Photo: Susan Parker Don Liebig / UCLA Photography

 

In the News: UBC and Abroad

 

UBC appoints new University Librarian – Susan E. Parker

“Being named University Librarian at UBC is an honour, and the highlight of my career,” says Susan Parker. “I look forward to partnering with UBC’s excellent library staff, students, and faculty as we continue to develop and deliver outstanding services, scholarly resource collections, and welcoming library facilities for the UBC community.”

Read the full announcement here

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Compute Canada & CARL-Portage – Beta Testing of FRDR

Check out the new research management tool by The Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR). ‘A joint initiative led by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and Compute Canada provid[ing] Canadian researchers a place to deposit large data sets and to improve the discovery of Canadian research data’.

Visit the FRDR beta testing site

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OA journals & Canadian universities

Canadian Universities Support Publication in and the Launching of Open Access Journals

“As Open Access journals gain in recognition across scholarly communities, Canadian universities voice increasingly vocal support for Open Access journals…”

Continue reading here

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New Research Data Centre opens at UNBC

Why are the graduate students and approved researchers smiling? It definitely has something to do with the new University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) Research Data Centre.

Learn more about UNBC’s Research Data Centre

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Increase the Impact

Beyond the Beyond: Can we Increase the Impact and Reach of Scholarly Research?

From stakeholders to voters, many folks are in need of greater access and transparency when it comes to research and research outcomes.  As noted by Vicky Williams, “with increasing funder mandates for research to demonstrate broader impact – on society, policy, the economy, or the environment – research has to reach a broader audience.”

Continue reading here

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OA in the Humanities

Why Is Open Access Moving So Slowly In The Humanities? By Peter Suber

While OA has made strides over the years via open access repositories (in physics) and open access journals (in biomedicine), Peter Suber provides some insight on the “nine differences between the humanities and the sciences”.

Read the first and second of his blog posts from the new series on Open Access in the Humanities” by Blog of the APA (The American Philosophical Association)

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Upcoming OA/OE Conferences

 

 

OpenCon 2017 in Berlin, Germany

OpenCon affords a unique opportunity for “students and early career academic professionals from across the world” to learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data” as well as to “develop critical skills, and catalyze action toward a more open system for sharing the world’s information—from scholarly and scientific research, to educational materials, to digital research data”.

 

OE Global 2018 in Delft, the Netherlands

The Open Education (OE) Global Conference is an “internationally diverse [one] devoted exclusively to open education, attracting researchers, practitioners, policy makers, educators and students from more than 35 countries to discuss and explore how Open Education advances educational practices around the world”.

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New BCcampus Annual Review

BCcampus 2016/17 Annual Review

Highlights of faculty and instructor partnerships and projects on the future of post-secondary learning and teaching in British Columbia

Read the review here

 

 

 

 

This year, two acclaimed UBC researchers are among a select few distinguished recipients who are being honoured for their lifetime achievements. Congratulations to both of them!

 

“[My] research focusses on pictorial representation and perception;

the aesthetic and epistemic value of pictures, including scientific images;

theories of art and its value; the ontology of art; computer art and new art forms;

and aesthetic value, wherever it may be found.”

– Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, Humanities, University of British Columbia

 

One of the six Killam Research Fellow recipients is Dr. Dominic McIver Lopes, a UBC scholar and professor, who is “one of the foremost contemporary philosophers of art” whose “work focuses on the nature and significance of art and the aesthetic”.  While he previously was a Guggenheim Fellow, a fellow of the National Humanities Center as well as a Leverhulme Visiting Research Professor at the University of Warwick, he also held other visiting positions in Florida, Japan, Italy, and France. He has also won two other teaching awards, the Philosophical Quarterly Essay Prize and the American Society for Aesthetics Outstanding Monograph Prize.

Learn more about Dr. Lopes here

 

 

“If anything helped me to move forward in my career,

it was the curiosity to look behind every open door.”

– Dr. Julio Montaner, Health Sciences, University of British Columbia

 

Among the five scholars receiving the Killam Prize this year is Dr. Julio Montaner, a UBC physician, scientist, and advocate, who provides leadership in the international HIV/AIDS research community. He was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada-The Academies of Arts, Humanities and Sciences (RSC) and the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame in 2015 and has received many awards and recognition during his lifelong career including these notable ones: the Canadian Institutes of Health’s Knowledge Translation Award, Prix Galien Award, Albert Einstein World of Science Award, and The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for contributions to the field of HIV/AIDS, to name just a few.

Find research by Dr. Montaner here

 

 

About The Killam Program:

  • Generously funded by Mrs. Dorothy J. Killam in memory of her husband, Izaak Walton Killam, the Killam awards make up part of the Killam Trusts
  • Established in 1967, the Killam Research Fellowships were created and, in 1981, the Killam Prizes were inaugurated
  • The Killam trusts “fund scholarship and research at four Canadian universities, a neurological research and clinical institute and the Canada Council”
  • Approximate value of the Killam Trusts is $425 million with a Canada Council portion of $55 million

 

About the Killam Prizes:

  • Recognizing outstanding Canadian scholars and scientists in industry, government agencies or universities for their pioneer work in the advancement of research
  • Five annual prizes of $100,000 are awarded (1 prize each in the fields of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences, and engineering)

 

Learn about UBC Killam Awards and Fellowships here

 

 

Explore more UBC research awards here

 

 

Above image is courtesy of Killam Trusts

 

olh-logoblue-large-1024x271

 

“The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is a charitable organisation dedicated to publishing open access scholarship with no author-facing article processing charges (APCs). We are funded by an international consortium of libraries who have joined us in our mission to make scholarly publishing fairer, more accessible, and rigorously preserved for the digital future.” (Open Library of Humanities)

 

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We are extremely pleased to announce that the University of British Columbia Library has joined the Open Library of Humanities’ Library Partnership Subsidy system. UBC consistently ranks as one of the world’s top research universities. Globally connected, UBC attracts the highest calibre of research faculty and students and more than $500 million in research funding each year.

 

The Open Library of Humanities is an academic-led, gold open-access publisher with no author-facing charges. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the platform covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than any kind of author fee.

 

Professor Martin Paul Eve, a founder and academic project director of the OLH, welcomed the University of British Columbia Library: “It is really fantastic to have UBC as a supporter of the OLH model for open access in the humanities. It is clear that OA has benefits for all disciplines. The challenge has been in finding a model that can support OA outside of the natural sciences. With the help of institutions such as the University of British Columbia, we will continue to expand the OLH’s efforts.”

 

Full OLH news release here

 

Above image and text excerpt are courtesy of OLH

 



Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS).  Once undertaken primarily by museum professionals, the activity of  curatorship has  been  popularized via the Web. Social media tools, such as YouTube playlists and Pinterest Web bulletin boards, enable users to curate a diverse range of materials for personal use and for broader publication.  But what makes one set of “curated” items more interesting than another? In this paper, we show how findings from an initial humanistic  inquiry led to a lab-based user  experiment, and how combined insights from these studies have illuminated new research streams in both humanistic and design research modes.

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