The BC Breath of Life Archival Institute for First Nations Languages provides First Nations community language workers the opportunity to participate in a week-long Institute being hosted at the University of British Columbia from May 14-20, 2017, for the reclamation and revitalization of BC First Nations languages. Kim Lawson, Reference Librarian at the Xwi7xwa Library, speaks on the particular topic of archival research.

Modeled on the “Breath of Life” Language Restoration Workshops initiated in the mid-90s by the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival, our objective is to promote active collaboration among people with a wide range of perspectives on language and culture to explore archives and museum collections at UBC in order to “breathe life” back into the manuscripts and other resources there, with the overarching goal of contributing to the health and sustainability of BC’s First Nations languages for future generations. Participants will be grouped into research teams, based on language affiliations, bringing together First Nations community language workers (broadly defined to include Elders, language learners, teachers, curriculum developers, and others working towards language vitality) and university-based scholars with diverse skills that can contribute to finding and interpreting materials relevant to language and culture reclamation. Team members will actively work together to study resources housed in various collections at UBC that are directly relevant to their languages. Team members will mentor one another and share their expertise throughout the program, building not only research resources, but also relationships for potential on-going collaboration.

“Open scholarship, which encompasses open access, open data, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is changing how knowledge is created and shared.” Association of Research Libraries Open Scholarship

In this session, we’ll explore ideas of scholarly practice in the digital age and how they can inform or be applied to teaching and learning. How has scholarly practice changed and what are the possibilities that open practices and platforms open up when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative work?

We’ll look at emerging practices at UBC that are engaging students as producers of knowledge using open platforms to align classroom spaces with scholarly practice.

Part of Open Education Week


Event Details

Date: March 27, 2017

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:30 pm

Where: Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room 301

Registration Required: At this time we require everyone – UBC affiliated or otherwise – to register for the CTLT events system. If you already have a CWL please sign in. However, if you do not have a campus-wide login, then please register for a BASIC cwl account (you will see basic as the bottom option on the 3rd screen).


As teaching librarians, we introduce our students to knowledge organization structures that enable inquiry and curiosity in the library, but also use language and logic that we might otherwise contest. Students researching gender and sexual identities in our library catalogs, for example, must confront a controlled vocabulary that represents bias against them more than it does the reality of their own lives. These are pivotal moments, where students intersect with structures of power. Librarians engaged in critical work against dominant knowledge formations can both help students perceive the structures of power that enable some ways of knowing and not others, and help them understand those structures as subject to change. We can begin by understanding how librarians are produced in part by intersections with structures of power.

The Workshop for Instruction in Library Use (WILU) is Canada’s only conference devoted to library instruction, information literacy, and information fluency. Sessions explore both research-based and applied subject matter, and are attended by librarians from Canada, the United States, and beyond with a variety of teaching and learning interests. It is notable that WILU is not affiliated with any association or organizing body – instead, since its inception in 1972, it has been sustained and passed on from year to year through the collaborative efforts of hosting institutions.


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Accardi, M. T., Drabinski, E., & Kumbier, A. (2010). Critical library instruction: Theories and methods. Duluth, Minn: Library Juice Press. [Available at Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – Z711.25.C65 C75 2010]

Drabinski, E. (2012). Forum:Radical teacheras an online and open access journal. The Radical Teacher, (94), 3-13. doi:10.5406/radicalteacher.94.0003 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2013). Queering the catalog: Queer theory and the politics of correction. The Library Quarterly: Information, Community, Policy, 83(2), 94-111. doi:10.1086/669547 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2014). Toward a kairos of library instruction. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 40(5), 480-485. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2014.06.002 [Link]

Drabinski, E. (2016). Valuing professionalism: Discourse as professional practice. Library Trends, 64(3), 604-614. [Link]

Langholt, J. (2012). Critical library instruction: Theories and methods. edited by maria T. accardi, emily drabinski, and alana kumbier. duluth, MN: Library juice press, 2010. pp. xvi+341. ISBN 978–1-936117-01-7. The Library Quarterly, 82(1), 93-96. doi:10.1086/662949 [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Learning Technology

Library, Information, and Archival Studies

The iSchool at UBC (School of Library, Archival, and Information Studies) invites guest speakers to participate in the Colloquia Series. These events are open to the public, and are of interest to faculty, current students, alumni, and other professionals and researchers in the community.

The faculty contacts for the Colloquia Colloquia Series are Dr. Aaron Loehrlein and Dr. Heather O’Brien.

Research Day 2016: Keynote Speech

Friday, March 11, 11:00am-12:00pm

The Curator and Copyright

How does it happen that a practicing archivist, fully happy with the normal archival tasks of accessioning, describing, preserving, and making available archival collections, ends up spending most of his time thinking about copyright?  This talk will highlight three areas that seem core to the archival mission but that are also shaped by copyright.  Archivists can use new technologies to increase access to holdings, license access to content from the repository, and preserve born-digital objects.  Yet there is a copyright component to all these activities.  Understanding that component and how to minimize the risk that it poses should be part of the archivist’s toolkit. 

Speaker bio

Peter Hirtle, Affiliate Fellow, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University

Until his retirement from Cornell in 2015, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues.  Previously at Cornell, Hirtle served as Director of the Cornell Institute for Digital Collections and as the Associate Editor of D-Lib Magazine.  He is an archivist by training with an MA in History from Johns Hopkins and an MLS with a concentration in archival science from the University of Maryland.  Hirtle is a Fellow and Past President of the Society of American Archivists and is a member of its Working Group on Intellectual Property.  He was a member of the Commission on Preservation and Access/Research Library Group’s Task Force on Digital Archiving and the Copyright Office’s Section 108 Study Group, and is a contributing author to the LibraryLaw.com blog.

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