indigitization-grant-2017-feature5-copy

The Indigitization project brought past program participants together in June 2016 to discuss digitization practices and Indigenous knowledge in communities. The article appears in Issue 4 of BCLA Perspectives.

Indigitization

The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre is pleased to award funding to nine new projects as part of the Indigitization: Aboriginal Audio Digitization & Preservation Program (AADP) this summer.

Since 2013, the Indigitization: Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program (AADP) has provided grants to B.C. Aboriginal organizations in supporting the conservation, preservation, and access of Indigenous community information resources. The six month program provides equipment, training and funding support to convert audio cassette tapes to digital formats. 

This multi-faceted program provides resources for the digital conversion of at risk audio cassette materials, to support cultural preservation and revitalization efforts. Over the next six months, the following communities will be undertaking their respective projects under the guidance of program staff:

Participant Project Title
Tsilhqot’in National Government Preservation of Tsilhqot’in Intangible Heritage: Digitizing and Enhancing Taped Audio Interviews and Gatherings from the 1960s to 2002
Musqueam Indian Band Musqueam Governance Digitization Project
Haida Gwaii Museum Haida Gwaii Museum – Digitization of Audio Tapes
Xaad Kihlgaa Hl Suu.u Society (XKHS) / Haida Language Society Xaad Kil Digitization Project
Treaty 8 Tribal Association Understanding Traditional Land Use of the Peace Region through Elders Oral History Stories
Heiltsuk Cultural Education Centre Indigitization Phase II – Towards a Digital Infrastructure
Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation Digitization – Tape Preservation Project
Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group (HTG) Audio Digitization & Preservation Project 2015
Wuikinuxv Nation Wuikinuxv Tape Digitization Project

The AADP looks forward to welcoming representatives from each of these communities to UBC for an intensive, week-long training program later this month. Congratulations to all the recipients!

For more information on the Indigitization program, please visit the website or contact Sarah Dupont, Aboriginal Engagement Librarian.

 

About Indigitization

Indigitization is a collaborative project between the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC), the First Nations Technology Council (FNTC), and three First Nations communities: Heiltsuk, Ktunaxa, and ‘Namgis. Other contributors include UBC’s Museum of Anthropology (MOA), School for Library, Archival, and Information Studies (SLAIS), and the First Nations House of Learning (FNHL).

The Indigitization program focuses on the conservation and preservation of Indigenous community information resources. The deadline for applications has been extended to 5 pm on April 8th, 2015.

Three B.C. First Nations have received funding from UBC’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and the Museum of Anthropology to preserve their oral histories, traditions and culture. The latest recipients of the Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program (AADPP) include the Tsilhqot’in National Government (Williams Lake), the Hupacasath First Nation (Port Alberni) and the Yuuł ʔtłʔath First Nation (Ucluelet). The AADPP – now in its second year – provides matching funds for B.C. Aboriginal organizations to convert audio cassette tapes to digital formats for preservation and access. Each recipient is awarded up to $10,000 and the project seeks proposals bi-annually from within the province. Project partners also include UBC’s Museum of Anthropology and the First Nations Technology Council.

For the Hupacasath First Nation, the funds will result in connecting their own resources with those held by the American Philosophical Society’s Centre for Native American and Indigenous Research. This Philadelphia institution is digitizing its holdings of Hupacasath materials and has reached out to the community to co-curate this digital collection. These materials, recorded by ethnographers and linguists who visited the Alberni Valley, are from as early as the late 1880’s.

The Tsilhqot’in National Government hopes to preserve their traditional knowledge gained from their elders – a critically important task, especially as most of these teachings are passed orally from generation to generation. Their digitization work consists of approximately 400 cassettes. The AADPP funding will enable the Tsilquot’in language committee to continue its work on language projects.

The Yuuł ʔtłʔath First Nation’s digitization project also focuses on digitizing language materials. They plan to use AADPP funding to purchase a new computer that will enable them to not only to digitize, describe and preserved their audio materials, but to produce new language learning materials using the appropriate orthography.

staff member with equipment

Gerry Lawson (MOA) works with a community member at UBC’s Museum of Anthropology.

The AADPP will welcome representatives from each community to the University of British Columbia for an intensive, week long audio digitization training program this coming October. The training, held at UBC’s Museum of Anthropology, provides opportunities for recipients to get hands-on-training and advice for implementing in-house digitization programs.

For more information about the AADPP and previous recipients, please visit the Indigitization website.

 

Program Contact:
Sarah Dupont
Aboriginal Engagement Librarian
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
sarah.dupont@ubc.ca | 604.827.0342

Gordon Yusko
Assistant Director
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
gordon.yusko@ubc.ca | 604.822.2298 

Third funding cycle opens for Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program. The deadline for applications is August 1, 2014.

