Celebrate the 25th Annual Science and Physics Day at Playland!  With help from a group of educators from the UBC Department of Physics and Astronomy, teachers can bring their classes to Playland to have fun and study physics in action. The British Columbia Brightest Minds Competition is part of the Science and Physics Day two-week event, so bring your students to Playland for some educational fun!

Read more and see the video from The Vancouver Sun here.

Program guides and ride specifications:
Amusement Park Biology 12
Amusement Park Chemistry 12
Amusement Park Physics Grades 11-12
Amusement Park Science Grade 10
Amusement Park Science Grade 8
La Science du Plaisir
Science of Fun (Grades 4-7)
Ride Specs

Also, Marketing Day for Business students, and The Science of Agriculture: PNE Kidz Discovery Farm School Tours  Grades K-4

Bring your class for a wide variety of dynamic, educational and interactive mountain adventures that include science, social studies and recreational components. These programs help teachers meet curriculum objectives while providing students with hands-on, motivating and fun experiences. 

~more information from The Peak of Vancouver Grouse Mountain Website

Link also available from the UBC Education Library Website under K-12 Instructional Resources

Join the discussion and help shape a National Reading Plan that will encourage, support and promote the joy of reading across Canada.

Have a look at the National Reading Plan DRAFT here.

Click here to view a detailed programme.
 

Register now, SPACE IS LIMITED.

~text and links from the National Reading Campaign website.

The Diversity and Media Toolbox is a comprehensive suite of resources for teachers, students, law enforcement representatives and the general public, that explores issues relating to stereotyping, bias and hate in mainstream media and on the Internet. The program, which includes professional development tutorials, lesson plans, interactive student modules and background articles, is divided into two distinct but complementary topic areas: media portrayals of diversity and online hate.

Teacher’s Resource Catalogue

Trousse Éducative – Diversité et Médias here.

The Diversity and Media Toolbox was produced with the support of the Government of Canada through the Department of Justice Canada’s Justice Partnership and Innovation Program.

~text from the Media Awareness Network website

Check out The Art Zone – from the National Gallery of Art interactive educational resource website.

Make a work of art online!

Creating Caring Classrooms: How to encourage students to communicate, create, and be compassionate of others

This passionate book is about community, compassion, and creativity; it is about caring for others. It is also about helping students care about their work. Teachers will learn how to establish inclusive classrooms where kindness and concern become crucial backdrops for critical conversations. They will be introduced to simple but profound strategies that initiate and maintain respectful dialogue, promote collaboration over competition, and confront difficult issues such as bullying and exclusion.

Creating Caring Classrooms is committed to building respectful relationships among students, teachers, and the school community. Through active, engaging, relevant, open-ended activities, students will be encouraged to explore events, ideas, themes, texts, stories, and relationships from different perspectives, and then represent those new understandings in innovative and creative ways.

Authors: Kathleen Gould Lundy and Larry Swartz

Publication Date: 2011      ISBN: 9781551382708         Pages: 160

~from the Pembroke Publishers Website

UBC Library Holdings Information here.

Creating a National Reading Strategy for Canada:  About the National Reading Campaign

The National Reading Campaign is about creating a reading strategy for Canada. It is about engaging Canadians in exploring what a Canadian reading plan would look like, and what we would expect the key outcomes to be. In short, it is a campaign to incorporate and promote reading as a central feature of 21st century Canadian citizenship.

The National Reading Campaign had its beginnings in 2008, when a coalition of readers, parents, writers, editors, librarians, bookstore owners, teachers, publishers and distributors came together to assess and consider the changing reading habits of Canadians. Learn more about the Reading Coalition here.

The first forum, held in 2008, proposed that a National Reading Campaign be developed over the course of three Reading Summits. The first Summit was held in Toronto in 2009, the second was held in Montreal in 2011 and the third will take place in May 2012 in Vancouver.

Why do we need a National Reading Campaign?

