Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing.

People with mental illness and substance use challenges are among the most stigmatized population in the world. The field of neuroscience is making strides to redress this by changing the etiological paradigm from a pejorative behavior model to one that is brain based. Evidence from neuroscience serves as a powerful agent for challenging problematic beliefs and attitudes held by healthcare providers and society. Translating this evidence to current and future healthcare providers, to patients and the public, will contribute to breaking down barriers that prevent persons experiencing these challenges from seeking and utilizing treatment.

Bio: Deborah Finnell has specialized in mental health and addictions for most her nursing career. From her grounding as a registered nurse working in inpatient psychiatry, she expanded her role to that of a clinical nurse specialist and then a nurse practitioner. She brings her passion for the neurobiological bases of mental illness and substance use to her clinical practice, teaching, research, and policy/advocacy work. With funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Dr. Finnell led the integration of substance-use related content including screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) into the nursing curricula at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. She advocates for expanded access to mental illness and substance use treatment, such as calling for advanced practice nurses to prescribe buprenorphine. During her tenure with the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Hospital Administration, she conducted funded research focusing on improving the health of Veterans with mental and substance use disorders. Her professional leadership roles range from past chair of the New York State Peer Assistance Committee to past president of the International Nurses Society on Addictions. She served as chair of the Addictions Nursing Certification Board and was a member of the Committee on Nursing Standards for the American Nurses Association. She currently serves on the board of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) and is associate editor of that organization’s professional journal, Substance Abuse.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Carey, M. G., Al-Zaiti, S. S., Dean, G. E., Sessanna, L., & Finnell, D. S. (2011). Sleep problems, depression, substance use, social bonding, and quality of life in professional firefighters. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(8), 928-933. [Link]

Crickman, R., & Finnell, D. (2016;2015;). Systematic review of control measures to reduce hazardous drug exposure for health care workers. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 31(2), 183-190. [Link]

Sanchez, M., & Finnell, D. (2017). Alcohol screening and brief intervention for persons living with HIV. Janac-Journal of the Association of Nurses in Aids Care, 28(2), 266-278. [Link]


As part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, a myriad of scholars from a wide variety of disciplines discuss the topic of advancing health and inclusion.


Speakers

Laura Bulk (Rehabilitation Science) is part of the Being Blind team, working to expose misperceptions about what it means to be Blind, and to create an engaging campaign challenging such misperceptions.

Bulmaro Valdes (Biomedical Engineering) applies his science and engineering knowledge to help people with disabilities. He works directly with stroke survivors and therapists to develop new technological solutions to current rehabilitation issues.

Beth Clark (Interdisciplinary Studies) focuses on how transgender youth, their parents, caregivers, and health care providers can work together to make health care decisions that support trans youth well-being.

Stephanie Glegg (Rehabilitation Science) examines how relationships support/hinder evidence uptake in healthcare. By targeting the social influences that drive evidence use, she aims to improve patients’ timely access to healthcare innovations.

Aarthi Gobinath (Neuroscience) works on treating postpartum depression, investigating how different types of maternal antidepressant exposure affect the neurobiology of mothers and the male and female offspring in adulthood.

Celestin Hategeka (Population and Public Health) evaluates the effectiveness and implementation of a multifaceted quality improvement intervention (ETAT+) in Rwanda to improve quality of hospital care for newborns and children.

Jaime Semchuk (Educational and Counselling Psychology) collaborates with high schools in BC to adapt, implement, and evaluate mental health literacy interventions with an aim to build capacity for promoting student wellbeing, reducing stigma, and effectively supporting students who experience mental health difficulties.

