly convenient way to ensure students get easy access to course materials available through the Library.”

A similar service, Mediated Course Reserves at UBCO, has been available to Faculty at UBCO since April 2018. The service connects faculty directly with librarians on the Okanagan campus, enabling them to submit class reading lists through a simple online form. “This service is really about helping faculty get this part of their teaching streamlined, says Kim Buschert, Faculty of Management Librarian at UBCO, “We see a lot of benefit there.”  Faculty at UBCO will soon be able to upload course readings/syllabi directly into the Library Online Course Reserves system (LOCR) integrated with Canvas.

Learn more about the Syllabus Service and processing timelines at UBC Vancouver.

Questions? Contact permissions.office@ubc.ca.

Learn more about Mediated Couse Reserves at UBCO.

Experience history at the tip of your pencil crayons with our new 'Maps and Landscapes' themed digital colouring book series.

 

Reduce your UBC Library fines by donating non-perishable food items – $3 in fines paid for each food item donated (up to a maximum of $60). Donated cans are accepted at branch circulation desks from October 28 to November 12, 2019.

All donations go to the UBC AMS Food Bank on Campus and the Greater Vancouver Food Bank which provide food relief for students in need, including non-perishable foods, supplies and information about additional resources on- and off-campus.

 

UBC Library’s Seed Lending Library is helping to build community and foster lifelong, home-grown learning both on and off campus.

Established in 2017 by Reference Librarian Helen Brown and Education Librarian Wendy Traas with the help of a UTown@UBC grant, the Seed Lending Library allows anyone to “borrow” seeds free of charge from two library locations on the Vancouver campus, the Woodward and Education libraries. Members can borrow a variety of high-quality vegetable, herb, and flower seeds that are well-suited to local growing conditions and later, as the summer gardening season comes to a close, they are encouraged to return seeds from their crop to the library to promote local seed sharing.

One of the Seed Lending Library’s early adopters, Lisa Zhu discovered the resource while studying in the Education Library as a student and has been delighted at how much the library has allowed her to experiment with her community garden plot in East Vancouver. “Being an avid gardener, it has been a great way for me to try new varieties of plants,” Zhu explains, “I don’t have to buy the seeds, I can just borrow them so it’s super low-barrier and low-risk.” This year, among other vegetables, Zhu is growing swiss chard, kale, beans and several varieties of tomatoes.

Lending Library sees significant growth in use

The Seed Lending Library has seen significant growth in use and popularity since its establishment in 2017. In 2018, the library saw a 240% increase in borrowing year-over-year and a huge increase in seed donations after the 2018 seed saving season.  Zhu isn’t surprised by its popularity, “I feel like right now in Vancouver, there are a lot of people who are super interested in local food, food security and want to grow their own food.”

Collection contributes to research and learning

For Dr. Susan Gerofsky, Professor of Curriculum and Pedagogy in the Department of Education whose work focuses on mathematics education and environmental education, the Seed Lending Library has been critical to her work in UBC’s Orchard Garden. Gerofsky saw the potential of the garden to become a place where teacher candidates could get experience teaching in outdoor classroom spaces, “There was really nowhere for teacher candidates to get hands-on experience in creating a school garden and stewarding it or in teaching their curricular subjects with the garden as a co-teacher,” she explains. Today, the garden hosts 25 teacher candidates every year during their 3-week Community Field Experience, eight Saturday workshops between October and June and several Summer Institutes. Work in the garden is also generating research, with more than a dozen Master’s theses, PhD dissertations and graduation projects based in the garden.

Carrots grown in the Orchard Garden. Photo credit: Susan Gerofsky.

About 50% of the seeds used in the Orchard Garden are borrowed from the Seed Lending Library. “We bring students to the Seed Lending Library to introduce the idea of the sharing economy as well as why it’s important to let some plants go to seed,” says Gerofsky, “We see this collection as very much in the same spirit as the Orchard Garden. It’s about building community and sharing resources; where you might have thought there was scarcity, there’s really abundance.”

The Seed Lending Library is just one of the many ways that UBC Library is actively fostering opportunities for meaningful engagement and knowledge exchange with campus and community members. Says Education Librarian Wendy Traas, “It is really exciting to see how inviting this non-traditional library collection has been to a variety of community members. Local residents have used it as a way of learning in the garden as a family, and teacher education students have borrowed seeds to support experiential, outdoor learning. The Education Library also has a great collection picture books and teaching resources, so it’s a one-stop shop for all ages to learn about plants, gardening, lifecycles, and more.”

Learn more about the Seed Lending Library.

UBC Library’s Rare Books & Special Collections, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, The Vancouver Asian Heritage Month Society and the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop have collaborated to present an exhibition that captures the continual impact of iconic Asian Canadian Jim Wong-Chu.

The exhibit runs October 10 to November 15 on Level 2 of the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, located on the UBC Vancouver campus.

Jim Wong-Chu (1945- July-11-2017) was a well-known Asian-Canadian historian, editor, author, and poet. Born in Hong Kong, Wong-Chu came to Canada in 1953. He attended the Vancouver School of Art (Emily Carr University of Art + Design) from 1975-1981, majoring in photography and design. From 1976-1981, Wong-Chu was involved with the Vancouver Co-op Radio Program on culture and assimilation, Pender Guy Radio Program while working at the Vancouver School of Art.

Considered one of the first Asian-Canadian authors who gave voice to the Asian Communities in the times when the support for the Asian arts was difficult to obtain. Jim Wong-Chu dedicated much of his time to compile a literary anthology, “Many Mouthed Birds” to showcase the richness of Asian-Canadian literature. During 1995 and 1996 Jim Wong-Chu co-founded the Asian Canadian Performing Arts Resource (ACPAR) and became one of the founders of the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop (ACWW) where he helped many young Asian-Canadian writers to succeed by editing and finding publishers for their works. Jim Wong-Chu along with Mishtu Banerjee, Mo-Ling Chui, Grace Eiko Thomson, and Winston Xin​ formed the Vancouver Asian Heritage Month Society, as an organization that endeavoured to explore the diversity of Asian Canadian life and culture and promote the discussion of relevant issues and concerns within and beyond the Asian Canadian communities.

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