Congratulations to the latest successful applicants of the Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program (AADPP) – a pilot initiative led by UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre in partnership with the Museum of Anthropology.

Five projects have been awarded funding under the program, which provides matching funds for B.C. Aboriginal organizations to digitize audio cassette tapes for preservation and access.

The projects are:

The first two successful AADPP projects, from the Tsawwassen First Nation and the Upper St’át’imc Language, Culture, and Education Society, were announced by the Learning Centre in 2013.

For more information, visit the Indigitization website or contact:

  • Sarah Dupont, Program Coordinator and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, 604.822.0480
  • Gordon Yusko, Assistant Director, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 604.822.2298

 

indigitization

Valuable oral histories, traditions and culture from two B.C. Aboriginal communities will be preserved, thanks to the Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program (AADPP).

This pilot initiative - led by UBC Library’s Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, in partnership with the Museum of Anthropology and the First Nations Technology Council - provides matching funds for B.C. Aboriginal organizations to convert audio cassette tapes to digital formats for preservation and access. Current plans are to offer equipment, training and funding support for four to six projects per year, with applications accepted twice a year.

Congratulations to the inaugural AADPP recipients –Tsawwassen First Nation and the Upper St’át’imc Language, Culture, and Education Society!

Tsawwassen First Nation, located in the Lower Mainland, plans to digitize 165 analogue cassettes that contain interviews with many of the community’s Elders. This will enable the community to access Elder teachings in a more accessible medium, and build skills among administrative staff and within the community.

The Upper St’át’imc Language, Culture, and Education Society, based in Lillooet, aims to digitize 133 audio interviews undertaken since 1991 with speakers, storytellers and those willing to share their cultural knowledge. The aim is to ensure the long-term preservation and accessibility of these culturally significant materials.

Both projects are planned for completion in 2014.

Meanwhile, the Learning Centre is pleased to announce the second call for applications to the AADPP, which has been revised with a new application form and some changes to the funding model. Previous and new applicants are encouraged to submit proposals.

Applications must be submitted by Friday, February 28, 2014. Please visit the Indigitization site for details about eligibility, access, guidelines, criteria and more.

For more information, please contact:

Sarah Dupont, Program Coordinator and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian

sarah.dupont@ubc.ca

604.822.0480

 

Gordon Yusko, Assistant Director, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

gordon.yusko@ubc.ca

604.822.2298

 

Ingrid ParentIt has been an exciting year at UBC Library, and I am pleased to share a few highlights with you. Much of our work provides us with an opportunity to connect, learn and grow with our users and community partners. Thank you for your ongoing support and commitment.

The Library continues to advance in the digital world, thanks to the digitization of several important collections. In the spring, the Irving K. Barber learning Centre announced a grant for the B.C. Aboriginal Audio Digitization and Preservation Program, an important initiative that assists B.C. Indigenous organizations in converting audio cassette tapes for preservation and access. On the opposite end of the spectrum is one of the oldest items in our collection, a medieval manuscript book recently acquired by the Library that provides research and learning opportunities for students and scholars.

Changing campus needs regarding teaching and learning guide the direction of UBC Library, and it was with great excitement that we partnered with the Faculty of Education to launch UBC’s first LOOC. Other changing user needs informed decisions to consolidate services into one-stop service points, as well as renovate key spaces in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. 

Recognizing the achievements of researchers, scholars and community members brings us great satisfaction, and so I was pleased this year to present the inaugural winner of the Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Book on B.C. The Library also awarded the fourth annual UBC Library Innovative Dissemination of Research Award, and four students received GSS cIRcle Open Scholar Awards.  

It was a busy year for the Library’s community involvement, both at the local and international level. I was honoured to have served as the first Canadian president of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA). My presidency, which concluded this year, provided me with an opportunity to showcase UBC and Canadian accomplishments to the world, and to bring international learnings back to the campus. We were happy to host the 2013 Pacific Rim Digital Library Alliance Annual Meeting at UBC Library, and welcome several international visitors throughout the year, including City University (London), Copenhagen Business School and Shanghai Municipal Archives. 

I was appreciative of the opportunity to host a book and film launch in celebration of the Wallace B. Chung and Madeline H. Chung Collection, and to recognize one of our most generous supporters. This exceptional collection is one example of the extraordinary resources available to Library users and community partners.

Finally, UBC Library once again partnered with the UBC Alma Mater Society to deliver the 11th annual Food For Fines Campaign. The program raises funds for the Greater Vancouver Food Bank and UBC’s AMS Food Bank to support disadvantaged members of the community. I am grateful for the continued generosity of Library users in supporting this important program. 

Best wishes to you throughout the holiday season, and a very Happy New Year.

Sincerely,

Ingrid Parent

University Librarian

University of British Columbia

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375

Renewals: 

604.822.3115
604.822.2883
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC | © Copyright The University of British Columbia

Spam prevention powered by Akismet