Evan Taylor (Language and Literacy Education) is a health literacy researcher and advocate whose work focuses on trans* and gender nonconforming people’s experiences of cancer and health decision-making.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bulk, L. et al. (2017). ‘We are not anything alike’: marginalization of health professionals with disabilities. Disability & Society. [Link]

Bulk, L., Glegg, S. et al. (2015). The legitimization process of students with disabilities in health and human service educational programs in Canada. Disability & Society. [Link]

Valdes, B. et al. (2016). Kinecting the moves: The kinematic potential of rehabilitation-specific gaming to inform treatment for hemiparesis. International Journal of Child Health and Human Development. [Link]

Clark, B. et al. (2017). “I would have preferred more options”: Accounting for non‐binary youth in health research. Nursing Inquiry. [Link]

Glegg, S., Livingstone, R., & Montgomery, I. (2016).Facilitating interprofessional evidence-based practice in paediatric rehabilitation: Development, implementation and evaluation of an online toolkit for health professionals. Disability and Rehabilitation. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Choleris, E., & Galea, L. A. M. (2017). Sex, hormones, and genotype interact to influence psychiatric disease, treatment, and behavioral research: Sex, hormones, and genotype in behavioral research. Journal of Neuroscience Research. [Link]

Gobinath, A. R., Mahmoud, R., & Galea, L. A. M. (2014). Influence of sex and stress exposure across the lifespan on endophenotypes of depression: Focus on behavior, glucocorticoids, and hippocampus. Frontiers in Neuroscience. [Link]

Hategeka, C., Mwai, L., & Tuyisenge, L. (2017).Implementing the emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care (ETAT+) clinical practice guidelines to improve quality of hospital care in rwandan district hospitals: Healthcare workers’ perspectives on relevance and challenges. [Link]

Hategeka, C., et al. (2017). Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda. Plos One. [Link]

Semchuk, J. (2016). Adolescent experiences of seeking and receiving support at school for significant mental health concerns. [Link]

Taylor, E. T. (2013). Transmen’s health care experiences: Ethical social work practice beyond the binary. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services. [Link]

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC School of Nursing as part of the Marion Woodward Lecture. Professor John Keady will share the intervention work that he is leading with an interdisciplinary Dementia and Ageing Research Team [DART] based at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at the University of Manchester. DART have developed programs of work based around creative social research methods and the joint creation of knowledge with people living with dementia and their family/social networks.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Keady, a Nursing Professor of Older People’s Mental Health at the University of Manchester, is also the Chief Investigator of the five-year ESRC/NIHR Neighbourhoods and Dementia mixed methods, multi-site, research study [2014-2019] which is funded as part of the UK Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia. The Neighbourhoods Study includes a program of work located at the Center for Dementia Research at Linköping University, Sweden. An overview of the Neighbourhoods Study will be shared and will include a focus on the role that people with dementia are playing on the research program. His presentation will conclude with locating neighbourhoods within the wider context of the dementia friendly community movement and the role of nursing in transforming approaches to care through the personal empowerment of people living with dementia.

the-riverview-hospital-suitcase-project

The UBC School of Nursing Consortium for Nursing History Inquiry presents the Health History Lecture and display on Mental Health Legacies: The Riverview Hospital Suitcase Project.

The project is created to honor the legacies of two women whose lives were impacted by mental illness. It tells of their individual journeys and of the effects of mental illness on their lives, families, and relationships from the mid-1940’s to the mid-1960’s. All are welcome to attend as Anna Tremere presents the project on January 10 in the School of Nursing. It will also be displayed in the School of Nursing from January 10 to February 28.

Anna Tremere is the RPN and President of Riverview Hospital Historical Society.


Lecture Details

Where: UBC School of Nursing Room T206

When: January 10, 12:00

All are welcome; No RSVP

Display Details

Where: UBC School of Nursing Main Hallway across from T201

When: January 10-February 28, 2017


Co-Sponsors: UBC School of Nursing, UBC Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (Recording and Webcast), City of Coquitlam Archives

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Presented by UBC Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, and Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, in partnership with alumni UBC

The sequencing of the human genome has been hailed as a scientific breakthrough in that it has opened the human genetic blueprint to investigations of all questions ranging from human origins to the understanding of health and complex diseases.  As a result of this revolutionary sequencing of human genomes, our knowledge about how and why we differ from each other as well as how interactions between genes and culture have shaped our community is now more clearly understood. How can this knowledge be used to improve human health through disease prevention, diagnosis and personalized treatment approaches? What does the Genomics Revolution mean for you and your health? What is the potential for future generations?

Join UBC’s Faculties of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in partnership with alumni UBC, to hear from five top UBC researchers and learn about the work they are doing to accelerate the genomics revolution which is advancing their fields.

