Spatial aspects of health research will be the theme of this month’s UBC GIS Users Group meeting.  We will have three presenters, each giving a brief description of their use of GIS and mapping in health research.  If there’s time, we’ll follow with a general discussion about the use of GIS technology and data in health research.

Event details:
Wednesday, February 29, 2012
3:00 – 4:00pm
Koerner Library, Level 2, Room 216

Presentations:

“Three Projects Applying GIS in Public Health: Mapping Local Social Barriers to Sexual Health Clinics in Two Rural Communities, Provincial Emergency/Hormonal Contraceptive Use Trough Time, and National Abortion Travel Patterns.”
Anthony Smith, Human Early Learning Partnership Knowledge Translation Team

“Neighbourhood Environment in Waterloo Region:  Patterns of Transportation and Health”
Josh van Loon, School of Community and Regional Planning Active Transportation Lab

“Spatial Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Canada: Examining the Role of Air Pollution and Neighborhood Deprivation”
Perry Hystad, PhD Candidate, School of Population and Public Health

Understanding the Role of Citation Analysis and Impact Factors in your Academic Career

Learn how to use tools that measure the impact of articles, journals and individual scholars including you! You will leave this workshop knowing how to :

  • use ISI Web of Science and Google Scholar to track citations
  • calculate impact factors of individual scholars and journals and whether this is informative in your discipline

Thursday, February 9th, 2012 at 5:00PM – 6:00PM
Koerner Library
Room 217

Online registration here: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/2836

Learn a step-by-step approach to identify databases, primary sources and other research tools and then to perform comprehensive searches and keep track of what you’ve found.

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012
1:00PM – 3:30PM
Koerner Library, Room 216
Bring your own laptop
Register online at http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/2832

 

Save valuable research time! Online research resources offer an array of tools to help you stay current in your field. In this workshop you’ll learn how to set up email alerts and RSS feeds to:

  • be notified when new articles and dissertations are published on your topic
  • receive Table of Contents for the latest issue of your favorite journal
  • find out when new books in your discipline have arrived in the library
  • be notified of funding and upcoming conference opportunities
  • follow news stories and blogsNo matter what your discipline, you’ll leave the session having set up a number of alerts to stay up-to-date with your research interests!

Date: Thursday, January 26th, 2012 at 12:00pm – 1:30pm
Location:
Koerner Library, Rm 216
Registration:
http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/2829

Bodenhamer, David J., John Corrigan, and Trevor M. Harris. The Spatial Humanities: GIS and the Future of Humanities Scholarship. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010.

From the publisher’s description:

The Spatial Humanities aims to re-orient—and perhaps revolutionize—humanities scholarship by critically engaging the technology and specifically directing it to the subject matter of the humanities. To this end, the contributors explore the potential of spatial methods such as text-based geographical analysis, multimedia GIS, animated maps, deep contingency, deep mapping, and the geo-spatial semantic web.

Browse a Google Preview of The Spatial Humanities here.

Image: Inuktituk Dialect Map , created by Asybaris01

 

The Public Policy Group and the Impact of Social Sciences blog  at  the London School of Economics have produced a guide to “show academics and researchers how to get the most out of [Twitter] the micro-blogging site. The guide is designed to lead the novice through the basics of Twitter but also provide tips on how it can aid the teaching and research of the more experienced academic tweeter.”

Amy Mollett, Danielle Moran and Patrick Dunleavy. Using Twitter in University Research, Teaching and Impact Activities: a guide for academics and researchers. LSE Public Policy Group, 2011

 

If you’ve ever wondered about the future of the book, have a look at these:

Living Books About Life is a series of curated, open access books about life — with life understood both philosophically and biologically — which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. Produced by a globally-distributed network of writers and editors, the books in the series repackage existing open access science research by clustering it around selected topics whose unifying theme is life: e.g., air, agriculture, bioethics, cosmetic surgery, electronic waste, energy, neurology and pharmacology.”  (from Living Books About Life)

Cover photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/simonwheatley/5128638903/ under http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ license.

 

 

 

 

Crowd on Canada DayNoon-Hour Intro to RefWorks Workshop
Tuesday, November 1st, 2011 at 12:00PM – 1:00PM
Woodward Biomedical Library: Teaching Lab – Room B25

Finding and Using Data from the Census of Canada
Thursday, November 3rd, 2011 at 10:00AM – 11:45AM
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre: Room 318 – Library Computer Lab

Photo: Winston Wong

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