This talk is an informal and open forum that aims to bring the latest and greatest ideas in the area of the Life Sciences to the public. Each event is free to attend and will include a talk, networking opportunities and reception. This series focuses on Personalized Medicine and how the Life Sciences Institute faculty, staff and students are working to change clinical practice, improve health outcomes, and reduce health costs.  In partnership with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Health Information Series, an ongoing public lecture series that take place in the Lower Mainland community, this talk will also be recorded for webcast viewing at a later date. 

Moderator

Martin Dawes, MD, PhD
Head, UBC Department of Family Practice

What is personalized medicine?

Pieter Cullis, PhD
Director, UBC Life Sciences Institute; Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

How can we harness knowledge of our molecules?

Bruce McManus, MD, PhD
Professor, UBC Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine; Co-Director, Institute for Heart + Lung Health; CEO, Centre of Excellence for Prevention of Organ Failure (PROOF Centre)

What does my own genome tell me?

Ida Goodreau
Adjunct Professor, UBC Sauder School of Business; Director of Strategy, UBC Centre for Healthcare Management

Is brain failure inevitable?

Teresa Liu-Ambrose, PhD, PT
Associate Professor, UBC Department of Physical Therapy; Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience

Can we move from sick-care to health-care?

Larry Lynd, PhD
Professor, UBC Pharmaceutical Sciences; Director, UBC Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE)


 


Engage in a public dialogue about how environmental, behavioural and biological (including genetic) factors collide and interact to impact the health of British Columbians. People have control over some aspects of their health and not others.

1Please RSVP below

Getting there: Vancouver’s Central Library is located in Library Square which occupies a full city block: bounded by Homer, Hamilton, Robson and Georgia Streets. The Central Library is accessible by bicycle, bus, skytrain and car, with underground and street parking available. The Alice MacKay Room is wheelchair accessible.

This talk is an informal and open forum that aims to bring the latest and greatest ideas in the area of the Life Sciences to the public. Each event is free to attend and will include a talk, networking opportunities and reception. This series focuses on Personalized Medicine and how the Life Sciences Institute faculty, staff and students are working to change clinical practice, improve health outcomes, and reduce health costs.  In partnership with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Health Information Series, an ongoing public lecture series that take place in the Lower Mainland community, this talk will also be recorded for webcast viewing at a later date. 

Moderator

Martin Dawes, MD, PhD
Head, UBC Department of Family Practice

What is personalized medicine?

Pieter Cullis, PhD
Director, UBC Life Sciences Institute; Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

How can we harness knowledge of our molecules?

Bruce McManus, MD, PhD
Professor, UBC Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine; Co-Director, Institute for Heart + Lung Health; CEO, Centre of Excellence for Prevention of Organ Failure (PROOF Centre)

What does my own genome tell me?

Ida Goodreau
Adjunct Professor, UBC Sauder School of Business; Director of Strategy, UBC Centre for Healthcare Management

Is brain failure inevitable?

Teresa Liu-Ambrose, PhD, PT
Associate Professor, UBC Department of Physical Therapy; Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience

Can we move from sick-care to health-care?

Larry Lynd, PhD
Professor, UBC Pharmaceutical Sciences; Director, UBC Collaboration for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE)


 

February 4, 2015, 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Alice MacKay Room, Lower Level
Central Library
350 West Georgia Street


To attend this talk, please RSVP online.


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For more information about this series, please contact Allan Cho, Community Engagement Librarian

VPL-spotlight_v2Our ability to harness the power of the immune system to treat a vast variety of diseases is rapidly advancing. Join the Life Sciences Institute’s Infection, Inflammation & Immunity – I3 – research group leaders for short talks and discussion about the use of the immune system in treating infection, autoimmune disorders and cancer.

This talk is an informal and open forum that aims to bring the latest and greatest ideas in the area of the Life Sciences to the public. Each event is free to attend and will include a talk, networking opportunities and reception. This series focuses on Personalized Medicine and how the Life Sciences Institute faculty, staff and students are working to change clinical practice, improve health outcomes, and reduce health costs.  In partnership with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre’s Health Information Series, an ongoing public lecture series that take place in the Lower Mainland community, this talk will also be recorded for webcast viewing at a later date. 

Panel Topics:

Dr. Georgia Perona-Wright – “Using the immune system to combat infection”

Dr. Ken Harder – “Treating cancer with immunology”

Dr. Marc Horwitz – “Immunotherapies in autoimmunity”

Speakers:

Dr. Georgia Perona-Wright - Dr Perona Wright’s research is on immune responses that can be both protective and pathological.  Her aim is to understand how the balance between these two outcomes is achieved, concentrating on the role of cytokines during infection.  She is particularly interested in the interaction between coincident, opposing cytokines.

