Learn a step-by-step approach to identify databases, primary sources and other research tools and then to perform comprehensive searches and keep track of what you’ve found.

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012
1:00PM – 3:30PM
Koerner Library, Room 216
Bring your own laptop
Register online at http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/2832

 

Save valuable research time! Online research resources offer an array of tools to help you stay current in your field. In this workshop you’ll learn how to set up email alerts and RSS feeds to:

  • be notified when new articles and dissertations are published on your topic
  • receive Table of Contents for the latest issue of your favorite journal
  • find out when new books in your discipline have arrived in the library
  • be notified of funding and upcoming conference opportunities
  • follow news stories and blogsNo matter what your discipline, you’ll leave the session having set up a number of alerts to stay up-to-date with your research interests!

Date: Thursday, January 26th, 2012 at 12:00pm – 1:30pm
Location:
Koerner Library, Rm 216
Registration:
http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/2829

Bodenhamer, David J., John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.

From the publisher’s description:

The Spatial Humanities aims to re-orient—and perhaps revolutionize—humanities scholarship by critically engaging the technology and specifically directing it to the subject matter of the humanities. To this end, the contributors explore the potential of spatial methods such as text-based geographical analysis, multimedia GIS, animated maps, deep contingency, deep mapping, and the geo-spatial semantic web.

Browse a Google Preview of The Spatial Humanities here.

Image: Inuktituk Dialect Map , created by Asybaris01

 

The Public Policy Group and the Impact of Social Sciences blog  at  the London School of Economics have produced a guide to “show academics and researchers how to get the most out of [Twitter] the micro-blogging site. The guide is designed to lead the novice through the basics of Twitter but also provide tips on how it can aid the teaching and research of the more experienced academic tweeter.”

Amy Mollett, Danielle Moran and Patrick Dunleavy. Using Twitter in University Research, Teaching and Impact Activities: a guide for academics and researchers. LSE Public Policy Group, 2011

 

If you’ve ever wondered about the future of the book, have a look at these:

Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life — with life understood both philosophically and biologically — which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. Produced by a globally-distributed network of writers and editors, the books in the series repackage existing open access science research by clustering it around selected topics whose unifying theme is life: e.g., air, agriculture, bioethics, cosmetic surgery, electronic waste, energy, neurology and pharmacology.”  (from Living Books About Life)

Cover photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/simonwheatley/5128638903/ under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ license.

 

 

 

To celebrate the 2011 release of Beaujolais Nouveau, we’re featuring a link to Metro Wine Map of France (opens in new window) designed by Dr. David Gissen as a wonderful example of mapping and data visualization.

To learn more about geographic information, see GIS Services, a part of Humanities and Social Sciences Division at Koerner Library.

 

Photo credit: Sergei Melkonov at flickr

 

 

Crowd on Canada DayNoon-Hour Intro to RefWorks Workshop
Tuesday, November 1st, 2011 at 12:00PM – 1:00PM
Woodward Biomedical Library: Teaching Lab – Room B25

Finding and Using Data from the Census of Canada
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011 at 10:00AM – 11:45AM
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre: Room 318 – Library Computer Lab

Photo: Winston Wong

“History Unmasked with GIS: Politics and agriculture in Victorian Britain” is the topic for October’s GIS Users Group, presented by Stephen Peplow.  Stephen is a PhD candidate in Land and Food Systems.  His research includes a fascinating use of GIS and spatial analysis to study 19th century Britain.

Please note DIFFERENT DAY AND TIME:
Tuesday, October 25
3:00pm
Koerner Library Level 2, Room 216

All are welcome to attend.

Koerner Library is offering three workshops over the next month especially for undergraduates in humanities and social sciences.  Currently, we’re offering two sessions of each: one in the computer lab in Koerner Library and one online.  Full details and registration here.

Introduction to the Library for Humanities and Social Sciences Students

  • Sept 20th at noon       online
  • Sept 27th at 10 am     Koerner 217

Introduction to Library Databases for Humanities and Social Sciences Students

  • Sept 28th at noon        online
  • Oct 5th at 4 pm           Koerner 217

Introduction to Refworks, Zotero and Mendeley for Humanities and Social Sciences Students|

  • Oct 13th at 4 pm        Koerner 217
  • Oct 19th at  noon       online

 

 

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet