DEAR20105October 26th, 2015 is the 9th anniversary of the BC Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) Challenge!

DEAR began when the BC Teacher-Librarians’ Association (BCTLA) challenged schools in BC to participate in twenty minutes of simultaneous reading on a Monday morning in October.  Over the years DEAR has gathered momentum and involved:

  • athletes
  • business leaders
  • politicians and
  • provincial and municipal government offices.

The simple, but powerful idea of DEAR is to promote the importance of literacy by having as many students and adults as possible read at the same time on the same day.

The DEAR Challenge for October 26th, 2015 is for EVERYONE in BC to put down their work, turn off their computer screens, pick up a book, magazine or newspaper and read for 20 minutes.

You are invited to join BC teachers and students on October 26, 2015 as they Drop Everything And Read!

Please add this event to your calendar.

Please join with us in celebrating National School Library Day!  We are honouring Professor Judith Saltman.

The Place and Space for Canadian Children’s Literature in Our Lives and Libraries”

Panel presenters: Maggie DeVries, Jan Hare, Yukiko Tosa, Judith Saltman


Why should we care about Canadian Children’s literature in our lives and libraries? Is Canadian identity critical in a digital, global, pop culture world?  Do parents, teachers, teacher-librarians, librarians and young people really care whether they read Canadian or not?  Join with our panel presenters as they discuss these questions and more.  Maggie DeVries will offer her perspective as a writer for children who has situated both her fiction and non-fiction in BC.  Jan Hare will comment as a First Nations scholar and Associate Professor of Indigenous Education at UBC.  Yukiko Tosa will provide insights into public and school library collections in her role as head of Britannia Community School Library.  Judith Saltman will conclude with remarks based on her research as a Canadian children’s literature scholar.

Where: Room 185, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

When: 5:00-6:00 p.m., Tuesday October 27, 2015

readingAn article from the Daily Mail this week highlights a new study from the Max Planck Child Study Centre at Manchester University. The study found reading a picture book with one or two words per page to be just as beneficial for a pre-school child as reading one with long sentences.

From the article: “The key to success is as much talking about what happens in the book as reading the text. Simple text tends to stimulate complex discussions between adult and child, whereas complicated sentences reduce the need for dialogue, the study concluded.”

British Columbia’s fourth-grade students rank among the world’s top readers at their grade level and had the highest average score in Canada, according to a new international report.

Click here for the full article in the Vancouver Sun by Christopher Reynolds

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Faculty of Education’s CREATE series. George Belliveau is Associate Professor at the UBC Department of Language and Literacy Education. He gave the Opening Keynote address, “Shakespeare and drama in the primary classroom” for the Drama New Zealand National Conference in April, as well as conducted workshops with elementary and secondary teachers on drama in the classroom. As a Visiting Professor at the University of Auckland for April 2011, he was invited to present a public lecture on “Research-based theatre.” In May, Belliveau presented “Research-based theatre: Shakespeare in the Elementary classroom,” an invited research presentation at the University of Melbourne.

About the Speaker

Professor George Belliveau teaches in the Department of Language and Literacy Education in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia. His research interests are in art education, artistic and aesthetic development, drama education, pedagogy, and teacher research.

Select Articles Available

Belliveau, G. (2012). Shakespeare and Literacy: A Case Study in a Primary Classroom. Journal of Social Sciences. 8(2). pp. 170-176. [Link]

Lea, Graham W; Belliveau, George; Wager, Amanda; Beck, Jaime L. (2011). A Loud Silence: Working with Research-Based Theatre and A/R/Tography. International Journal of Education & the Arts. 12(16). p. 19. [Link]

White, Vince and Belliveau, George. (2011). Multiple Perspectives, Loyalties and Identities: Exploring Intrapersonal Spaces through Research-Based Theatre. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education (QSE). 24(2). pp. 227-238. [Link]

UBC Research Guides

Historical Children’s Literature

Historical Children’s Literature Bibliography

Literature Reviews

You are cordially invited to re-imagine the role of libraries – specifically the Education Library, First Nations House of Learning Xwi7xwa Library, and more broadly, school libraries will be examined.

The re-imagined teacher education program has inspired revision in the role Education librarians play to respectfully and meaningfully integrate First Nations history, content, and world-views; commit to inquiry and research oriented education; and emphasize diversity and social and ecological justice. Our libraries can support teacher candidates as they acquire theoretical understandings for teaching and apply those theories in their practice. We bring teacher candidates and ideas together in library spaces that offer unique learning environments, where inquiry, collaboration, the role of Indigenous Knowledge, relationships and ways of knowing are celebrated. This session will be interactive: we present our re-imagined roles and seek feedback and ideas to further ensure our relevance for faculty and teacher candidates.

Presented by:

Sarah Dupont
Aboriginal Engagement Librarian, First Nations House of Learning—Xwi7xwa Library

 Jo-Anne Naslund

Instructional Programs Librarian, Education Library

Danielle Winn
Reference and Instruction Librarian, Education Library

Scarfe Building, Education Library Room 155, 12:30pm

The conference program features a range of sessions that will interest teacher-librarians and educators from all levels, and anyone interested in improving their teaching skills in literacy (e.g. visual, critical, etc.), research, and technology.  Please contact Heather Daly if you have questions: or 604-937-6380.

Keynotes include: Dr. David Loertscher, San José State University School of Library & Information Science and Chris Kennedy, CEO / Superintendent of Schools, School District #45 West Vancouver.  Featured speakers include: Dr. Joanne de Groot, Dr. Ann Ewbank, Adrienne Gear, Judith Comfort, and over thirty other amazing educators.

October 18 and 19

Riverside Secondary School, Port Coquitlam

Detailed program information and registration is now available here.

~text from the BCTLA Coquitlam 2012 Website

Open Education has come of age. The tiny movement that began in the late 1990s as a desire to increase access to educational opportunity has blossomed into requirements in national grant programs, key strategies in state legislatures and offices of education, content sharing initiatives at hundreds of universities and high schools, and a wide range of innovation and entrepreneurship in both the commercial and nonprofit sectors.

For over a decade the focus of the open education community has been on open educational resources. As we celebrate the success of that work the Open Education 2012 Conference will also lay out a road map for the next decade where open education moves beyond content.

OpenEd12, the ninth annual Open Education Conference, will frame the conversation about the future of open education. Come be part of the discussion – we need your energy, brains, passion, and dedication!

Join us for the “annual reunion of the open education family,” spanning three stimulating days in Vancouver, BC, October 16-18.

~from the Open Education: Beyond Content Website. Further information and registration here

a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

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