Dr. Ken Harder - The long-term goal of the Harder Lab is to identify the key genes and cellular pathways that guide dendritic cell lineage choice and dendritic cell function. We are particularly interested in the role of tyrosine kinase/phosphatase-regulated signalling pathways that control signalling thresholds important for the development and function of DCs. The work utilizes mouse models in which the levels and activities of key signaling molecules have been manipulated allowing the lab to delineate the roles of particular genes or signalling pathways in mammalian dendritic cell biology and in innate/adaptive immunity at the whole animal level.  The lab is using these mouse models to explore the relationship between alterations in DC development/function and host responses to tumours and bacterial or viral pathogens. Ultimately, this research program will lead to the identification of critical proteins and pathways that may become targets of future therapeutic strategies to either augment host-pathogen/tumour responses or alleviate pathological immune responses.

Dr. Marc Horwitz - Dr. Horwitz’s laboratory is interested in identifying, characterizing and determining the mechanisms of viral-induced immune disease in a variety of complex chronic disorders. These include, but are not limited to autoimmune diseases like diabetes, autoimmune myocarditis and multiple sclerosis, immunosuppression induced by viruses such as HIV and Measles, haemorrhagic fevers as observed following Dengue fever virus infection, and meningitis induced by viruses like West Nile Virus.  Specifically, Dr. Horwitz’s primary goal of the program is to interconnect the changes effecting the ability of the immune system to respond to infection with its ability to develop immune dysfunction leading to disease. 


Tuesday, May 27, 2014
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Alma VanDusen & Peter Kaye Rooms, Lower Level
Central Library
350 West Georgia Street


Useful Resources for more information


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For more information about this series, please contact Stefanie Butland, Life Sciences Institute, Lee Ann Bryant, Reference Librarian or Allan Cho, Community Engagement Librarian


Intellectual disabilities are no longer necessarily an unchangeable fate. Today, new tools allow us to diagnose and treat specific genetic conditions that cause developmental delay and intellectual disability, previously thought to be permanent. Individual with intellectual disabilities often develop epilepsy and autism—much of which can now be prevented through life-changing treatments.

Dr. van Karnebeek and her team already successfully identified a number of these defects, developed new treatments and were able to enhance identification of these diseases in BC Children’s Hospital. Over the past 2 years, 400 children with intellectual disability were systematically screened and 5% were identified to have treatable condition; treatment in these cases improved behavior, cognition and often changed the lives of the whole family.  These diagnostic tools – a protocol supported by the Treatable-ID.org App – are now used by physicians around the world, allowing them to recognize diseases in newborns and treat these vulnerable patients before they suffer critical brain damage.

The research of Dr. van Karnebeek, Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and scientist in the Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics (CMMT) at UBC, aims to discover new inborn errors of metabolism, a class of genetic diseases that is particularly amenable to treatment. Her team uses a multidisciplinary approach involving the study of three “-omics” in patients: phenomics, their physical and biochemical properties, genomics, their genetic information, and metabolomics, their metabolite profiles. The Treatable Intellectual Disability Endeavor (TIDE) is a large collaborative effort Dr. van Karnebeek established alongside Sylvia Stockler. Its goal is to harness new technologies for the discovery of genetic defects in children who appear to have intellectual disabilities and to provide clinicians with the tools for early recognition and management.

Speaker Bio
Dr. van Karnebeek is a Certified Pediatrician and Biochemical Geneticist at the BC Children’s Hospital (BCCH). She is currently serving as Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Over the last decade since obtaining her PhD in the genetics of intellectual disability, Dr. van Karnebeek has been actively bridging her clinical work with passion for medical research.

