The Institute for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISoTL) is excited to host Professor Dragan Gasevic, Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics from University of Edinburgh, to talk about State and Directions of Learning Analytics Adoption.  The analysis of data collected from user interactions with educational and information technology has attracted much attention as a promising approach for advancing our understanding of the learning process.  This promise motivated the emergence of the new field of learning analytics and mobilized the education sector to embrace the use of data for decision-making. This talk will first introduce the field of learning analytics and touch on lessons learned from well-known case studies. The talk will then identify critical challenges that require immediate attention in order for learning analytics to make a sustainable impact on learning, teaching, and decision making. The talk will conclude by discussing a set of milestones selected as critical for the maturation of the field of learning analytics.

The most important take away from the talk will be that:

  • systemic approaches to the development and adoption of learning analytics are critical,
  • multidisciplinary teams are necessary to unlock a full potential of learning analytics, and
  • capacity development at institutional levels through the inclusion of diverse stakeholders is essential for full learning analytics adoption.

 


Event Details

Date: March 21, 2017

Time: 3:00 pm-4:00 pm

Where: Irving K Barber Learning Centre, Seminar (Room 2.22 A/B)

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


Speaker Biography

Dragan Gasevic is a Professor and the Chair in Learning Analytics and Informatics in the Moray House School of Education and the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh. As the President (2015-2017) and a co-founder of the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR), he has had the pleasure to serve as a founding program co-chair of the International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge (LAK) in 2011 and 2012, general chair of LAK in 16, founding program co-chair of the Learning Analytics Summer Institute (LASI) in 2013 and 2014, and a founding editor of the Journal of Learning Analytics. Computer scientist by formal education, Dragan considers himself a learning analyst whose research centers on learning analytics, self-regulated and social learning, higher education policy, and data mining. The award-winning work of his team on the LOCO-Analytics software is considered one of the pioneering contributions in the growing area of learning analytics. Recently, he has founded ProSolo Technologies Inc. that developed a software solution for tracking, evaluating, and recognizing competencies gained through self-directed learning and social interactions. He is a frequent keynote speaker and a (co-)author of numerous research papers and books.

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).

Research Day showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies.

Questions about social media as sources of information about individuals (of different ages, genders, backgrounds) and communities, their uses in our personal and professional lives, and impact on our practices and overall well-being are central to the work of students and scholars across all our iSchool programs. Recognizing this common ground, this year’s Research Day will focus on the broad topic of “information, social media, and well-being,” considering the many connections social media now have with the way we do information, library, and archival studies.

This event happened on March 10, 2017.


Speaker:

Lyle Ungar, Professor of Computer And Information Science, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 200 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on eleven patents. His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including spectral methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

“Social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect portal onto people’s lives.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.”


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Smith, R. J., Crutchley, P., Schwartz, H. A., Ungar, L., Shofer, F., Padrez, K. A., & Merchant, R. M. (2017). Variations in Facebook Posting Patterns Across Validated Patient Health Conditions: A Prospective Cohort Study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(1), e7. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Kern, M. L., Park, G., Eichstaedt, J. C., Schwartz, H. A., Sap, M., Smith, L. K., & Ungar, L. H. (2016). Gaining insights from social media language: Methodologies and challenges. [Link]

Sinnenberg, L., DiSilvestro, C. L., Mancheno, C., Dailey, K., Tufts, C., Buttenheim, A. M., … & Asch, D. A. (2016). Twitter as a Potential Data Source for Cardiovascular Disease Research. Jama cardiology, 1(9), 1032-1036. [Link]

Carpenter, J., Preotiuc-Pietro, D., Flekova, L., Giorgi, S., Hagan, C., Kern, M. L., … & Seligman, M. E. (2016). Real Men Don’t Say “Cute” Using Automatic Language Analysis to Isolate Inaccurate Aspects of Stereotypes. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1948550616671998. [Link]

Brooks, S. (05/01/2015). Computers in human behavior: Does personal social media usage affect efficiency and well-being? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2014.12.053 [Link]

Gerson, J., Plagnol, A. C., & Corr, P. J. (10/01/2016). Computers in human behavior: Subjective well-being and social media use: Do personality traits moderate the impact of social comparison on facebook? Elsevier. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.023 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Computer Science

Information Visualization

 

This session aims to identify ways to support and promote accurate information about Aboriginal people, identify how current library structures may be barriers to full inclusion for Aboriginal students and how to address them, and identify power issues at play in our own instructional practice and how to make positive changes. Panelists are asked to consider the following questions:

How do you help your community find themselves in your collection or in your course?
How do you Indigenize your instruction?


