The conference program features a range of sessions that will interest teacher-librarians and educators from all levels, and anyone interested in improving their teaching skills in literacy (e.g. visual, critical, etc.), research, and technology.  Please contact Heather Daly if you have questions: hdaly@sd43.bc.ca or 604-937-6380.

Keynotes include: Dr. David Loertscher, San José State University School of Library & Information Science and Chris Kennedy, CEO / Superintendent of Schools, School District #45 West Vancouver.  Featured speakers include: Dr. Joanne de Groot, Dr. Ann Ewbank, Adrienne Gear, Judith Comfort, and over thirty other amazing educators.

October 18 and 19

Riverside Secondary School, Port Coquitlam

Detailed program information and registration is now available here.

~text from the BCTLA Coquitlam 2012 Website

Open Education has come of age. The tiny movement that began in the late 1990s as a desire to increase access to educational opportunity has blossomed into requirements in national grant programs, key strategies in state legislatures and offices of education, content sharing initiatives at hundreds of universities and high schools, and a wide range of innovation and entrepreneurship in both the commercial and nonprofit sectors.

For over a decade the focus of the open education community has been on open educational resources. As we celebrate the success of that work the Open Education 2012 Conference will also lay out a road map for the next decade where open education moves beyond content.

OpenEd12, the ninth annual Open Education Conference, will frame the conversation about the future of open education. Come be part of the discussion – we need your energy, brains, passion, and dedication!

Join us for the “annual reunion of the open education family,” spanning three stimulating days in Vancouver, BC, October 16-18.

~from the Open Education: Beyond Content Website. Further information and registration here

Check out the Education Library’s new addition to the dvd collection: Why Reading Matters. A BBC 4 Production.

“Science writer Rita Carter tells the story of how modern neuroscience has revealed that reading, something most of us take for granted, unlocks remarkable powers. Carter explains how the classic novel Wuthering Heights allows us to step inside other minds and understand the world from different points of view, and she wonders whether the new digital revolution could threaten the values of classic reading.”

 ~text from the publisher’s website. Publisher’s information here.
 

UBC Library Holdings information here.

See the latest news on education reform, the revision of the school calendar, The School Act, and the response from the BCTF from the Tyee Newspaper The Hook Blog.

Complete The Hook blog article here.

The Tyee Education News here.

© The Tyee News

Studies show that reading is good for you!  Enjoy a book in one of these gorgeous libraries around the world. (Vancouver included).

Vancouver Sun article by Juanita Ng, Vancouver Sun April 4, 2012

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Join the discussion and help shape a National Reading Plan that will encourage, support and promote the joy of reading across Canada.

Have a look at the National Reading Plan DRAFT here.

Click here to view a detailed programme.
 

Register now, SPACE IS LIMITED.

~text and links from the National Reading Campaign website.

Stranger in a Strange Land 2012: A Children’s Literature Conference Organized by Graduate Students of the University of British Columbia

This is a one-day conference showcasing graduate research that explores and questions any facet of children’s literature.

Presenters are coming from across Canada, with some from the UK, US, and France.

Keynote speakers: Elizabeth Marshall and Sarah Park.

Program schedule here.

There is still time to register!  $18 for students and presenters, and $35 for faculty and professionals, includes morning and afternoon refreshments and a catered lunch. Register here.

The University of British Columbia
Saturday, April 28, 2012
8 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (First Floor)
1961 East Mall

The Diversity and Media Toolbox is a comprehensive suite of resources for teachers, students, law enforcement representatives and the general public, that explores issues relating to stereotyping, bias and hate in mainstream media and on the Internet. The program, which includes professional development tutorials, lesson plans, interactive student modules and background articles, is divided into two distinct but complementary topic areas: media portrayals of diversity and online hate.

Teacher’s Resource Catalogue

Trousse Éducative – Diversité et Médias here.

The Diversity and Media Toolbox was produced with the support of the Government of Canada through the Department of Justice Canada’s Justice Partnership and Innovation Program.

~text from the Media Awareness Network website

Ebooks are driving momentous changes. In Vancouver, librarians are inviting the public to help reinvent their mission.

There are certain things, good and bad, that ebooks can’t offer. Old bookmarks, penciled annotations and chocolate smudges between the pages… the tactile human touches that make die-hard proponents of print swear they’ll never make the switch.

But those traditionalists are becoming the minority of library borrowers, as the relative convenience of ebooks — downloadable from the comfort of one’s home — appeals to more and more library users. According to recently-released stats from the Vancouver Public Library, the lending and borrowing of electronic content, and in particular ebooks, is exploding.

At VPL, ebook downloads have increased almost tenfold year-on-year, from 3,718 in 2010 to 35,671 in 2011. On top of that, the library estimates that if the current growth rate of ebook borrowing continues, it will take less than five years for ebooks to dominate circulation.

Of course, the explosion of ebooks isn’t news to the publishing industry, which is still adjusting to the digital shift. Scott McIntyre, the publisher and chairman of Vancouver-based D&M Publishing, recently shared his take with The Tyee that sooner rather than later, at least in the publishing world, ebooks “will conquer all.” And there’s significant evidence to support McIntyre’s prophecy. Mid 2010, Amazon.com reported that sales for its Kindle reader outstripped hardcover sales, and by January 2011, Kindle books surpassed paperback sales as well.

Yet while the story of publishers reeling over the digital surge has been told, how are libraries affected by the shift? As VPL’s director of planning and development Daphne Wood points out, there are a number of issues the library faces with the takeover. Issues like how ebooks are licensed to libraries, concerns about access to e-readers (and a potential new “digital divide”), and how to build modern collections that appease everyone, are top of mind for many librarians.

By Robyn Smith, 05March2012, TheTyee.ca

Read The Tyee full article here.

In honour of Black History Month, the Education Library would like to feature the Historica-Dominion Institute’s online Black History in Canada Education Guide:

A Message to Teachers

The largest independent organization dedicated to Canadian history, identity and citizenship, The Historica-Dominion Institute is committed to bringing the stories and experiences of Canada into the classroom. This innovative Education Guide explores seminal events and personalities in Black Canadian history through engaging discussion and interactive activities. It was made possible with the generous support of TD Bank Group, whose commitment to Black history and culture has been celebrated.

The purpose of this Guide is to enhance your students’ knowledge and appreciation of the Black Canadian experience, drawing from Lawrence Hill”s award-winning historical fiction, The Book of Negroes, the remarkable journey of Aminata Diallo and the historic British document known as the Book of Negroes.  Structured around themes of journey, slavery, human rights, passage to Canada and contemporary culture, this Guide asks students to examine issues of identity, equality, community, and nation-building in both a historical and contemporary context. The tools provided here are supplemented with additional activities and resources at the Black History Portal. We hope this Guide will assist you in teaching this important aspect of Canadian history in your English, Social Studies, History or Law classroom.

~From the Black History Canada website

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