Some of Dr. van Karnebeek’s most significant contributions pertain to innovation of diagnosis and treatment of inborn errors metabolism in intellectual disability patients, and translation into improved outcomes via prevention of brain damage and optimization of neurologic symptoms. Her research has led to the creation and design of the WebAPP www.Treatable-ID.org for handheld devices, which translates the knowledgebase she compiled for a systematic review into a clinical tool which facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of 81 treatable inborn errors of metabolism. As a Co-Principal Investigator with Dr. Sylvia Stockler, Head of the Biochemical Division at BCCH on the Treatable Intellectual Disability Endeavour (TIDE) project, a BCCH Collaborative Area of Innovation Grant, Dr. van Karnebeek successfully led the implementation of the TIDE diagnostic protocol at BCCH. The study identified treatable inborn errors of metabolism in 5% of all intellectual disability patients, and showed reduced time to diagnosis and cost-savings. Working with leading applied genomics and metabolomics researcher, Dr. van Karnebeek’s team is discovering novel gene defects causing intellectual disability which are amenable to treatment, with 5 novel genes thus far identified. This Omics2TreatIOD team, with Dr. van Karnebeek seving as PI, was recently awarded Genome BC and CIHR funding to expand their work with affected families around the globe, and generate knowledge on underlying disease mechanisms and targets for treatments. More can be read about the projects in the cover story of the Summer 2013 Edition of the BC Children’s Hospital Foundation’s Speaking of Children.

Dr. van Karnebeek is the recipient of Laura McRae Award for Excellence in Pediatrics from the University of BC/BC College of Physicians and Surgeons, Pediatrics, the 2012 Digital Health Innovation Summit award for her work on www.Treatable-ID.org WebApp, and Most Outstanding Autism Research Distinction from the Dutch Scientific Journal for Autism. She was recently selected as a finalist for the 2013 CIHR’s IG Maud Menten New Principal Investigator Prize, Clinical Theme. Dr. van Karnebeek is actively involved in philanthropic activities as a founder, researcher, and supporter of several nonprofit organizations including Tour de TIDE and Foundation Tweega Medica in East Africa.

UBC Library Resources

van Karnebeek, C. D., Houben, R. F., Lafek, M., Giannasi, W., & Stockler, S. (2012). The treatable intellectual disability APP w ww. treatable-id. org: A digital tool to enhance diagnosis & care for rare diseases. [Link]

Van Karnebeek, C. D., Jansweijer, M. C., Leenders, A. G., Offringa, M., & Hennekam, R. C. (2005). Diagnostic investigations in individuals with mental retardation: a systematic literature review of their usefulness. European journal of human genetics13(1), 6-25. [Link]

Merks, J. H., van Karnebeek, C. D., Caron, H. N., & Hennekam, R. (2003). Phenotypic abnormalities: terminology and classification. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A123(3), 211-230. [Link]


Bob Prittie Metrotown, Burnaby Public Library (6100 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby BC V5H 4N5 )  




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Dr. Linda Siegel of the UBC Faculty of Education

“Understanding Dyslexia and Other Learning Disabilities”

February 20, 2014 – 4.00PM to 5.30PM at the Brighouse Branch of the Richmond Public Library (RPL)

understanding-dyslexia-square Dr. Linda Siegel’s latest research in Understanding Dyslexia and Other Learning Disabilities addresses how our educational system has failed to identify many children with learning disabilities and calls for the adoption of straightforward diagnostic techniques so that treatment options can be implemented at a young age. Many children who struggle with learning become discouraged in the classroom and isolated from their peers. Many adults whose learning disabilities were not recognized in school suffer from deep feelings of inadequacy that often prevent them from developing close relationships, finding rewarding employment, or living happily.

In this talk, Linda Siegel challenges the use of complex and time-consuming testing that is currently used to diagnose learning disabilities. In their place, she outlines simple and pragmatic techniques for testing for disabilities in reading, mathematics, spelling, and writing. Linda_headshot Dr. Siegel gives first-hand accounts of people living with learning disabilities, case studies from literature, and profiles of highly accomplished individuals who have achieved success despite their learning disabilities. Their stories encourage people with learning challenges and those who support them to recognize and nurture each person’s special talents. Understanding Dyslexia and Other Learning Disabilities implores families, teachers, and other educational professionals to provide resources and services for all those struggling with learning so that no more lives are compromised.

 

Speaker Bio: Linda Siegel is the Dorothy Lam Chair in Special Education at the University of British Columbia.   Linda Siegel is an eminent psychologist and educator and is an internationally respected authority on reading and learning disabilities.


Richmond Public Library (Brighouse Branch), 7700 Minoru Gate #100 Richmond, BC V6Y 1R8


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RPL 1

Margery Hawkins photo Sept 2013Geertje_Boschma

Dr. Geertje Boschma and Dr. Margery Hawkins of the UBC’s School of Nursing  

“History, geography and ethics of health worker migration in Canada”

October 9, 2013 – 1.00PM to 2.00PM at the Tommy Douglas Library at the Burnaby Public Library (BPL)

Presented by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and Woodward Library, the Health Information Series is an ongoing public lecture series that take place in the Lower Mainland community.  Hosted by the Burnaby Public Library’s Tommy Douglas Branch Library and in collaboration with the Multicultural Helping House, Dr. Geertje Boschma and Margery Hawkins will be giving an important presentation that explores issues of health worker migration through examining the history, geography, and ethics of international recruitment and migration of health workers to Canada, and focusing on the experiences of registered nurses from the Philippines who have migrated to Canada. During the past few decades the migration of Filipino nurses to Canada has considerably expanded, with nurses from the Philippines making up the largest group of all immigrant nurses in the Canadian workforce.  What are the implications of these trends for the healthcare community?  Come join us as Dr. Boschma informs us in her latest research findings.