Becoming a reader is at the very heart of responsible citizenship. But as we find ourselves caught in the fierce updrafts of an information hurricane, we often lose sight of what reading — as an intellectual activity — contributes to our sense of self, our cultural awareness, our capacity for self-expression and, ultimately, our notions of engaged citizenship and the collective good. Reading, after all, is about so much more than a technical act that allows us to communicate, consume media and perform the activities of daily life. To be literate is necessary, but it is not enough.

Read more about the Summit here.

~information and links from the National Reading Campaign website

While conversations are ongoing in BC and around the world focused on innovation that are linked to larger system goals including a  greater focus on personalized learning and giving kids greater ownership of their learning, these are not new objectives. Some practices worth highlighting are not only 21st century, or 20th century learning, in fact, some date back to the 19th century, and are an excellent fit for our current educational directions. At least, this is true of Montessori.

Maria Montessori, who lived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, developed teaching methods which are often described as part of the “21st century learning” phenomena.  When I spend time in our Montessori School, Eagle Harbour Montessori(currently expanding from a K-3 to a K-5 school), I am always in awe of the self-regulation and keen focus these students have.  When I walk into the room, students continue to work and there is a sense of calm and alert focus. Students are owning their learning, the conversations with primary students are very articulate; they talk about what they are doing, why they are doing it, and what they need to learn next.

What I have seen at Eagle Harbour is also supported in the recent book from Shannon Helfrich, Montessori Learning in the 21st Century:  A Guide for Parents and Teachers which links Montessori teachings with the latest neuroscientific findings.

So just what does Montessori look like in our setting:

Principles Include (from the Eagle Harbour Montessori Program 2012):

Continue reading here.

January 10, 2012 by cultureofyes

by Chris Kennedy

A new initiative by the Canadian International Learning Foundation has set out to overcome what Canadians say is the single biggest barrier to becoming a volunteer: lack of time.

“Change the world in five hours a week” is the mantra of the Educator Volunteer Network, which matches up skilled Canadians with schools in developing and at-risk regions around the world, letting them donate their time without ever leaving their desks.

Educatorvolunteer.net is the brainchild of Ryan Aldred, president of the CanILF, a registered charity devoted to improving educational opportunities for children in destitute and war-torn regions. Through the agency’s work in Afghanistan, Aldred said, he saw that online volunteers could make a massive difference to schools.

“Two things we were struck by was how interested Canadians were in getting involved and how many schools were out there looking for assistance. We kept thinking, ‘What can we do to help these schools?’

“So we came up with the notion of an online community where we could connect the two groups and help them work together. The network launched in September and the response has been amazing.”

So far more than 50 volunteers have signed up to provide one-on-one online assistance with new technologies, research requests, curriculum enhancement, development of resources, writing content for websites and putting together budgets and business plans.

To volunteer or to donate, visit educatorvolunteer.net

Read full article here.

By Gillian Burnett, Vancouver Sun December 8, 2011

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun – Education News

It was about six years ago that UBC professor Jon Beasley-Murray first noticed his students citing Wikipedia in their essays.

If they were going to use Wikipedia for his class on Latin American literature, he thought, they might as well improve some of the shoddy articles on the subject.

For the past five years, students in his class have edited or contributed articles to Wikipedia as part of a class assignment.

“It was a chance to break down some of the barriers between the university and society,” Beasley-Murray said.

Wikipedia is described as a “free, web-based, collaborative, multilingual encyclopedia project supported by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation”. It was launched in 2001 and takes the first part of its name from the Hawaiian word “wiki,” for fast, and is the name of a server program that allows anyone to edit the website’s content through their own browser.

At the moment, Beasley-Murray is one of relatively few professors using Wikipedia in class assignments, but that may change this year. The foundation behind Wikipedia is hoping to get more teachers using the website in the classroom. So far, the universities of Alberta and Toronto have agreed to take part in the project.

Read more here.

By Jordan Press, Postmedia News November 4, 2011

jpress@postmedia.com

Twitter.com/jordan_press

© Copyright (c) Postmedia News

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