Together with UBC Bookstore, Caitlin Press, and the UBC Creative Writing Alumni Association, the UBC Creative Writing Program is hosting a reading and book signing of the anthology Boobs: Women Explore What It Means to Have Breasts edited by Ruth Daniell.

“The stories represent the diverse experiences that surround breasts: the coming of age stories, the struggles with gender, the trauma, the self-love, the experience of motherhood, the early sexualisation, the struggles of not feeling like enough or feeling like too much–too much of a woman, not enough of a woman, too much cleavage, too little. […] But no matter what your personal experiences with them, Boobs will engage you and make you feel things–in the breast possible way.” –Ljudmila Petrovic, Sad Mag

At turns heartbreaking and hilarious, Boobs is a diverse collection of stories about the burdens, expectations and pleasures of having breasts. From the agony of puberty and angst of adolescence to the anxiety of aging, these stories and poems go beyond the usual images of breasts found in fashion magazines and movie posters, instead offering dynamic and honest portraits of desire, acceptance and the desire for acceptance.

Event details:

When: Wednesday, July 13th, 2pm
Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Room 182

This event is free and open to the public.

Readings by:

  • Francine Cunningham
  • Dina Del Bucchia
  • Miranda Pearson
  • Laura Ritland
  • Esther Griffin
  • Ruth Daniell
  • Sara Graefe
  • Nancy Lee

 


Change or start over? The challenge of transforming large institutions.

All broadcasters are adapting to revolutionary changes to their business; from the content they provide, to the way Canadians use their services. But how do you transform your organization when you are an iconic public institution, one as revered and sometimes maligned as Canada’s public broadcaster? Join Hubert T. Lacroix, President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada as he talks about the challenges and opportunities of change at Canada’s largest cultural institution, and what the Government’s reinvestment in public broadcasting will mean for Canadians.

Master Mind Master Class is a new alumni UBC event series, offering an unprecedented look into the minds of modern thinkers making a unique impact on the world, and the lessons they’ve learned.

This event took place May 24, 2016, in Vancouver, BC.

Moderator

Valerie Casselton, BA’77 – Managing Editor, The Vancouver Sun and The Province

Biographies

Hubert LacroixHubert T. Lacroix

Hubert T. Lacroix was appointed President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada on November 5, 2007, for a five-year term and reappointed until December 31, 2017.

As President and CEO, Mr. Lacroix is responsible for overseeing the management of CBC/Radio-Canada in order to ensure that Canada’s national public broadcaster can deliver on the various aspects of its mandate and continue to offer Canadians a broad spectrum of high quality programming that informs, enlightens and entertains, and that is created by, for and about Canadians.

Before joining CBC/Radio-Canada, Mr. Lacroix was a special counsel in the law firm Stikeman Elliott. Before that, he acted as Executive Chairman of Telemedia Corporation, and was a senior partner at McCarthy Tétrault for nearly 20 years. He also sat on the boards of directors for several major corporations and non-profit organizations.
cbc-radio-canada200px

Valerie Casselton, BA’77

Valerie CasseltonValerie Casselton is the Managing Editor of The Vancouver Sun and The Province, publishing with a combined newsroom of more than 140 journalists and staff. She is responsible for news gathering, projects and strategic initiatives that promote audience engagement over all publication platforms.

As a senior editor, she works with the management team to achieve the news gathering, readership and financial goals of the paper as it presses its competitive position as a national leader in multi-platform publication.

As two of the largest publications in Postmedia’s national network, and operating the largest newsroom in Western Canada, The Vancouver Sun and Province together reach more than 1.4 million readers every week on all platforms — mobile, tablet, desktop and in-paper.

Valerie has been a newspaper manager for 20 years and has worked at four major Canadian dailies and three television networks in both eastern and western Canada. Earlier in her career she was a reporter, editorial writer and columnist.

Valerie has served on the alumni UBC board of directors since 2013, chairs the Alumni Achievement Awards committee, serves on the TREK advisory committee and has been a UBC mentor for 15 years.

She has served as a member or chair of the boards of the Langara College Journalism School, the Centre for Investigative Journalism (now CAJ), The American Association of Sunday and Features Editors, The Pacific Paper Industry Credit Union (now VanCity), the Vancouver Biennale, and a range of community associations.

A UBC graduate with a BA(Hons) in English, Valerie also holds a degree in Journalism form Carleton University, and a CHRP designation.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Canadian Public Policy Collection, & Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage. (2008). CBC/Radio-canada: Defining distinctiveness in the changing media landscape Canada. Parliament. House of Commons.

