Who We Are with Elizabeth May

Join leader of the Green Party of Canada and Member of Parliament, Elizabeth May, for a riveting discussion on Canada’s role in a challenging time.

In Who We Are: Reflections on my life and on Canada, Elizabeth draws from her life experience, growing up in a politically active family in the US, to moving to a small village on Cape Breton Island. Forty five years after leaving the US as a teenager, she will reflect on the decline of US society, the rise of ignorance and the challenge for Canada. The Paris Agreement and the impact of Trump will be explored with a surprisingly hopeful conclusion.

 


More About Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May is Leader of the Green Party of Canada and its first elected Member of Parliament, representing Saanich-Gulf Islands in southern Vancouver Island. In 2005, Elizabeth May was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in recognition of her decades of leadership in the Canadian environmental movement.

She graduated from Dalhousie Law School and was admitted to the Bar in both Nova Scotia and Ontario. She practiced law in Ottawa with the Public Interest Advocacy Centre prior to becoming Senior Policy Advisor to the federal minister of the Environment (1986- 1988). For seventeen years Elizabeth served as Executive Director of the Sierra Club of Canada. A proud mother and grandmother, she lives in Sidney, British Columbia.

Elizabeth is the author of eight books, including her most recent book Who We Are: Reflections on my life and on Canada.


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Iving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by UBC Reads Sustainability and the R. Grant Ingram Distinguished Speaker Program.

In this moderated conversation, Duncan McCue will share his experience writing The Shoe Boy, a story of him discovering his indigenous identity as a teenager and his perspective on how connection to land and cultural identity are related to the world’s sustainability. Duncan McCue is the host of CBC Radio One Cross Country Checkup. McCue was a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. Now based in Toronto, his news and current affairs pieces continue to be featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National.

McCue’s work has garnered several RTNDA and Jack Webster Awards. He was part of a CBC Aboriginal investigation into missing and murdered Indigenous women that won numerous honours including the Hillman Award for Investigative Journalism. McCue has spent years teaching journalism at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism and was recognized by the Canadian Ethnic Media Association with an Innovation Award for developing curriculum on Indigenous issues. He’s also an author: his book The Shoe Boy: A Trapline Memoir recounts a season he spent in a hunting camp with a Cree family in northern Quebec as a teenager. He was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (riic.ca). Before becoming a journalist, McCue studied English at the University of King’s College, then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. McCue is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario, and proud father of two children.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

The intrepid native reporter: Duncan McCue. Jones, M., Bear, J. and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2008).[Video/DVD] Vancouver: Moving Images Distribution.McCue, D., & Xwi7xwa Collection. [Link]

The shoe boy: A trapline memoir. New Westminster, British Columbia: Nonvella Publishing Inc. (2016). [Link]

Restorative justice: Capacity for forgiveness. McCue, D., Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Xwi7xwa Collection (Directors). (2010).[Video/DVD] Toronto: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. [Link]


Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the UBC Himalaya Program .

This conversation will give both authors the space to discuss their recently published novels, short stories, and non-fiction, and exchange their perspectives on what it means to represent Nepal and Tibet in the English-language literary scene in Canada and abroad.
Speaker Biographies:

Tsering Wangmo Dhompa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manjushree_Thapa) is the author of three collections of poetry: My rice tastes like the lake, In the Absent Everyday and Rules of the House (all from Apogee Press, Berkeley). My rice tastes like the lake was a finalist for the Northern California Independent Bookseller’s Book of the Year Award for 2012. Dhompa’s first non-fiction book, Coming Home to Tibet was published by Shambhala Publications in 2016. She teaches creative writing and is a PhD candidate in Literature at the University of California in Santa Cruz.

Manjushree Thapa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsering_Wangmo_Dhompa) is the author of three novels, a short story collection and three nonfiction books about her homeland, Nepal. She is also a literary translator, and her translation of Darjeeling author Indra Bahadur Rai’s novel There’s a Carnival Today was released in South Asia in October 2017. The Canadian edition of her latest novel, All of Us in Our Own Lives, will be out in 2018. She lives in Toronto.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Dhompa, T. W. (2005). In the absent everyday. Berkeley, Calif: Apogee Press. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2005). Forget kathmandu: An elegy for democracy. New York, New York;New Delhi;: Penguin, Viking. [Link]

Thapa, M. (2004). friends. Manoa, 16(2), 169-183. [Link]

“Reading Worlds at Home”

Featuring readings by Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, and Larissa Lai and a discussion of the film All Our Father’s Relations  by Elder Larry Grant and Sarah Ling.

The event was part of “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” a public symposium bringing together scholars from across Canada, the US and Australia to consider the future of cosmopolitanism as a critical approach to scholarship and praxis. The symposium took place on UBC’s Vancouver campus from March 16-17, 2017 and featured an interview with Dr. Sneja Gunew (UBC) and a launch of her book, Post-multicultural Writers as Neo-cosmopolitan Mediators (Anthem Press) as well as a keynote address by Dr. Pheng Cheah (UC Berkeley) and more.

For more information about “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” visit: http://worldsathome.arts.ubc.ca/

Speakers: Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, Larissa Lai (University of Calgary), Elder Larry Grant, Sarah Ling

Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bradley, A., & Bradley, A. (10/01/2010). International journal of refugee law: Beyond borders; cosmopolitanism and family reunification for refugees in canada Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ijrl/eeq025 [Link]

Breckenridge, C. A. (2002). Cosmopolitanism Duke University Press. [Link]

Cheah, P. (2016). What is a world : on postcolonial literature as world literature. Duke University Press [Link]

Gunew, S.M. (2017). Post-multicultural writers as neo-cosmopolitan mediators. Anthem Press [Ordered at Koerner Library, call number forthcoming]

Gunew, S. M., & Rizvi, F. (1994). Culture, difference and the arts. St Leonards, NSW, Australia: Allen & Unwin. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks DU120 .C85 1994]

Kwa, L. (2013). Sinuous. Winnipeg: Turnstone Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8571.W3 S56 2013]

Lai, L. (2014). Slanting I, imagining we Asian Canadian literary production in the 1980s and 1990s. Wilfrid Laurier University Press [Link]

Lai, L. (2002). Salt Fish Girl: A Novel. Toronto: T. Allen Publishers. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8573.A3775 S24 2002]

Mootoo, S. (2014). Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab. Toronto: Doubleday Canada [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8576.O569 M68 2014]


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