 


Moderator

Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa

Panelists & Talks

Dr. Jehannine Austin – Genetic counseling: the key to unlocking the potential health and economic benefits of human genomics?

Dr. Martin Dawes – It is not just the genetics that is difficult – the translation to everyday practice is really hard.

Dr. Howard Lim – Personalized Care in Oncology – Pitfalls and Successes

Dr. Corey Nislow – Only in the Light of Evolution: Cells, Organisms, and Pharmacology

Dr. Chris Overall – Can Proteomics Fill the Gap between Genomics and Phenotypes? The Human Proteome Project.


Speaker Biographies

Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa

Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Sectors, Genome BC

catalina-lopez-correa-320x486In January 2016, Dr. Catalina Lopez-Correa joined Genome BC as Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Sectors. With over 18 years of international experience in both the academic and private sectors, Dr. Lopez-Correa brings her deep understanding of genomics to the Genome BC leadership team.

Dr. Lopez-Correa holds an MD from UPB University in Colombia, a Masters in Genetics from Paris VII/Pasteur Institute and a PhD in Medical Biosciences-Genetics from KULeuven in Belgium. Most recently she was the Vice-President and CSO, Scientific Affairs, at Genome Quebec where she was instrumental in developing competitive teams for national and provincial research projects, and raising the profile of Genome Quebec on the global stage.

Previous experience also includes a role as Senior Scientist with Eli Lilly and Company. During Dr. Lopez-Correa’s time at Eli Lilly, she was part of the Pharmacogenomics and Translational Medicine Group in charge of discovering and validating genetic/genomic biomarkers in different therapeutic areas (oncology, cardio-metabolic and neurosciences). She also helped develop the company’s tailored therapeutics and personalized medicine strategy.  Dr. Lopez-Correa also held the position of Head of Cytogenomics laboratory at deCODE genetics where she developed screening strategies to detect genomic rearrangements. She has also worked for two different American biotech companies in the UK (Genomica and Informax).

Since 2002, Dr. Lopez-Correa has served as evaluator for large multinational projects funded by the European Commission, the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiatives) and the NIH and has been recognized by several awards nationally and internationally. As part of her commitment to international development, Dr. Lopez-Correa funded the not for profit organization ODNS (Organisation pour le Développement avec des Nouvelles Solidarités) in 2012 and has been involved in several initiatives aimed at demonstrating the impact of genomics in developing countries.

Dr. Jehannine Austin

Associate Professor, UBC Department of Medical Genetics; Canada Research Chair in Translational Psychiatric Genomics; Acting Head, Department of Psychiatry, UBC Faculty of Medicine

 

Genetic counseling: the key to unlocking the potential health and economic benefits of human genomics?

The conditions that are most common in humans (e.g. cancer, psychiatric illness, diabetes, heart disease) are complex – that is,jehannine-austin-320x214 they arise as a result of interactions between genetic and environmental influences. Lifestyle modifications (e.g. quitting smoking, exercise, nutrition) can reduce the risk for these conditions, but studies show that providing people with information about their genetic risk does not reliably provoke adoption of healthy behaviours that can reduce risk. This talk will focus on the role of genetic counseling in personalized prevention approaches to common complex disease by empowering people to act on genomic risk information to engage in risk reduction behaviours.

BIO: Jehannine completed her BSc (Hons, Biochemistry) at Bath University, and her PhD in Neuropsychiatric Genetics at the University of Wales College of Medicine in the UK before completing training as a Genetic Counselor at UBC in 2003. She was first appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry in 2007, and in the Department of Medical Genetics in 2008, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2012.

She holds/has held multiple external salary awards including a CIHR New Investigator Award, a Michael Smith Career Investigator Award, and a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair, and received CIHR’s 2007 Maud Menten New Investigator Award. She is co-author of the book “How to talk with families about genetics and psychiatric illness” (W.W Norton, 2011), Graduate Advisor to the UBC Genetic Counseling program, and a Board Certified Genetic Counselor.

