Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by alumni UBC.

One of the most respected filmmakers of his generation and a true artist, Atom Egoyan is the director behind modern classics such as Exotica, the Oscar-nominated The Sweet Hereafter, Ararat, and Chloe. A master of visual and verbal storytelling, Egoyan takes bold non-linear routes through complex psychological terrain in his films.

Please join us for a very special evening in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of film classes in UBC’s Department of Theatre & Film where Atom Egoyan will share how he tells compelling stories in Canadian film and a rapidly changing industry, and why bold film-making has never been more important than it is in our current global political climate.

Speaker Biography

Atom Egoyan
In his films, Atom Egoyan—an Egyptian-born Armenian-Canadian—often returns to common themes of intimacy, displacement, and the impact of technology and media on everyday life. His ability to understand and inspire teams of highly talented but disparate people is critical to tackling these subjects and to producing his unique vision. Egoyan’s keen ability to blend insightful stories that don’t fear being complicated with universal human themes has resulted in a daring body of work, popular with critics and audiences alike.

Egoyan has collected prestigious awards from Cannes and the Toronto International Film Festival, acted as President of the Jury at the Berlin Film Festival, was knighted by the French government, and received Canada’s top civilian honour, The Order of Canada. From 2006 to 2009, he was the Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in theatre, film, music and visual studies at University of Toronto. Egoyan has been Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Ryerson University since 2013.


Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Burwell, Jennifer L., and Monique Tschofen. Image and Territory: Essays on Atom Egoyan. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ont, 2007;2006;.[Link]

Egoyan, A., & Morris, T. J. (2010). Atom egoyan: Interviews. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.[Link]

Hogikyan, N. (2015). Atom egoyan et la diaspora arménienne: Génocide, identités, déplacements, survivances. Paris: L’Harmattan.[Link]

“Reading Worlds at Home”

Featuring readings by Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, and Larissa Lai and a discussion of the film All Our Father’s Relations  by Elder Larry Grant and Sarah Ling.

The event was part of “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” a public symposium bringing together scholars from across Canada, the US and Australia to consider the future of cosmopolitanism as a critical approach to scholarship and praxis. The symposium took place on UBC’s Vancouver campus from March 16-17, 2017 and featured an interview with Dr. Sneja Gunew (UBC) and a launch of her book, Post-multicultural Writers as Neo-cosmopolitan Mediators (Anthem Press) as well as a keynote address by Dr. Pheng Cheah (UC Berkeley) and more.

For more information about “Worlds at Home: On Cosmopolitan Futures,” visit: http://worldsathome.arts.ubc.ca/

Speakers: Shani Mootoo, Lydia Kwa, Larissa Lai (University of Calgary), Elder Larry Grant, Sarah Ling

Select Books and Articles Available at UBC Library

Bradley, A., & Bradley, A. (10/01/2010). International journal of refugee law: Beyond borders; cosmopolitanism and family reunification for refugees in canada Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ijrl/eeq025 [Link]

Breckenridge, C. A. (2002). Cosmopolitanism Duke University Press. [Link]

Cheah, P. (2016). What is a world : on postcolonial literature as world literature. Duke University Press [Link]

Gunew, S.M. (2017). Post-multicultural writers as neo-cosmopolitan mediators. Anthem Press [Ordered at Koerner Library, call number forthcoming]

Gunew, S. M., & Rizvi, F. (1994). Culture, difference and the arts. St Leonards, NSW, Australia: Allen & Unwin. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks DU120 .C85 1994]

Kwa, L. (2013). Sinuous. Winnipeg: Turnstone Press. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8571.W3 S56 2013]

Lai, L. (2014). Slanting I, imagining we Asian Canadian literary production in the 1980s and 1990s. Wilfrid Laurier University Press [Link]

Lai, L. (2002). Salt Fish Girl: A Novel. Toronto: T. Allen Publishers. [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8573.A3775 S24 2002]

Mootoo, S. (2014). Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab. Toronto: Doubleday Canada [Available at Koerner Library Stacks PS8576.O569 M68 2014]


UBC Library Research Guides

Anthropology

Education

 

 

D_Baldwin-300x300Abstract

The Myaamia language was labeled an extinct language by the mid 20th century. After 25 years of reconstruction and revitalization, the Myaamia language is spoken once again among a younger generation of tribal youth who are using language learning opportunities to reconnect to each other and their Indigenous knowledge system. It is through the creation of a holistic well-designed educational effort that cultural knowledge and language proficiency will increase over time. This talk will explore the strategies employed by the Myaamia community in their attempts to rebuild community through language and cultural education.

Daryl Baldwin, Director, Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a unique collaborative effort supported by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University in Oxford, Ohio for the purpose of advancing the language and cultural needs of the Myaamia people. Daryl received an MA in linguistics from the University of Montana. He has worked with the Myaamia people developing language and cultural materials since 1995. For an update on the projects currently under development through the Myaamia Center please visit the web site at www.myaamiacenter.org.

Location & Timing

11:30-1:00pm, Monday, February 22, 2016
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse
1985 West Mall


Journalists, grant givers and an interested public often ask which language revitalization programs and strategies have been successful. But “language revitalization” is a broad term that can include many different possible goals, and “success” is a point of view rather than a concrete fact. This paper is a result of conversations with Indigenous language activists as to what they view as success (or failure) in the language revitalization for themselves and their communities. These conversations lead to the observation that what counts as success is diverse, individualistic, and transitory, since one event perceived as a success immediately leads to changing goals, strategies, and viewpoints. Nor can “success” be seen as an endpoint of effort, since language revitalization is an unending process —the effort must never stop, in a land where another language is the dominant and dominating tongue.  Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Future Speakers: Indigenous Languages in the 21st Century series.

Speaker Bio

Leanne Hinton, professor emerita Department of Linguistics, University of California at Berkeley & Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival Leanne Hinton specializes in endangered languages and is an advocate and practicing trainer in the field of language revitalization. Hinton has helped found several organizations for language revitalization, and has helped design several widely-used revitalization programs and strategies. She has written and edited numerous books and articles on language revitalization, and has won several awards for her work.

The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Thursday October 22, 2015, 11.30-1.00PM at the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Lillooet Room (Rm 301).


Select Articles and Books Available at UBC Library

Hinton, L. (2013). Bringing our languages home: Language revitalization for families. Berkeley, California: Heyday. [Available at Koerner Library – P40.5.L356 B75 2013]

Simpson, J., & Wigglesworth, G. (2008). Children’s language and multilingualism: Indigenous language use at home and school. New York;London;: Continuum. [Available at Koerner Library – P115.2 .C45 2008]

Tsunoda, T., & Ebrary Academic Complete (Canada) Subscription Collection. (2006;2013;). Language endangerment and language revitalization: An introduction Mouton de Gruyter. [Link]


UBC Library Research Guides

Aboriginal Languages

First Nations and Indigenous Studies

First Nations Languages of British Columbia


 

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