Panelists

Deborah Lee is a Cree, Mohawk and Métis librarian. She worked as a Reference Librarian at the National Library of Canada / Library and Archives Canada for seven years. In 2007, Deborah became the Indigenous Studies Portal Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UofS since 2011. Deborah has presented widely at local, national and international conferences, including ACRL in 2015.

Patricia Geddes is the Student Engagement and Community Outreach Librarian at Vancouver Island University. She is a Liaison Librarian for Aboriginal Education Services, First Nations Studies, and the Faculty of Academic and Career Preparation.

Jenna Walsh was born in Vancouver on unceded Coast Salish territory and grew up in an inner city neighbourhood with a diverse Aboriginal population. At the University of British Columbia, her Interdisciplinary BA focused on global Indigeneity, and she did the First Nations Curriculum Concentration program for her MLIS.

Kim Lawson is Heiltsuk with English/ Danish ancestry. She is one of the authors of the “Protocols for Native American Archival Materials,” was the Archivist/ Librarian at The Union of BC Indian Chiefs Resource Centre, has an MLIS from UBC and is learning to speak Heiltsuk.

Camille Callison is a member of the Tahltan First Nation and the Indigenous Services Librarian & Liaison Librarian for Anthropology, Native Studies and Social Work at the University of Manitoba, Member of the UM Indigenous Advisory Circle (IAC) and has presented extensively on Indigenous Library & Archives issues.

Moderator

Sarah Dupont’s ancestry is Metis, French, and British. She is from Prince George, BC and is the Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at UBC Library, where she works in the Xwi7xwa Library and Irving K Barber Learning Centre. Her liaison areas include Indigenous Education and Indigenous Social Work. Sarah is the project manager for Indigitization, a UBC program to support First Nations digitization and preservation of their community resources.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Doerksen, K., Karen Doerksen, & Carla Martin. (03/01/2016). Partnership: A loose coupling: Aboriginal participation in library education – A selective literature review The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. doi:10.21083/partnership.v10i2.3337 [Link]

Face, M., & Hollens, D. (2004). A Digital Library to Serve a Region: The Bioregion and First Nations Collections of the Southern Oregon Digital Archives. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 44(2), 116-121. [Link]

Kelly, B., & Barbara Kelly. (01/01/2011). Partnership: Reflecting the lives of aboriginal women in canadian public library collection development The Partnership, provincial and territorial library association of Canada c/o Ontario Library Associ. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Publishers, Distributors & News Media

First Nations & Indigenous Studies

Indigenous Librarianship

 

 

 

Acknowledgement: The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to contribute to the promotion of this unique opportunity.  We acknowledge the Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society’s website as the source for most of this content.

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society is an enterprising non-profit organization that develops and delivers transformative education inspired by Haida Gwaii. In partnership with leading universities, we offer students immersive, experiential learning opportunities in rural, resource-dependent communities in transition. Here the Haida Nation, island communities, and provincial and federal governments are working through complex joint management models towards reconciliation and sustainability.

Drawing on Haida Gwaii’s legacy of innovation and leadership, HGHES offers a range of programming including undergraduate semesters, executive education and professional development courses, research opportunities, public lectures and workshops, and more.

The Haida Gwaii Semesters include the following areas of focus:

  1. Natural Resource Science
  2. Natural Resource Studies
  3. Reconciliation Studies
  4. Marine Planning

Please visit http://hghes.ca/haida-gwaii-semesters/ for more information, including the application process, tuition, fees and FAQs

The Haida Gwaii Higher Education Society embraces a place-based approach; we see the social and ecological systems of Haida Gwaii as vibrant natural classrooms for our students to engage with, grounding course content in living, local case studies. We believe in working together and facilitating a rich collaboration between academics and local knowledge holders, supporting a meaningful learning exchange and the development of a broad perspective.

  • As issues around the globe become increasingly complex, If students are from UBC, there is an agreement in place to facilitate registration.
  • For non-UBC students there is an opportunity to earn UBC credits and transfer them back to the student’s home institution.

 

Every Spring since 1981, Vancouver’s Alcuin Society holds a national competition to select the country’s most beautiful books of the previous year. The winning books tour every province in Canada, and are also exhibited at the two major book fairs in Germany, in Frankfurt and Leipzig. As well, copies are donated to the Canadian Embassy Library in Tokyo, where they are exhibited during the Tokyo International Book Fair.