Champagne, A., Tardif, C., Canada. Parliament.Senate.Standing Committee on Official Languages, & Canadian Government EBook Collection. (2014). CBC/Radio-canada’s language obligations: Communities want to see themselves and be heard coast to coast! : Report of the standing senate committee on official languages. Ottawa, Ontario: Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages.

Ménard, M., & desLibris – Documents. (2013). CBC/Radio-canada: Overview and key issues Parliamentary Information and Research Service. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Arts, Media & Entertainment Industries


As teaching librarians, we introduce our students to knowledge organization structures that enable inquiry and curiosity in the library, but also use language and logic that we might otherwise contest. Students researching gender and sexual identities in our library catalogs, for example, must confront a controlled vocabulary that represents bias against them more than it does the reality of their own lives. These are pivotal moments, where students intersect with structures of power. Librarians engaged in critical work against dominant knowledge formations can both help students perceive the structures of power that enable some ways of knowing and not others, and help them understand those structures as subject to change. We can begin by understanding how librarians are produced in part by intersections with structures of power.

The Workshop for Instruction in Library Use (WILU) is Canada’s only conference devoted to library instruction, information literacy, and information fluency. Sessions explore both research-based and applied subject matter, and are attended by librarians from Canada, the United States, and beyond with a variety of teaching and learning interests. It is notable that WILU is not affiliated with any association or organizing body – instead, since its inception in 1972, it has been sustained and passed on from year to year through the collaborative efforts of hosting institutions.


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Accardi, M. T., Drabinski, E., & Kumbier, A. (2010). Critical library instruction: Theories and methods. Duluth, Minn: Library Juice Press. [Available at Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – Z711.25.C65 C75 2010]

Drabinski, E. (2012). Forum:Radical teacheras an online and open access journal. The Radical Teacher, (94), 3-13. doi:10.5406/radicalteacher.94.0003 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2013). Queering the catalog: Queer theory and the politics of correction. The Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy, 83(2), 94-111. doi:10.1086/669547 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2014). Toward a kairos of library instruction. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40(5), 480-485. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2014.06.002 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2016). Valuing professionalism: Discourse as professional practice. Library Trends, 64(3), 604-614. [Link]

Langholt, J. (2012). Critical library instruction: Theories and methods. edited by maria T. accardi, emily drabinski, and alana kumbier. duluth, MN: Library juice press, 2010. pp. xvi+341. ISBN 978–1-936117-01-7. The Library Quarterly, 82(1), 93-96. doi:10.1086/662949 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Learning Technology

Library, Information, and Archival Studies

The iSchool at UBC (School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies) invites guest speakers to participate in the Colloquia Series. These events are open to the public, and are of interest to faculty, current students, alumni, and other professionals and researchers in the community.

The faculty contacts for the Colloquia Colloquia Series are Dr. Aaron Loehrlein and Dr. Heather O’Brien.

Research Day 2016: Keynote Speech

Friday, March 11, 11:00am-12:00pm

The Curator and Copyright

How does it happen that a practicing archivist, fully happy with the normal archival tasks of accessioning, describing, preserving, and making available archival collections, ends up spending most of his time thinking about copyright?  This talk will highlight three areas that seem core to the archival mission but that are also shaped by copyright.  Archivists can use new technologies to increase access to holdings, license access to content from the repository, and preserve born-digital objects.  Yet there is a copyright component to all these activities.  Understanding that component and how to minimize the risk that it poses should be part of the archivist’s toolkit. 

Speaker bio

Peter Hirtle, Affiliate Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University

Until his retirement from Cornell in 2015, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues.  Previously at Cornell, Hirtle served as Director of the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections and as the Associate Editor of D-Lib Magazine.  He is an archivist by training with an MA in History from Johns Hopkins and an MLS with a concentration in archival science from the University of Maryland.  Hirtle is a Fellow and Past President of the Society of American Archivists and is a member of its Working Group on Intellectual Property.  He was a member of the Commission on Preservation and Access/Research Library Group’s Task Force on Digital Archiving and the Copyright Office’s Section 108 Study Group, and is a contributing author to the LibraryLaw.com blog.

February 27, Saturday | 9:30am-12:00pm | Irving K. Barber Learning Centre rm. 182 | Using scenarios from real-life cases, learn about some of the defences available in Canadian criminal law, including self-defence, provocation, necessity, and mental disorder. Learn what it takes to raise them successfully, and what controversies arise in their application.

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