Speakers

Geertje Boschma leads a research program on the history of nursing and health care, with special emphasis on mental health and mental health nursing. Her current studies include historical analyses of the development of mental health services and the transition to community mental health in BC. She explores the ways nurses, other health professionals, clients, and families have experienced this change and have contributed to the development of community services. Furthermore, she conducts a study on the history of general hospital psychiatry and is a co-investigator on a pan-Canadian comparative study of deinstitutionalization and community mental health. Master’s and Doctoral students are involved in her program. Her research aims to add to the understanding of change in health care and nursing’s professional identity.

Dr. Margery Hawkins, PhD (Nursing), completed her dissertation on the experiences of nurses from the Philippines seeking RN licensing and employment in Canada. This talk is in partnership with the Multicultural Helping House Society.

Please register online at: https://boschma.eventbrite.ca to ensure a seat.


Tommy Douglas Library (7311 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC V5E 1G8)  


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JYKwonCome join us as JY Kwon discusses his latest book, A Lonely Bee in the Land of Flowers, a true story about the experiences of an Asian male student in nursing school. After spending most of his life in a world dominated by men in the all boys’ residence and the Korean army, Kwon finds himself suddenly transported to a female-dominated world of nursing. As he tries to survive in the “Land of Flowers,” he finds that nursing is not just a career but a humbling profession that reaches people at their most vulnerable time, regardless of gender, culture or ethnicity.

“Less than 10% of nurses in North America are male and I think the recruitment in nursing schools should reflect the diverse community that it serves,“ Kwon says. “But that’s not happening right now. There are enormous biases and stereotypes and I hope that this book will promote openness about the nursing profession to the students, instructors and the public.”

The book is already receiving critical acclaim. One Booming Ground author writes, “The anecdotes and stories [he] share as a student nurse offer a fascinating look at another world that is both different from what many experience, but relatable at the same time. We have all been in hospitals as patients or as visitors but have not often had a glimpse behind the curtain of health professionalism. We see nurses and doctors as confident and all-knowing and sometimes as cold or kind. [He’s] captured all of this!”  

For more information, please send an email to president(at)jykngroup(dot)com and for website it is http://www.jykngroup.com

To reserve a seat for this event, please register here.


May 17, 2013, 2013, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Chilcotin Room (Room 256), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall, UBC





A collaboration between Woodward Library, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, and Fraser Valley Regional Library, the Health Information Series presents Anthony Kupferschmidt. Hosted by the Fraser Valley Regional Library’s Ladner Pioneer Library, Anthony Kupferschmidt will be giving an important presentation on alzheimer and some of the work done by Alzheimer Society of BC. Healthy aging is important for everyone, and it is essential not to forget the health of your brain as well! This workshop encourages participants to actively engage in protecting and maintaining their brain. Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, as well as strategies for improving the health of your mind, body and spirit.

Biography of Speaker

As the Support and Education Coordinator at Alzheimer’s Society of B.C, Anthony Kupferschmidt leads educational sessions for persons with dementia, their family members and friends, and the general public. He also leads support groups for caregivers and persons with dementia, and offers one-on-one support for those in his community touched by dementia. Formally educated and deeply experienced with the functions of the aging brain, Anthony uses that education in his support for those living with dementia as well as their caretakers and on their journey. Anthony received his Masters degree in Gerontology at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and was Neuropsychometrist in the Clinic for Alzheimer Disease and Related Disorders at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Hospital.

UBC Library Resources

O’Rourke, N., Kupferschmidt, A. L., Claxton, A., Smith, J. Z., Chappell, N., & Beattie, B. L. (2010). Psychological resilience predicts depressive symptoms among spouses of persons with Alzheimer disease over time. Aging and Mental Health14(8), 984-993. [Link]

O’Rourke, N., Naslund, J., Kupferschmidt, A., & Beattie, B. L. (2009). Idealization of marriage as a distress buffer among spouses of Alzheimer patients. Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association,5(4), P231-P231. [Link]

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