 

The purpose of the competition is to motivate publishers to pay attention to the look of books, as well as to their content. In addition, the Society hopes to encourage book designers by national and international recognition of their work.

 

The books are judged by three different jurors each year – experts in their fields from all over the country, and, occasionally, from abroad. The entire book is taken into account: the cover, the choice of type, layout, white space; paper used, readibility, creativity in design; and most of all, the appropriateness of the design to the content.

 

This March, IKBLC is exhibiting the winners from last year’s competition. There are eight categories of books: from children’s books to pictorial, from poetry to reference. Some of the judges’ comments on what they liked about the books are available, and displayed near the books.

 

PDFs of the full-colour awards catalogues are available online for some of the past competition winners. In mid-March 2017, the Society’s 35th competition will take place in Vancouver, for Canada’s 2016 publications, and when it’s published, this year’s catalogue will be available online as well.

 

This exhibit takes place March 1 to 31, at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (2nd level).

Take a rare glimpse into Japan in the 1890s-1920s through the photographs taken by a Canadian missionary, John Cooper Robinson. We can only begin to understand Cooper Robinson’s photographs by overlaying both Canadian and Japanese historical contexts and perspectives. Join our symposium led by art historians and historians who specialize in Japan and Canada, to explore ways in which the Cooper Robinson photographs can be used and made relevant for future research and teaching. Symposium attendees will have the opportunity to visit the ongoing curated exhibit at Rare Books and Special Collections (RBSC). Register here for this event!


Event Details

When: Friday, March 24 2017  12:00 PM-4:00 PM

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room

Symposium

12:00-1:00
Registration | Reception (light refreshments will be provided)
1:00-1:15 pm
Opening Remarks | Introduction (donor, Jill Robinson)
1:15-2:00 pm
Allen Hockley (respondent, Ignacio Adriasola)
2:00-3:00 pm
RBSC exhibit visit | coffee break
3:00-3:15 pm
Hamish Ion
3:15-4:00 pm
Round table discussion (facilitator, Tristan Grunow) | Concluding Remarks


Speakers and Participants

Allen Hockley is Associate Professor of Art History at Dartmouth College. He specializes in early Japanese photography and woodblock prints and illustrated books from the Tokugawa through early Showa periods.

A. Hamish Ion is a professor emeritus in the History Department, Royal Military College of Canada. He is a specialist in modern Japanese history.

Ignacio Adriasola is assistant professor in the Department of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory at the University of British Columbia.

Tristan Grunow is assistant professor without review in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia.

The Asian Library and Rare Books and Special Collections and are delighted to host a symposium to launch our current exhibit Double Exposure | Japan-Canada: Missionary Photographs of Meiji-Taisho Japan.

This event is made possible through generous support from the Center for Japanese Research, the UBC History Department, the UBC Library, and nominal support from the Consulate General of Japan.

For more information, please contact Japanese Language Librarian Naoko Kato at naoko.kato@ubc.ca.

In collaboration with the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre Community Engagement & Programs division, the Faculty Association Contract Faculty Committee presents the Third Annual Contract Faculty Colloquium, which provides contract faculty an opportunity to share with and learn from their contract faculty colleagues across campus in a genial, relaxed atmosphere. Short papers will be presented by contract faculty from a diverse range of departments, including Engineering, Political Science, English, Sociology, Asian Studies, Gender, Race and Social Justice and Arts Studies in Reading and Writing. Please join us for a stimulating afternoon!

We are grateful for the support from the UBC Faculty Association for the support of this event.


Event Details

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Time: 11:30-4:30pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room (Rm 301)

 

In collaboration with the Public Scholars Initiative (PSI), the IKBLC Community Engagement & Programs division presents the “PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series,” which showcases doctoral students telling their community-engaged research stories in just under seven minutes.

In “Human(e) Interactions with the Environment,” nine PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative engage the public by using the Pecha Kucha format to present on how their research is contributing to the public good, and making a change in the world.  This year’s PSI themes include education, environment, culture, social justice, and health. Can’t make this event? It will be made online for viewing from the IKBLC webcast portal.

Date: Wednesday, 15 March 2017, 6:30-8:30pm at UBC Robson Square, Room C100

Speakers

Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry), Evan Bowness (IRES), Mollie Chapman (IRES), Tugce Conger (IRES), Jamie Fenneman (Botany), Graham McDowell (IRES), Emily Rugel (Population and Public Health), Steve Williams (IRES), Stefan Pauer (Law).

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