Dr. Martin Dawes

Director & Co-Founder, Personalized Medicine Institute; Head, Family Practice, UBC Faculty of Medicine

It is not just the genetics that is difficult – the translation to everyday practice is really hard.

martin-dawes-320x386There is a journey of using genetic tests to avoid adverse reactions to drugs used commonly in Family Practice. More than half consultations in Family Practice involve complex decisions about medication, adding a genetic test makes things more complex. Dr Dawes and his team had to go back to the drawing board and rediscover how to help patients and professionals identify the safe effective drugs for the individual person.

BIO: Dr. Dawes is the Head of the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC), and Cofounder of the Personalized Medicine Institute. He started his clinical practice as a family physician in Oxford. Following the completion of his PhD in 1992, he helped develop a Master’s program in Evidence Based Health Care, which allows clinicians to engage in research. He has directed the UK Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in Oxford and was the head of family practice at McGill University before coming to UBC in 2010. His research includes genomics in primary care and lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes.

Dr. Dawes is currently leading a new research project entitled “The Implementation of Pharmacogenomics in Primary Care in British Columbia”. This novel project is valued at over $720,000, and is being funded through Genome BC’s User Partnership Program, Rx&D’s Health Research Foundation and other partners. The project will also link in with TELUS Health, the largest electronic medical record (EMR) vendor in Canada.

Dr. Howard Lim

Medical Oncologist, BC Cancer Agency; Clinical Physician Professor, Medical Oncology Division, UBC Faculty of Medicine

Personalized Care in Oncology – Pitfalls and Successes

The use of whole genome sequencing technology to understand tumor biology can be used in the hopes of finding actionable howard-lim-320x480targets for patients with cancer.  Dr Lim will provide an overview about how the use of this information can lead to success and how we can learn from the failures.

BIO: Lim is a Medical Oncologist at the BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Centre, specializing in Gastrointestinal Cancer. He is the Program Director of the Medical Oncology Training Program and is the Chair of the GI Tumor Group.

Dr Lim is also an active member of the GI Outcomes Unit, and the Personalized Onco-genomics Program – a clinical research initiative that’s embedding genomic sequencing into the diagnostic and treatment planning for patients with incurable cancers.

Prior to going to medical school, he was fortunate to do research at the BC Cancer Agency Research Centre under Dr. Marcel Bally, in the Department of Advanced Therapeutics. One of the great things that he witnessed was how research could be translated over to patient care seamlessly.

Dr. Lim completed his training in Medical Oncology at the BC Cancer Agency and then did additional training in Gastrointestinal Malignancies at the Oregon Health Sciences University, before coming to the BC Cancer Agency in 2008.

Dr. Corey Nislow

Associate Professor, UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Only in the Light of Evolution: Cells, Organisms, and Pharmacology

corey-nislow-320x480At its core, all of biology can be considered a combination of the forces of natural selection, organism fitness and the extraordinary results required to meet these two challenges. For the past two decades Dr. Nislow’s lab has sought to understand how genotype is revealed in phenotype; by using diverse models from yeast to man and every environment imaginable. This talk will describe the lessons we have learned from such models and how we are applying them to patients.

BIO: Dr. Corey Nislow’s laboratory uses cutting edge tools to address this central question: how can we understand the biological commonalities in all of the life sciences; from embryonic development, to the spread of infectious diseases to better ways to treat cancer. Each of these disciplines, and in fact all of biology, can be explained in the context of competition, interaction and evolution. Therefore his lab studies the interface between genes and the environment using parallel genome-wide screens, high throughput cell-based assays and next generation sequencing of microbial and human populations. He and his scientific partner, Dr. Guri Giaever shift between model systems to understand how genes and drugs interact during normal and pathological states. Most recently, his lab is exploring how laboratory experiments can co-opt evolutionary processes to understand drug action.

He enjoys teaching all aspects of biotechnology, genomics and drug discovery for undergraduate and graduate students. Corey completed a BA in developmental biology at New College and a PhD in cell and molecular biology at the University of Colorado. He was also an American Cancer Society postdoctoral fellow. He led discovery teams at two biotechnology companies (MJ Research and Cytokinetics Inc., in the San Francisco Bay Area) and at Stanford University. Prior to joining UBC, he was associate professor at the University of Toronto and director of the Donnelly Sequencing Centre.

Dr. Chris Overall

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair, Protease Proteomics & Systems Biology; Professor, UBC Faculty of Dentistry

Can Proteomics Fill the Gap between Genomics and Phenotypes? The Human Proteome Project.

How can only 20,061 human genes encode the complexity of humans when similar numbers of similar genes also encode worms chris-overall-320x480and flys? Mapping and sequencing genes is just the start of this answer. Genes encode proteins and it is proteins that are responsible for forming the cells and tissues of humans. Further, proteins orchestrate the complexity of coordinated signaling between cells and organs that keep us healthy. Dr. Overall will discuss the huge diversity of protein forms, now known as “proteoforms”, and how they lead to the incredible complexity of human cells and tissues. It is through understanding proteoforms that disease mechanisms can be deciphered, new drug targets validated, and accurate diagnostic tests devised that will lead to new medical interventions to treat disease early. By reducing disease and its detrimental outcomes, proteomic biomarkers hold enormous promise to revolutionize diagnostics and personalized medicine ensuring sustainable health care costs.

BIO: Proteases are nature’s biological molecular scissors. Being involved in the fate of every protein—from protein synthesis and maturation, to function changing adaptations in response to changing needs of tissues and cells, and finally in protein removal, proteases are essential to maintaining healthy cells and tissues. Yet, with the good comes the bad. Proteases can dramatically worsen disease and cause tissue destruction leading to disability, pain and death in some diseases like cancer. Thus, Dr. Overall has a long-standing fascination in proteases from his undergraduate days to now. Indeed, he is a Professor and Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Protease Proteomics and Systems Biology and holds a seven-year $5.55M CIHR Foundation Grant to investigate proteases.

Dr. Overall completed his undergraduate BDS, Honors Science and Masters degrees at the University of Adelaide, South Australia; his Ph.D. in Biochemistry at the University of Toronto; and was a MRC Centennial Fellow in his post-doctoral work with Dr. Michael Smith, UBC, learning protein engineering. On Sabbaticals in 1997-1998 he was a Visiting Senior Scientist at British Biotech Pharmaceuticals, Oxford, UK; and again in 2004/2008 he was a Visiting Senior Scientist at the Expert Protease Platform, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Basel, Switzerland; and in 2010-2012 was an External Senior Fellow and is now an Honorary Professor, at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, Albert-Ludwigs Universität Freiburg, Germany.

With over 15,500 citations for his 237 papers he has an h index of 67 and this has been recognized by numerous awards including the 2002 CIHR Scientist of the Year, the UBC Killam Senior Researcher Award (Science) 2005, and several life time achievement awards. He was the Chair of the 2003 Matrix Metalloproteinase Gordon Research Conference and the 2010 Protease Gordon Research Conference. More recently his interests are evolving to deciphering immune deficiencies and chronic inflammatory diseases by the use of proteomics and degradomics, a term he coined. He was elected as Co-Chair of the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Chromosome–Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) in 2014 and was recently elected in 2016 to the Executive Committee of HUPO.


Click here to register for this event online. Click here for the event details. Questions? Please contact Sarah Irwin, Alumni Engagement Manager, UBC Medicine at sarah.irwin@ubc.ca or 604-875-4111 x67741.

medtalk sponsors

 

Personal Health Data Sharing for Personalized Medicine:
Facts, Opportunities, Security and Ethics

Leaders come together for conversations about types of personal health data, opportunities that arise from integrating these data for health and economic benefits, and issues in secure and ethical storage and sharing of these data.

 ‘Conversationists’

  • Dr Elodie Portales-Casamar, Clinical Informatics Specialist, Child & Family Research Institute
  • Dr Nancy Meagher, Executive Director, Population Data BC
  • Dr Larry Lynd, Professor, UBC Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE)
  • Dr Zsuzsanna Hollander, PROOF Centre
  • Dr Paul Terry, President & CEO, PHEMI Health Systems Inc.
  • Dr Alice Virani, Clinical Ethicist, Children’s and Women’s Hospital of BC

Moderator:
Dr. Jehannine Austin – Associate Professor, UBC Psychiatry/Medical Genetics

Discussion Document: Roadmap for Bringing Personalized Medicine to British Columbians available for download here {PDF} for those interested. Not required reading for Public Talks attendance.


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